(@jnoel0)

Goal 1: Promote Human Health

DESIGN AND EVALUATE INTERVENTION STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE SLEEP HEALTH AND CIRCADIAN DISRUPTION

Data indicate the association between short sleep and circadian disruption on a number of adverse outcomes such as cardiovascular disease, metabolic disorders, hypertension, etc. There is a need to move beyond association to interventions that can be shown to improve sleep duration and circadian disruption.

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205 net votes
250 up votes
45 down votes
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(@peter0)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Elucidate the different causes of circadian disorders, and tailor the treatment to the cause

There are several possible physiological causes of Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders (CRSWDs), including lack of sensitivity to light, over-sensitivity to light, deficiencies in the ipRGC cells of the retina, lack of melatonin production, long elimination time of melatonin, long intrinsic circadian period, differences in timing of sleep relative to internal circadian rhythms, differences in tolerance to phase mismatch,... more »

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47 net votes
58 up votes
11 down votes
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(@jnoel0)

Goal 1: Promote Human Health

ELUCIDATING BASIC MECHANISMS OF SLEEP DEFICIENCY AND CIRCADIAN DISRUPTION ON HEALTH THROUGH THE LIFESPAN

There are developing data from clinical studies that sleep deficiency and circadian disruption have multiple adverse consequences for health. The clinical data provide the base for mechanistic studies. Studies in animal models indicate that both circadian disruption and insufficient sleep later gene expression in peripheral tissues. Moreover, the effect of sleep loss in molecular changes in brain changes with age.... more »

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174 net votes
230 up votes
56 down votes
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(@jnoel0)

Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Identify genetic variants of sleep/circadian disorders

Most aspects of variation in sleep and circadian rhythm are heritable. Moreover, all common sleep disorders aggregate in families. The response to sleep loss is also a highly heritable trait. Identifying gene variants for these disorders will elaborate new molecular pathways that could be targets for future interventions.

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84 net votes
117 up votes
33 down votes
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(@susanpl)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Improve ineffective treatments for circadian rhythm disorders

I have extreme delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD), a circadian rhythm disorder (CRD). I fall asleep at dawn and wake up early afternoon. My dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) is at 5:30 am. A normal person’s DLMO may be at 9 pm, for example. CRD treatment—prolonged bright light after temperature nadir, dark restriction/melatonin starting several hours before natural bedtime, darkness till temperature nadir—does not work... more »

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75 net votes
103 up votes
28 down votes
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(@jnoel0)

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

NEW INFRASTRUCTURE FOR CLINICAL RESEARCH IN SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN DISORDERS

Much of the current clinical research on sleep and circadian research depends on cohorts designed for other purposes. While this has been helpful, such studies have limitations. These limitations are related to availability of in-depth phenotyping data and questions as to whether individuals identified in population studies are equivalent to those who present clinically with specific disorders. These concerns could... more »

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126 net votes
186 up votes
60 down votes
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(@nma120)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Understanding of chronobiological systems

We know that all life functions are based on circadian and other rhythms; chronobiological systems are interdependent in intricate ways. Disturbances and disorders in one part of a system may affect other vital systems in unexpected but far-reaching ways. Many aspects of circadian rhythms and sleep-wake regulation in normal, healthy humans have been charted. Much of the knowledge thus gained is assumed to be valid also... more »

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1 net vote
1 up votes
0 down votes
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(@jnoel0)

Goal 1: Promote Human Health

INVESTIGATE DIFFERENTIAL VULNERABILITY TO SLEEP DEFICIENCY AND CIRCADIAN DISRUPTION

Studies in different subjects have shown that there are major individual differences in response to sleep loss and circadian disruption. Twin studies have shown that this is heritable. There needs to be an intensive effort to assess basis of these individual differences. This could include in-depth phenotyping studies, e.g., neuroimaging, genetic studies, “-omic” studies, epigenetic changes, etc.

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155 net votes
213 up votes
58 down votes
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