Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Develop Targeted Therapeutics to Treat Venous Thrombosis and Inflammation in Venous Thromboembolism

Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) afflicts nearly a million Americans yearly, has a mortality of 6-12% and has costs of more than $15 billion. Current treatment regimens, systemic anticoagulation and compression stockings, fail patients in multiple ways: risk of major bleeding episodes; failure of clot resolution in up to 50% of patients; failure to prevent the development of post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) in up to 40% of ...more »

Submitted by (@chanduvem)

Voting

4 net votes
6 up votes
2 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

How can we more safely deliver stem cells to Sickle Cell patients

Newer therapies using gene correction, rather than gene addition, are needed for sickle cell disease. Even with this potential advantage, there needs to be a way to safely deliver gene corrected HSC to the sickle cell patient. Chemotherapy is poorly tolerated, and often is the reason patients do not choose the BMT option. What is the status of other less toxic non myeloablative approaches, and how can they best be ...more »

Submitted by (@freddigoldman)

Voting

51 net votes
67 up votes
16 down votes
Active

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Embedding the future of regenerative medicine into the open epigenomic landscape of pluripotent human embryonic stem cells

Large-scale profiling of developmental regulators and histone modifications by genome-wide approaches have provided powerful genome-wide, high-throughput, and high resolution techniques that lead to great advances in our understanding of the global phenomena of human developmental processes. However, without a practical strategy to convert pluripotent cells direct into a specific lineage, previous studies are limited ...more »

Submitted by (@xuejunparsons)

Voting

-24 net votes
9 up votes
33 down votes
Active

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Deriving Cardiac Elements from Pluripotent Human embryonic Stem Cells for Heart Reconstitution

to date, the existing markets lack a clinically-suitable human cardiomyocyte source with adequate myocardium regenerative potential, which has been the major setback in developing safe and effective cell-based therapies for regenerating the damaged human heart in cardiovascular disease.

Submitted by (@xuejunparsons)

Voting

-33 net votes
10 up votes
43 down votes
Active