Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Mechanisms of cardiac aging

The electrical and mechanical function of cardiac myocytes is compromised with age, but little is known about the age-related changes that occur within individual myocytes.

Submitted by (@catherine.proenza)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

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32 up votes
13 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Understanding Cardiothoracic Surgery in Elderly Populations

There is a vital need for evidence-based clinical evaluation tools to assess operative risk and post-operative recovery in the elderly, including biomarkers of physiologic age and a simple/reliable clinical evaluation scheme to determine frailty as a risk factor for poor surgical outcomes.

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Development of tools to assess operative risk and post-operative recover in the elderly would improve surgical outcomes in this growing patient population.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

This at risk population is growing rapidly.

Older patients represent an important, different, and under-studied subgroup of those undergoing cardiothoracic surgery according to the Joint NHLBI-AATS Working Group (http://aats.org/CME/2011-AATS-NHLBI-Symposium.cgi). Due to the aging of the US population and the increased severity of coronary and valve disease in older individuals, the use of cardiothoracic surgery in older patients in relative terms is growing rapidly. Between 1990 and 2008, the percentage of those aged 80 years or older has gone from 8% to 16% of total for bypass surgery and 14% to 30% of total for valve surgery.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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39 net votes
56 up votes
17 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Potential therapies for cardiac arrest due to non-shockable rhythms

Which, if any, pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies are useful and effective in cardiac arrest due to non-shockable rhythms?

Submitted by (@rebecca.lehotzky)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : AHA Staff & Volunteers

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-1 net votes
2 up votes
3 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Improving the Detection and Treatment of Cardiac Sarcoidosis

Sarcoidosis afflicts young adults, particularly African Americans and females, and often causes chronic disability or death. Cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) was once considered to be a rare disease manifestation; however, with the development of improved diagnostic testing procedures, such as MRI and PET scans, CS is now known to afflict up to 40% of sarcoidosis patients and is recognized as a major cause of death. The current ...more »

Submitted by (@elliott.crouser)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Improved detection of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) is necessary to screen for CS in the sarcoidosis population and to identify those patients requiring further testing and personalized treatments. The optimal CS detection tool would be able to quantify the burden of cardiac disease, and would provide insight into disease activity (e.g., acutely active/reversible versus inactive/irreversible cardiac disease). Once validated, the CS detection tool would be used to risk stratify patients for the purpose of initial and subsequent treatments.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Current and evolving imaging techniques have rapidly improved the detection of sarcoidosis, so these technologies are feasible. However, it is unclear how to interpret the results of these novel imaging techniques in the context of treating humans with sarcoidosis. A number of challenges remain (e.g., how to distinguish active from inactive cardiac sarcoidosis, and how to objectively assess disease severity as relates to the risk of serious adverse cardiac events). A strength of this project being that this field is poised for clinical investigations designed to improve cardiac sarcoidosis detection and treatment using existing technologies.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Elliott Crouser, Subha Raman, Nabeel Hamzeh, Lisa Maier

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-4 net votes
2 up votes
6 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Does epinephrine improve outcomes in OHCA

Epinephrine is the primary drug that is used in resuscitation but observational studies and a few small RCT suggest that it improves short term but not long term outcomes. Factors such as timing, dose, quality fo CPR and post-resuscitation care all confound the issue. Large RCTs conducted at multiple centers are desperately needed to address this question.

Submitted by (@dayam0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

If short terms outcomes are improved but not long term outcomes, we are only adding costs and not improving population health

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Will require a large prehospital clinical trials network and ideally also a current national registry of OHCA to address secular changes in other confounding variables

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Mohamud Daya

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1 net vote
3 up votes
2 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Cardiovascular dysfunction in geriatric trauma patients

There is too little research funding addressing cardiovascular dysfunction in geriatric trauma patients. There have been little interest in funding this work. Yet, the geriatric population is growing. Geriatric trauma patients are predominantly women. Historically, the trauma societies provide guidance for diagnosis and treatment of severe trauma. However, "trauma guidance" historically was the same for children, ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Document and understand the role of cardiac dysfunction in contributing to morbidity and mortality of geriatric trauma patients.

 

Reduce mortality rates in geriatric trauma patients.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Little research has been conducted to understand the role of cardiac dysfunction in elderly trauma patients. These patients may be intubated and treated with pain meds, so the normal symptoms of cardiac ischemia are silenced. Because 12 lead ECGs or cardiac enzymes are not routinely collected in these patients after admission, the question is what types of cardiac dysfunction occur and can they be prevented?

 

While evidence is scant, we conducted a structured chart review of WMD Shock Trauma patients' medical records in fiscal year 1999 data. Mean age was 76 and mean ISS of 24. In reviewing charts we found 71% of patients had one or more risk factors for ischemic heart disease (beyond age) and 30% had a history of ischemic heart disease. On admission 29% had ECG changes consistent with acute cardiac ischemia, but ischemic changes were noted equally between patients with and without a history of IHD. Cardiac enzymes were ordered for 45% of patients and 19% were positive. We found that patients with acute cardiac ischemia on admission (ECG or enzymes) had more adverse in-hospital cardiac events than those without ischemia on admission. Patients experiencing adverse events were significantly more likely to die.

 

We believe these findings suggest a substantial role of cardiac dysfunction in this population, but we were unable to generate interest in the topic.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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1 up votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Cellular & molecular effects of diabetes on the heart

Diabetes increases cardiovascular disease risk factors. Evidence suggests that diabetes alters contractile and electrical function of the heart, but little is known about the cellular and molecular basis for these changes.

Submitted by (@catherine.proenza)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Develop more effective treatments for cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

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21 net votes
36 up votes
15 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Cardiac rehabilitation in congenital heart disease

Does cardiac rehabilitation in children with Fontan physiology increase exercise capacity over the long term?

What are the benefits? What is the appropriate dose? What other CHD populations may benefit from cardiac rehabilitation?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Improve functional capacity and quality of life of patients with congenital heart disease.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Preliminary data has been promising but larger clinical trials are needed.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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-3 net votes
10 up votes
13 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Fibrosis Across Organs: Bringing Together Investigators of Fibrosis of the Heart, Lungs and Bone Marrow

Fibrosis can affect essentially any tissue or organ, including the heart, lungs and bone marrow. Effective anti-fibrotic therapy has long been elusive, and transplantation has been the only therapy capable of restoring patient function as fibrotic diseases progress to organ failure. Although these diseases present clinically with organ-specific manifestations, they are now thought to share many common pathogenetic mechanisms. ...more »

Submitted by (@amtager)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

In the aggregate, diseases characterized by fibrosis have been estimated to account for up to 45% of developed world deaths. Fibrotic diseases addressed by the NHLBI include heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and myelofibrosis (MF), among many others. Each fibrotic disease represents an area of great unmet clinical need, as patients suffer and die with no or limited effective disease-modifying therapies. The impact of developing effective therapies for each of these diseases individually would be great; the impact of developing therapies effective for the entire class of fibrotic diseases across organs would truly be enormous. The clinical burden of HFpEF is staggering – more than 650,000 new patients are diagnosed with heart failure in the US each year, half with diastolic dysfunction. Although not as prevalent, IPF and MF are particularly lethal. IPF has a median survival of approximately three years. MF is arguably the most aggressive of the myeloproliferative disorders and is associated with significantly shortened survival. Although agents such as spironolactone have been unable to treat fibrosis in HFpEF as yet, two anti-fibrotic drugs, pirfenidone and nintedanib, have now been shown to slow progression of IPF, and the oral JAK1/2 inhibitor ruxolitinib has been shown to improve MF survival. These early successes underscore the great impact that developing effective anti-fibrotic therapies will have.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

This challenge could be addressed by funding research efforts to identify and therapeutically target fundamental pathogenetic mechanisms shared by fibrotic diseases across organs. Although fibrotic diseases present clinically with organ-specific manifestations, there has been a growing appreciation of that these diseases share many aspects of their pathogenesis. Fibrosis In many of these diseases results from recurrent or non-resolving epithelial or endothelial injury, followed by over-exuberant or aberrant mesenchymal cell responses. Across all organs, these processes result in the pathologic accumulation of fibroblasts and extracellular matrix, with distortion of organ architecture and loss of organ function. Core pathways leading to epithelial and endothelial cell injury and senescence, to fibroblast accumulation and persistence, and to altered matrix biochemical and biomechanical properties, are now being identified. Therapeutics developed to target these core pathways could have broad clinical applicability. Funding initiatives aimed at better the characterization of core fibrotic pathways already identified, the identification of new core fibrotic pathways, and the development of therapies to target core fibrotic pathways, could allow the NHLBI to simultaneously and cost-effectively address the great unmet needs of the large patients with any of the many devastating fibrotic diseases that affect the heart, lungs and bone marrow.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Andrew M. Tager

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16 net votes
20 up votes
4 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Fundamental stress-response mechanisms in the heart.

What are the primary molecules and cellular signals associated with prolonged hypertensive stress that cause adverse myocardial tissue remodeling, and what strategies that prevent or reverse adverse remodeling can be developed and tested?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Could potentially contribute to the development of new therapies for heart disease and cardiomyopathies.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Yes, addressing this CQ may be feasible. Since it is likely that a multitude of signaling mechanisms are involved, an unbiased, global approach may be necessary to identify the key molecular pathways. However, experimental challenges remain and even developing appropriate animal models has been challenging.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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14 net votes
21 up votes
7 down votes
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