Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Design interventions to improve sleep hygiene

Inadequate sleep is associated with risk of obesity. Electronic media devices interfere with our ability to sleep well - they delay sleep, interrupt sleep, and affect sleep quality. However these devices are addictive and ubiquitous. Can we develop interventions to help people obtain adequate sleep?

Submitted by (@anna.adachimejia)

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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Increased methods training for investigators

It is clear that there are concerns about reproducibility and quality control in science in general and in obesity-related research in particular. Increased opportunities for training in rigorous scientific practices for obesity researchers and biomedical and behavioral researchers in general may be helpful to increase rigor and reproducibility.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Move toward more probative research

As some of us described in a recent publication, in the fields of nutrition and obesity, and perhaps in other fields as well, there is often a great deal of research which uses up resources, investigator time, journal pages, and attention span for questions that do not advance the field. We call for scientists, reviewers, and funding decision makers to collectively ask much more rigorously, "How will this proposed study ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Increased receptivity to probative programmatic trials

We believe there should be greater openness to large, simple trials that answer clear questions of interest (e.g. does giving children more fruits and vegetables while changing nothing else lead to weight loss?; does eating breakfast regularly lead to weight loss?; etc.). The conduct of such trials may sometimes be expensive but can sometimes be only modestly costly if they are kept simple. However, it is difficult to ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Greater reliance on stronger observational study designs when true RCTs are not an option

With some notable exceptions, the space in between OATs and pure RCEs is seen, at least in obesity research, as a void. Such a constrained view inappropriately lumps together valid evidence from strong, non-randomized designs with evidence from weak designs that permit little causal inference. There are additional methods occupying that intermediary space of strength of causal inference. If we can encourage the use of ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Research training to support population-focused obesity research in ethnic minority populations

NIH is already facing a challenge in increasing the number and viability of researchers of color. Obesity research in black (or other high risk minority) populations can be used to explore how research training programs that focus on specific issues of importance to populations of color might contribute to the recruitment and success of ethnic minority researchers in the NIH system.

Submitted by (@skumanyi)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Impact research related to obesity interventions in black and and other high-risk populations?

How can we increase high-impact obesity and CVD-related intervention research with black and other high risk populations. Specifically, how can the NHLBI and NIH process ensure the generation of more research on solutions to weight issues that is goal-oriented and population-focused, e.g., sets of studies designed to align with a coherent, population-focused research agenda with prioritized questions based on potential ...more »

Submitted by (@skumanyi)

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Prevention of Obesity

What are the behavioral factors that predispose to excessive weight gain and development of obesity? And, which intervention strategies can effectively prevent excessive weight gain and obesity? NHLBI, other NIH institutes and the society at-large have invested heavily in research and clinical practice aimed at treatment of obesity (i.e, weight loss in those who are already overweight). However, much less research ...more »

Submitted by (@rpate0)

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

dose-response relationship for behavioral treatment of obesity

As a member of the NHLBI panel updating the obesity treatment guidelines, it was clear that there has not been much systematic work on the relationship between the frequency of intervention contacts and the short and long-term effects on weight change and maintenance of weight change. The general finding that more frequent contacts with professional weight loss counselors, and a longer series of contacts, are more effective, ...more »

Submitted by (@victor.j.stevens)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Strategic effort against obesity

The major challenge we face is that of the epidemic of obesity. It affects more than half the population, particularly Hispanics, blacks and those in the lower income bracket.

It is responsible for premature death, coronary disease, acute myocardial infarction. Atrial fibrillation and cancer.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Effect of obesity on recovery of lung function in pediatric survivors of critical illness

What are the determinants of persistent respiratory failure in children? Are obese children at greater risk for prolonged mechanical ventilation than non-obese children? Does BMI affect the time to recovery of lung function in obese children with ARDS? What is the pathogenesis and molecular contributors of obesity on respiratory failure in critical illness?

Submitted by (@greg.martin)

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