(@jiang001)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

What about the impact of regulation of genes in response to external stimulation on human health

We are focusing a lot on the genes that may be protective or harmful to our lives. But what about the regulation of genes in response to external stimulations, such as psychosocial and/or environmental, that are probably more accountable for whether we live healthier or not.

Voting

-4 net votes
5 up votes
9 down votes
Active
(@mariannes.clancy)

Goal 1: Promote Human Health

How do Circulating Precursor Endothelial Cells contribute to newly formed vessels

Endothelial cells derive from cells in the bone marrow. Circulating precursor endothelial cells contribute to newly forming vessels.

Do Alk 1 and/or Endogln mutations affect the functions of these cells once they incorporate into growing vessels. These vessels then go on to form arteriovenous malformations

Voting

2 net votes
2 up votes
0 down votes
Active
(@echenum)

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Advanced Models for Translational Cardiovascular Research and Drug Development

Although the study of the cardiovascular (CV) system has benefited significantly from the use of gene-targeted and transgenic mouse models, small rodents do not always accurately reflect human cardiovascular physiology. Many discoveries using mouse CVD models failed to translate into human applications.

Voting

11 net votes
16 up votes
5 down votes
Active
(@gko000)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Role of epigenetic mechanisms in cardiovascular disease

Are epigenetic changes the cause or the consequence of changes in cell function that contribute to cardiovascular disease? If they are the cause, what are the mechanisms that lead to changes and how do they impact disease pathogenesis? If the consequence, do they play any role in disease pathogenesis? What methods can be used to test if epigenetic changes play a causal role in disease pathogenesis? Thus far studies... more »

Voting

21 net votes
28 up votes
7 down votes
Active
(@tantillo)

Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Promoting health through simultaneous prevention of obesity and eating disorders

How to best promote healthy weight while also not stigmatizing obesity and creating risk for eating disorders (i.e., weight concern and body dissatisfaction) in youth. How to tackle both without contributing in unwitting way to development of either.

Voting

62 net votes
116 up votes
54 down votes
Active
(@patty.gladowski)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Treatment Options for Diabetics and Impact on Cardiovascular Health

As a clinician, over the years I have noted major differences in adverse cardiovascular outcomes in diabetics who are treated with insulin +/- oral agents compared to those only treated with oral agents. Cardiovascular events occur much less often and at a much later timeframe in diabetics ("Type 2/adult onset") treated with insulin as the primary method. Even with newer agents, there may be slight improvement, but... more »

Voting

3 net votes
7 up votes
4 down votes
Active
(@wheeze)

Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Environmental Exposures and Atopic Disease

As the current chair of the Research and Training Division, I would like to convey that the AAAAI membership would like the NHLBI to consider the following in the development of its strategic plan:

 

What are the molecular and cellular responses in the lung that occur after environmental stimuli (including allergens) that predict homeostatic resilience or transition to atopic diseases?

Voting

-7 net votes
8 up votes
15 down votes
Active
(@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Goal 1: Promote Human Health

The coupling of mechanical stress to biochemistry, molecular biology and electrophysiology

Cells aren’t beakers holding soluble reactants waiting to be mixed. Cells are structured objects where life forms as a flow of free energy between three pools: chemical, electrical and mechanical. Most papers in the literature ignore structure (except of Xray or EM of specific proteins) and almost all ignore the coupling of mechanics to the other pools. Cells cannot be studied with in vitro experiments. We can study single... more »

Voting

9 net votes
29 up votes
20 down votes
Active
(@shoemajd)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

PUFA Toxicity

Our diets contain 20 times more omega-6 fatty acids than the diets of humans before agriculture, industrial solvent extraction of seed oils and hydrogenation. These acids including linoleic and arachidonic acids are precursors to eicosanoids that mediate inflammation and blood clotting and the amount in our diet has been shown to correlate with negative health outcomes. Should NHLBI fund more research into the effects... more »

Voting

-4 net votes
9 up votes
13 down votes
Active
(@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

The Investigator's Catch-22: How Can NHLBI Help?

The Critical Challenge is to determine how NHLBI can continue to foster the translational research necessary to allow our researchers to further develop their NHLBI-funded basic science discoveries. Researchers can't readily get a "typical" grant to perform the preclinical and early clinical translational IND-enabling research, and also can't yet attract private sector support without having done the work to "de-risk"... more »

Voting

10 net votes
21 up votes
11 down votes
Active
(@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Global cohorts to fill gaps in knowledge

Given the global burden of disease, what does NHLBI plan to do to establish a diverse global cohort to connect basic sciences to population health, in a way that differences in phenotypes around the world can be studied rapidly? For example, why not start by supporting a coalition of cohorts originally funded by the Global Heart Initiative?

Voting

-8 net votes
5 up votes
13 down votes
Active
(@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Implementation of Evidence-based Guidelines in LMICs

How can implementation strategies be tested in low and middle income countries for contextually and culturally adapted evidence-based clinical care guidelines with a focus on prevalent non-communicable diseases with large burdens such as sickle cell disease, hypertension, heart disease, stroke, asthma, and COPD?

Voting

-10 net votes
8 up votes
18 down votes
Active
(@cjoseph)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Consequences of ABO or Rh Type Specific versus Non-Type Specific Platelet Transfusions

What are the consequences, clinically and immunologically, of ABO or Rh type specific vs. non-type specific platelet transfusions? There is widely varying practice as to ABO and Rh matching of platelets for transfusion. Most studies demonstrate that use of ABO unmatched (non-identical) platelets are associated with increased 1) platelet refractoriness (small randomized trials), 2) red cell transfusion needs and hemolysis,... more »

Voting

-4 net votes
25 up votes
29 down votes
Active