(@jgrima)

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

How can we determine a patient’s risk of a life-threatening aortic dissection?

Even though science and technology has advanced, many of the advancements have not met the critical challenge of making significant changes in patient therapies for improved outcomes and thus have not been able to break through the translational barrier. In today’s world, risk of aortic dissection is still based purely on a crude size measurement. It is true that evidence indicates that aortic root aneurysm above 4.5 ...more »

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(@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Detection of rupture prone small aortic aneurysms

Critical challenges in the assessment of aortic aneurysms are: (1) Availability of reliable animal models that simulate the human pathology, (2) Availability of molecular imaging resources – identification of biomarkers, development of targeted imaging probes and pre-clinical imaging methods, and plasma markers that predict whether an aneurysm is prone to rupture or dissection, (3) Bringing together a wide array of multi-disciplinary ...more »

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(@dstrickland)

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Molecular determinants of vascular wall development and aneurysm formation that can be used as markers for early diagnosis

To increase the potential of translating basic research discoveries into the clinic, there is a need to discover molecular biomarkers that confer risk for aneurysms and vascular dissections. The creation of a nation-wide biorepository of well-defined tissue and plasma samples along with research utilizing these tissue samples employing state-of-the art proteomics, genomics and development of appropriate mouse models will ...more »

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