Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Training and mentor support in global health

Why can’t all training grants (T, K, etc) be opened out to all people working in US institutions, regardless of citizenship or green-card?

Why can’t we establish mechanisms for US junior investigators and mentors interested in global NHLBI areas?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Current policy does not allow non-citizens and green-card holders to apply for most K and T grants. However, given the changing nature of US workforce, this policy needs to change. Current mechanisms do not easily enable US investigators to get support for global work……training and/or research.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Why not?

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : K.M. Venkat Narayan

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4 up votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Improve vascular healing and extend long term benefit of interventions

How can we develop new approaches to improve vascular healing and extend the long term benefits of vascular interventions for more patients?

Submitted by (@societyforvascularsurgery)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

­The response to vascular injury, whether it be catheter interventions, bypass surgery, or chronic implants, is a reactive process characterized by inflammation, cell proliferation, and fibrosis leading to failure. Better understanding of the mechanisms of vessel remodeling, and restoring homeostasis, is needed to improve prediction, develop and translate new treatments. This remains the leading scientific problem in vascular medicine and surgery. New approaches such as proteomics, lipidomics, molecular imaging offer new opportunities in this realm.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Society for Vascular Surgery

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1 up votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Theoretical division of NHLBI

Many functional physiology, cellular physiology , electrophysiology, and other aspects are amenable to rigorous mathematical methods.NHLBI lacks a theoretical division where IDEAS expressed mathematically make testable predictions at multi scale levels. NHLBI LACKS A THEORETICAL DIVISION- although history has shown that virtually all original ideas have a mathematically expressible foundation, particularly when dynamic, ...more »

Submitted by (@sjk000)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

the impact is obvious in the sense that predicton based on theory can lead to new discovery

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Sandor j Kovacs

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12 up votes
25 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Prodromal symptoms and signs of a heart attack/acute coronary syndrome

Can early warning symptoms and signs of a heart attack (acute coronary syndrome) be quantified through standardized symptom surveys, biochemical measures, electrocardiographic, or other diagnostic means to enable earlier evaluation and treatment?

Submitted by (@mmhand)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

If patients could detect symptoms that have been demonstrated prospectively to herald an impending heart attack and/or if there were sensitive biochemical, electrocardiographic, or other tests that could be performed by patients/bystanders (e.g., in the home setting), by emergency medical services personnel, primary care providers or others in community settings to assist with decision support about seeking intervention for early symptoms/signs of an acute coronary syndrome, this would potentially save thousands of lives from heart attacks and sudden cardiac death.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Prodromal heart attack symptoms (waxing and waning of symptoms in advance of complete vessel occlusion) have not been prospectively described or quantified. The standard symptom constellations from epidemiologic surveys have been described for heart attack symptoms (ACS) though there is variability in symptom data collection among heart attack surveys as well. Also while there are biochemical tests for muscle damage (troponin), there is not a biochemical test for ischemia such as could be applied in the home or work setting. Similarly it would be helpful if a self-applied electrocardiogram by patients/bystanders could give a diagnosis of early ischemia (prior to occlusion) so patients could seek observational care.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Mary Hand

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1 up votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Making R01 funding work for the Medical Sciences

We need to spread R01 funding around more to ensure that the best science has funding adequate to move forward. To do this I believe changing how we think about R01 funding and expenditures can be used to put the NIH funds to better use. Too often successful researchers have the majority of their salaries on R01s and the institutions have little skin in the game. PI salaries can be a large part of the escalating budget ...more »

Submitted by (@wjones7)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

The impact of spreading the funding would be to improve funding rates, improve funding of new investigators, and supporting more diverse science. Negative impacts would include reduced funding some large labs. In my experience, in some cases, this would be a good thing. There could be special programs and exceptions for large labs that make significant important contributions and serve as resources to reduce negative impact. Review of grants should include information on manuscript retractions and large labs with many retractions should be carefully scrutinized for defunding.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Such changes would have to be made incrementally over time since this will require states and institutions to pick up some of the cost of science and therefore must be phased in to allow for time to adjust the workforce in specific places to align with budgetary constraints. Institutions might be encouraged to do more fundraising to actually support science to fill gaps.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Keith Jones with major input from Pieter de Tombe

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28 net votes
44 up votes
16 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Does epinephrine improve outcomes in OHCA

Epinephrine is the primary drug that is used in resuscitation but observational studies and a few small RCT suggest that it improves short term but not long term outcomes. Factors such as timing, dose, quality fo CPR and post-resuscitation care all confound the issue. Large RCTs conducted at multiple centers are desperately needed to address this question.

Submitted by (@dayam0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

If short terms outcomes are improved but not long term outcomes, we are only adding costs and not improving population health

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Will require a large prehospital clinical trials network and ideally also a current national registry of OHCA to address secular changes in other confounding variables

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Mohamud Daya

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3 up votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

RFA on EC-cardiomyocyte interactions in the mechanisms and treatments of cardiovascular diseases

Often under recognized, the cardiac endothelial cells are highly abundant in the heart, and may have important roles in modulating cardiac function, besides simply serving as structural component of blood vessels. Evidences of ours and others have indicated an emerging role of cardiac endothelial cells signaling to cardiomyocytes to mediate important pathophysiological responses. Nonetheless, detailed mechanisms of ...more »

Submitted by (@hcai00)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Successfully addressing this question would no double reveal novel mechanisms and ways of monitoring treatment responses of cardiovascular disease, ultimately leading to novel drug targets, valuable biomarkers and extended new directions of basic research as well.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Tools of studying these cells are mostly available. Both adult cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells from the heart can be isolated and cultured, although cardiomyotyes need to used within 24 hrs and cannot be passaged. However successful preparation of these cells from WT and transgenic animals would permit co-culture experiments and mechanistic studies. These cells can also be studied using in-situ techniques either detecting molecular changes/events or dynamic interactions. Potential challenges would side in selective targeting of these cells, for example, either ECs or cardiomyocytes, once a potential therapeutic is in the testing. Nonetheless, PECAM-ab conjugated techniques have been employed to specifically deliver proteins to endothelial cells, so I am confident most of the challenges can be worked out, particularly within a RFA awardees group with frequent exchanges of ideas.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Hua Linda Cai, University of California Los Angeles

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30 up votes
3 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Develop common-sense standards for obesity research

Obesity research is riddled with methodological problems that are rarely challenged, leading to the perpetuation of misinformation and interventions that do harm. Given the two-thirds of the population who are classified as higher weight and thus subject to these interventions, it is past time to clean up the basic scientific flaws in this research area. For a quick summary of a couple of these issues, see Poodle Science: ...more »

Submitted by (@dbdb00)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

This subject really is both CG and CC. The CQ aspect is to see past the weight bias and stigma we are all subject to in order to see diversity of weight as normal, even as people across the weight spectrum suffer health insults from sources that are rarely investigated within the medical model (cf social determinants of health). The CC aspect is the enormous economic and cultural pressures to maintain the valuing of some bodies over others in order to sell products and create a group of people who have fewer ways to defend themselves from oppression.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Several key areas could make a big difference and they are quite feasible.

1. Require researchers to have studied weight bias and stigma so they are more aware of their own potential proclivities to frame research questions or results according to the status quo.

2. Require any study that claims a weight loss finding to have, report, and publish followup data on all participants at least 2-5 years post-intervention.

3. Require any study claiming a health issue related to weight to compare not higher and lower weight people, but rather higher weight people who have pursued weight loss and higher weight people who have not, since there is no way for higher weight people to be always-been-thinner.

4. Require weight/health research to control for obvious confounders such as weight cycling, SES, exposure to weight stigma, exposure to weight discrimination, exposure to racism, exposure to stress, lack of access to unbiased medical care, etc.

5. Require that journals allowing statements in the abstract or discussion or conclusions that generalize beyond the data be accountable, and that journals provide an accurate translation of the findings for journalists complete with statements about limitations of findings and possible alternative interpretations.

6. Fund projects which are about listening, especially to people who are rarely asked about their lived experience, in order to generate better research that actually improves quality of life for higher-weight people.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Deb Burgard, PhD

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24 net votes
44 up votes
20 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Direct thrombin inhibitors and anti-Xa (Ten A) inhibitors in trauma patients - physiologic effects and impact on outcomes

Direct thrombin inhibitors and anti-Xa (Ten A) inhibitors are new, undetectable and irreversible. We have no data on how well these drugs correlate with current measures of coagulopathy such as thromboelastography, or whether antifibrinolytics should be used in patients who are on these drugs. These drugs may increase incidence of traumatic brain injury after minor injury. They are also going to be used increasingly in ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Understanding pathophysiology of coagulopathy in trauma patients due to these drugs may lead to innovations in management of coagulopathy and help increase our ability to predict/prognostic poor clinical outcomes in patients on these new anticoagulants, detect these drugs in a timely manner and develop antidotes/reversal agents. 

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

These are eminently feasible with adequate support from the NHLBI. Challenges will be finding collaborations or institutions that have enough clinical volume and adequate basic science/translational research infrastructure to look at these questions seriously.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Sudha Jayaraman

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6 up votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Developing adherence research to reduce unnecessary mobility/mortality/cost

From Cochrane Review NOV 20 2014 RB Haynes “It is uncertain how medicine adherence can consistently be improved so that the full health benefits of medicines can be realized. We need more advanced methods for researching ways to improve medicine adherence, including better interventions, better ways of measuring adherence, and studies that include sufficient patients to draw conclusions on clinically important effects.” ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Effective medication exists to prevent or control most chronic diseases. The problem is that patients do not follow medical recommendations for a myriad of reasons. UNNECESSARY mortality, morbidity, poor quality of life and cost are the result of nonadherence. Intensive systematic research over a decade is the key to address the proposed challenge.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

I have developed an hypothesis, currently being examined in a controlled study by NIHLBI, that merits further evaluation. One component(J Allergy Clin Immunol: In Practice 2013;1:23) is objective measuring of asthma patients with MDI electronic monitors that need technological improvement (battery life, measure inspiration). Patients evaluated in emergency department for most chronic diseases can be objectively evaluated for adherence by assays of medication that currently are available since they exist and necessary for medication to be approved by the FDA. Other components include: coordinated identification of patient barriers; application of clinical decision support strategies to specific barriers identified; patient-centered communication skills to deliver strategies in one delivery system. Many other interventions by other researchers may also be considered during the decade.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Andrew Weinstein and Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America

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5 net votes
7 up votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Develop relevant large animal models for various disease conditions

What is the possibility of investing funds primarily in clinically-relevant models where the findings could be translated in to human diseases?

Submitted by (@dkagr0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Strong emphasis on the use of a clinically-relevant large animal model would hopefully be more productive in developing better therapeutic approaches and management of patients.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

In view of the lack of facility at many institutions and the cost involved, and the rules and regulations by the USDA and other regularity bodies, special emphasis will be required to build the animal facility at an institution. Where will the funds come from? Similar to many other core facilities set up by the NIH at various institutions, what is the possibility of developing specialized centers for testing a new idea in a clinically-relevant large animal facility?

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Devendra K. Agrawal, PhD

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11 up votes
16 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Reproducibility Initiatives in Heart, Lung and Blood Research

Scientists feel tremendous pressure to publish numerous scientific papers in order to receive NIH funding and tenure at academic institutions. Cognitive biases of scientists and publication biases of journals that publish this barrage of papers will likely result in the publication of findings that are probably not reproducible (see "Why Most Published Research Findings Are False" by John P. A. Ioannidis in PLOS Medicine ...more »

Submitted by (@jalees)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

By distinguishing research findings which are reproducible from those which aren't, researchers will be able to build future research programs on solid scientific foundations.

 

There are many reasons for why research may not be reproducible, ranging from simple biological variations (cells from one supplier may behave differently than cells from a different supplier) to conscious/unconscious biases or misconduct. No matter what the underlying cause is, irreproducible research findings that are not recognized as such will result in a tremendous waste of time and resources. Graduate students or postdoctoral trainees may waste entire years of their precious training period conducting experiments that are based on published papers which may turn out to be irreproducible.

 

NHLBI could significantly improve the quality of research by building an infrastructure that supports the assessment of reproducibility and widely shares these findings.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

One of the challenges for assessing reproducibility of published work is that it is considered not very innovative and there is no funding available. NIH grants are awarded to highly innovative proposals which venture into new territories and not proposals which want to confirm the validity of published work. However, the returns of investing into reproducibility testing might be enormous because irreproducible results would be identified and weeded out, thus preventing loss of resources and time.

 

The NHLBI could develop funding mechanisms specifically designed to support research proposals that will test the reproducibility of high impact findings that have not yet been independently verified. The study sections would review these proposals using novel criteria designed for such studies. The emphasis of the study section review would lie on questions such as "Is this an important enough question that it merits reproducibility testing?" instead of the traditional "Is this a cutting-edge technology that nobody has previously used?"

 

Challenges would include identifying journals that would published results of these studies and agreeing on what constitutes reproducibility (i.e. is it enough if the major conclusion or effect is reproduced even though the effect size may be very different?).

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Jalees Rehman

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5 up votes
3 down votes
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