Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Development of right ventricular-targeted therapies in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a complex, progressive condition characterized by high blood pressure in the lungs and restriction of flow through the pulmonary arterial system. A great increase in the treatment armamentarium has been noted for this rare disease in the past 20 years, with 12 new PAH-targeted therapies. Though these therapies do improve cardiac performance, this is most likely due to their primary ...more »

Submitted by (@katherinek)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Pulmonary rehabilitation

Can pulmonary rehabilitation change the course of COPD? Is pulmonary rehabilitation a disease-modifying therapy? Does pulmonary rehabilitation improve survival? Does pulmonary rehabilitation reduce readmissions?

Submitted by (@makeb0)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Increasing Regenerative Medical Strategies in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a complex, progressive condition characterized by high blood pressure in the lungs and restriction of flow through the pulmonary arterial system. Current PAH therapies mainly act of the vasoconstrictive component of the disease; however there is a widely accepted view that another contributor to the disease is an abnormal overgrowth of cells that line the pulmonary arteries, which ...more »

Submitted by (@michaelg)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

How can we non-invasively, but still accurately, measure blood pressure in the pulmonary arteries?

Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a complex, progressive condition characterized by high blood pressure in the lungs. The gold standard for measuring pressures in the pulmonary arteries is a right heart catheterization, where a special catheter is guided through the right side of the heart and into the pulmonary artery, the main vessel carrying blood to the lungs. This measurement is essential, as it allows physicians and ...more »

Submitted by (@katherinek)

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

What is the comparative effectiveness of short-term vs. chronic (e.g., 12 mo) pulmonary rehabilitation?

What is the comparative effectiveness of short-term vs. chronic (e.g. 12 mos) pulmonary rehabilitation on survival, patient-reported outcomes (symptom frequency, activities of daily living, quality of life, sleep quality, exacerbations), healthcare utilization, and costs from a societal and healthcare system perspective?

Submitted by (@jakris)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Developing Standards of Care for adult muscular dystrophy (FSHD, DM) patients affected by hypercarbic respiratory insufficiency

There is an unmet need for the NHLBI to foster basic, preclinical and clinical research on the pulmonary consequences of respiratory insufficiency, and specifically with hypercarbic (high CO2) respiratory insufficiency, in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) and other adult muscular dystrophies. The adult muscular dystrophies have received insufficient attention, both from research and clinical practice perspectives. ...more »

Submitted by (@daniel.perez)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Identification and validation of surrogate endpoints for long-term morbidity in Sickle Cell Disease

Research in sickle cell disease (SCD) has mostly focused on preventing or treating acute medical events, such as vaso-occlusive pain, acute chest syndrome, and, in pediatric patients, acute strokes. Chronic SCD complications such as chronic kidney disease or pulmonary hypertension, develop over decades, thus are poor choices for clinical trial endpoints. There is a great need to develop surrogate endpoints that predict ...more »

Submitted by (@hulbertm)

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16 up votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Regenerative Medicine 2.0 in Heart and Lung Research - Back to the Drawing Board

Stem cell therapies have been quite successful in hematologic disease but the outcomes of clinical studies using stem cells for cardiopulmonary disease have been rather modest. Explanations for this discrepancy such as the fact that our blood has a high rate of physiologic, endogenous turnover and regeneration whereas these processes occur at far lower rates in the heart and lung. Furthermore, hematopoietic stem cells ...more »

Submitted by (@jalees)

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