Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Targeting Preclinical Diastolic Dysfunction to Prevent Heart Failure

Heart failure (HF) affects over 5 million American adults, and projected estimates show growth of this epidemic by 25% over the next 15 years as the population of the United States continues to age. Heart failure with preserved EF (HFpEF) encompasses 50% of all heart failure cases. Preclinical diastolic dysfunction (PDD) is defined as normal systolic function, moderate or severe diastolic dysfunction determined by Doppler ...more »

Submitted by (@chen.horng)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Identify Pathways of Risk Linking Psychosocial Stress to Ischemic Heart Disease in Women

Women differ from men in their manifestations of ischemic heart disease (IHD). They also differ from men with respect to prevalence of psychosocial factors and vulnerability to specific mental disorders. Young women, in particular, appear to be highly susceptible to the adverse cardiovascular effects of psychosocial stress. Those who already have clinical manifestations of IHD display high psychosocial burden which could ...more »

Submitted by (@viola.vaccarino)

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Investigating Co-Morbidities in Women's Cardiovascular Health

There are important questions related to the cardiovascular health of women, and particularly to diagnostic and therapeutic challenges arising from the common existence of co-morbid conditions. The latter consideration, as well as the limitations of the budgets of individual institutes and centers at the NIH, suggest that it may be reasonable for the NHLBI to consider cross-NIH collaborations with I/Cs that have related ...more »

Submitted by (@rosemarie.robertson)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

What is the role of diet and nutrition in treatment, management and prevention of Heart Failure?

Heart Failure (HF) remains a major public health burden. A working group was convened by NHLBI and ODS in June, 2013 to address the role of diet and nutrition in management of HF. A review of existing evidence produced no clear rationale for appropriate dietary interventions. On the contrary, the group developed recommendations for conducting additional research specifically on the role of sodium, fluid, nutrients, and ...more »

Submitted by (@lvanhorn)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Advancing Translational Research

Ensuring that basic science is translated into clinical practice is essential. While there have been great strides in ensuring that babies born with congenital heart defects (CHD) are identified and repaired, we know that there are lifelong implications for those with CHDs that require continued follow-up and treatment. As the proportion of those with CHDs as adults continues to outpace the pediatric population, we urge ...more »

Submitted by (@dstephens)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Promotion of human health and reduction of human disease

Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common birth defect and leading cause of defect-related infant mortality. With nearly 1 in 100 babies born annually with CHD, the needs of children and adults born with CHD are ongoing and costly. More focused research into CHD promotes human health and will result in a better quality of life, reduced premature death and lower healthcare costs.

Submitted by (@dstephens)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Calcium channels in cardiovascular functions and diseases

Fifty years ago Prof. Harald Reuter of the University of Bern, Switzerland obtained the first experimentally supported evidence that the calcium channel is a physiologically distinct entity. Further stimulated by the synthesis of the dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker nifedipine, the field of calcium channel research rapidly encompassed cardiovascular and other powerful biomedical directions.

Submitted by (@soldatovn.humgenex)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Impact of lung remodeling on congestive heart failure progression

End stage congestive heart failure (CHF) causes intensive lung remodeling beyond the type-2 pulmonary hypertension. CHF induced lung remodeling includes profound lung fibrosis, lung vascular remodeling and lung inflammation. Understanding CHF-induced lung remodeling is also critical to understand the right ventricular failure. However, this area is largely unstudied. Regulating CHF-induced lung remodeling and the underlying ...more »

Submitted by (@chenx106)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Congential heart defects in diabetic pregnancies: a devastating reality

There is an urgent need to understand the mechanisms underlying diabetes-induced congenital heart defects (CHDs) through basic science research and biomarker identification in human maternal circulation. Majority of the current research in CHDs is related to genetic analyses; however, environmental factors contribute to the majority of human CHDs, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. There is 60 million worldwide ...more »

Submitted by (@pyang0)

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

THE RELEVANCE OF PREVENTION TRIALS

Prevention trials, implemented to reduce or delay progression to overt disease in a population at risk to the disease, are an important approach to health promotion. Therapies shown to reduce disease severity in patients with a specific disease are obvious, but not the only, candidates for a prevention trial in populations at high risk for prevalent diseases (such as heart failure, diabetes, COPD, asthma in children). ...more »

Submitted by (@media0)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Guideline effectiveness in treating COPD patients with comorbidities vs. those without

What is the effectiveness of guideline recommendations for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) care in patients with multimorbidity, including angina, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and osteoporosis, vs. patients without these conditions?

Submitted by (@spencer)

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