Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

To extend our knowledge of the pathobiology of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders and enable clinical investigations that advance the prediction, prevention, preemption, treatment, and cures of human disease.

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Non-obstructive Coronary Disease

It is increasingly apparent that ischemic heart disease does not equal obstructive coronary disease. There is a large, heterogeneous population of individuals who present to the ED with chest pain syndrome with or without a troponin elevation, who on diagnostic evaluation have non-obstructive disease and who on prospective studies have increased risk for ACS and early mortality; other literature shows the same for coronary ...more »

Submitted by (@matthew.burg)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

How can we non-invasively, but still accurately, measure blood pressure in the pulmonary arteries?

Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a complex, progressive condition characterized by high blood pressure in the lungs. The gold standard for measuring pressures in the pulmonary arteries is a right heart catheterization, where a special catheter is guided through the right side of the heart and into the pulmonary artery, the main vessel carrying blood to the lungs. This measurement is essential, as it allows physicians and ...more »

Submitted by (@katherinek)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Molecular mechanism for hypertension and the diverse co-morbidities

What molecular mechanism causes hypertension as well as the diverse co-morbidities in hypertension? We discovered a fundamental mechanism that causes chronic and acute tissue injury due to the action of the powerful digestive enzymes, the same used for daily digestion. In various acute and chronic cardiovascular conditions the compartmentalization of these enzymes fails and they escape into the intestine and systemic ...more »

Submitted by (@gwss00)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Innovations in Red Cell Transfusion in Sickle Cell Disease

Challenges that need to be overcome in blood transfusion, especially in SCD, include: a. Adopting molecular genotyping as the standard in blood transfusion therapy. b. Advancing new generation, anti-oxidant hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) for use in emergencies such as trauma, stroke, acute hemolysis, and in transfusion in SCD and related disorders. In SCD, HBOCs have the capacity to not only serve as substitutes ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

The relationship between genetic variation and disease mechanisms

What is the contribution of individual differences in RNA processing to disease causation, disease modification, disease susceptibility, and positive or negative responses to therapies? Studies using genome sequencing combined with RNA-seq have determined that genetic variation affects regulation of RNA processing as frequently as transcriptional regulation. While transcriptional networks are well defined in heart development ...more »

Submitted by (@tcooper)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Can Tai Chi Chuan Improve Osteoporosis?

Tai chi chuan, a slow-moving ancient form of martial art, is one of the fastest growing exercises today. People of all ages are learning it for a wide variety of reasons. The main reason seniors are learning tai chi is for the health-building effects. Osteoporosis is a common problem suffered by many seniors. I challenge NHLBI to research if and how osteoporosis is actually improved by a consistent and long-term ...more »

Submitted by (@mcs756s)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Improve ineffective treatments for circadian rhythm disorders

I have extreme delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD), a circadian rhythm disorder (CRD). I fall asleep at dawn and wake up early afternoon. My dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) is at 5:30 am. A normal person’s DLMO may be at 9 pm, for example. CRD treatment—prolonged bright light after temperature nadir, dark restriction/melatonin starting several hours before natural bedtime, darkness till temperature nadir—does not work ...more »

Submitted by (@susanpl)

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