Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

To extend our knowledge of the pathobiology of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders and enable clinical investigations that advance the prediction, prevention, preemption, treatment, and cures of human disease.

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@marilynmoy)

Promoting Physical Activity in COPD

The GOLD guidelines recommend regular physical activity in all patients with stable COPD. How we operationalize this is completely unclear. We know pulmonary rehab works but few patients are referred and fewer participate. We also know physical activity, not just exercise, directly measured in the field is associated with COPD-specific outcomes such as acute exacerbations, hospitalizations and death. How do we bring ...more »

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@sdas00)

Role of extracellular RNAs in cardiac biology and disease

Extracellular RNAs including miRNAs, piRNAs, tRNA fragments and long non-coding RNA fragments have been found in plasma and correlated with disease. For microRNAs, there is emerging evidence of a functional role for these extracellular RNAs in cardiovascular diseases. However, there needs to be a concerted effort to: 1) develop new models and tools to study the role of these entities; 2) validate findings from different ...more »

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4 up votes
11 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@nareg.roubinian)

Biology of Red Blood Cell Alloimmunization

What determines which individuals will develop RBC alloimmune responses resulting in clinically meaningful sequelae? This question encompasses: 1) the generation of alloantibodies that limit the availability of compatible blood or cause hemolytic disease of the fetus or newborn (HDFN); 2) the distinction between clinically significant and insignificant alloantibody responses, especially within alloantibody specificities ...more »

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58 up votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@bavtad)

Recognition of bicuspid aortic valve's complexity, life threatening potential, and familial implications.

There is a persistent perception that bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), the most common congenital heart defect (estimated to occur in up to 6 million Americans), is a benign condition that may not require treatment until later in life, if at all. The implications for other blood relatives, although referenced in medical literature, may not be acknowledged. This notion, coupled with the inability to identify those most at ...more »

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1 net vote
12 up votes
11 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@david.goff)

Should clinical primary prevention of ASCVD be guided by subclincal disease or estimated risk?

Current approaches to guiding use of clinical primary prevention interventions, e.g., statins and aspirin, are based on treating patients who exceed a specific risk threshold. The performance of risk estimation is good, but not outstanding, and results from clinical and population studies continue to support the value of new biomarkers. Given the widespread use of preventive therapies, the lack of untreated cohorts is ...more »

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6 up votes
9 down votes
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