(@ewong0)

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Development of Novel Apheresis Adsorption Technologies to More Effectively and Safely Treat Hematologic Diseases

Current FDA approved apheresis technology currently uses elutriation/centrifugation separation techniques to remove pathologic cellular and/or plasma elements. These techniques are non-specific, limited by inefficient removal kinetics and often require considerable blood product exposure. Despite tremendous improvement in our understanding of the pathophysiology of a variety of disease, our ability to treat many of ...more »

Voting

93 net votes
112 up votes
19 down votes
Active
(@j.m.miano)

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Integrating New Genomic Discoveries with Genome Editing Towards Personalized Medicine

The human genome is a veritable digital library of information that includes millions of regulatory elements and the expansive classes of long and short noncoding RNAs. These noncoding sequences represent a rich source of sequence variation (eg, SNPs), but the role such sequence variants play in the control of gene expression or noncoding RNA function is poorly understood. Many noncoding sequence variants will prove to ...more »

Voting

6 net votes
16 up votes
10 down votes
Active
(@edward.fisher)

Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Distribution of funding

As long as funding remains at grossly inadequate levels, to distribute the research money more fairly, limit the total dollar amount any PI can receive. It should be a reasonably large number in order to fund multiple good ideas that are peer-evaluated, but small enough to allow more PIs to get funding.

Voting

46 net votes
54 up votes
8 down votes
Active
(@bsachais)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Apheresis Medicine in the Management of Sickle Cell Disease

Despite advances in care, patients with sickle cell disease have significant morbidity and mortality. One challenge is the optimal use of simple vs exchange transfusion vs no transfusion when managing these patients. Simple transfusions lead to iron overload while exchange transfusions may expose patients to increase numbers of red blood cell units. The mechanism of benefit from transfusion (oxygen delivery vs marrow ...more »

Voting

130 net votes
152 up votes
22 down votes
Active
(@mmarques)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

The role of Extracorporeal Photopheresis (ECP) in the prevention and treatment of rejection of heart and lung transplants

According to the ISHLT, more than 4,000 patients undergo a heart transplant each year, and almost 4,000 receive single or double lung transplants. Their prognosis depends heavily on the avoidance of rejection, which claims the majority of their lives. For heart transplant recipients, the median survival is 11 years, while for lung transplant recipients, it is approximately 5 years. The current most common anti-rejection ...more »

Voting

80 net votes
102 up votes
22 down votes
Active
(@stephen.fortmann)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Addressing the population-level determinants of CVD

Atherosclerotic CVD is an epidemic disease that is determined primarily by the social and physical environments acting in part through risk factor distributions. To date most preventive efforts have been in the clinical setting, using medications for risk factors. As useful as this is, a much better solution is to deal with the behavioral contributors to risk and their social determinants, including strong destructive ...more »

Voting

7 net votes
22 up votes
15 down votes
Active
(@teitelbaum)

Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Credible Data and Analysis of the Biomedical Research Workforce

There is a need for sensible policies that require collection and scientific analysis of credible data relating to the biomedical workforce. The data currently available are weak – for example no one knows, to a factor of 2X, the actual number of postdocs in the United States. The absence of credible human resource and labor market data on the biomedical research workforce is very surprising. NIH could contribute greatly ...more »

Voting

6 net votes
15 up votes
9 down votes
Active
(@teitelbaum)

Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Predictable and Steady Funding Growth

There is a need for a predictable, steady expansion of funding of NIH. The repetitive booms and busts in research funding are a primary source of the current instability of the biomedical research and training systems. Funding goals should not be simply “more”, or another “doubling”, but instead a trajectory of steady expansion of research funding that can be sustained over the medium-to-long term.

Voting

28 net votes
32 up votes
4 down votes
Active
(@teitelbaum)

Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Moderating Positive Feedback between Research Funding and PhD/postdoc Numbers

A critical challenge will be to limit future destabilizing expansion of the number of PhD students and postdoc trainees. Because 75-80% of biomedical PhD students and postdocs now supported by NIH are funded by RO1 and other research funding, if/when research grant budget increase the number of PhD and postdoc “slots” would automatically expand--even if there is no expectation of comparable increases in demand for ...more »

Voting

5 net votes
15 up votes
10 down votes
Active
(@teitelbaum)

Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Align PhD Content with Careers Available to Recent PhDs

There is a need to create better alignment between the content of biomedical PhD programs and the careers that actually are available to those who have earned PhDs. Though available data are surprisingly weak, all the evidence suggests that only a small fraction (perhaps 15%) of current biomedical PhDs and postdocs are likely to find stable careers in academic research. Larger proportions are more likely to be employed ...more »

Voting

4 net votes
14 up votes
10 down votes
Active
(@teitelbaum)

Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Make PhD Career Paths More Transparent

A critical challenge will be making career paths transparent to prospective PhD students and postdocs. At present, few departments, programs and institutions are collecting and making readily available any credible data about the career experiences of their past graduates. To be useful, such data should address at least five years of post-PhD career experience; shorter-term data is likely to be dominated by postdoctoral ...more »

Voting

11 net votes
21 up votes
10 down votes
Active