Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Reducing Atrial Fibrillation by treating modifiable risk factors

Would better management of modifiable risk factors, including obesity, sleep apnea, hypertension, hyperglycemia, and metabolic syndrome, reduce atrial fibrillation recurrence? Furthermore, what are the best methods to reduce the onset, hospitalization, and death due to atrial fibrillation, especially that associated with aging

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Balancing Risks and Benefits: How Do Clinical Guidelines in Cardiovascular Medicine Promote the Health of an Individual?

Much of the hopes for precision medicine (as outlined Dr. Dr. Collins) are based on deriving large amounts of genomic, proteomic, epigenomic and metabolomic data on large cohorts of patients. It will take decades to build these cohorts and even more time to analyze them and derive specific conclusions on how these will help individualize treatments. However, there is a pressing need for how to individualize contemporary ...more »

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Registry of new-onset, post-operative atrial fibrillation

There is a need for an observational registry of new-onset post-operative atrial fibrillation (AF) patients to better understand the mechanisms of post-operative AF and allow clinicians to define patient-specific AF phenotypes and treatments. The registry’s information and infrastructure could be used to develop and conduct clinical trials that provide strong evidence for guidelines in treating this common problem.

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Preventing Stroke from Atrial Fibrillation

How can health systems develop and implement validated measurement and feedback tools to identify patients with atrial fibrillation, categorize their risk factors for stroke, capture reasons for non-treatment, and develop interventions customized to those reasons to substantially improve the proportion of patients receiving effective oral anticoagulant stroke prevention treatment?

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Guideline effectiveness in treating COPD patients with comorbidities vs. those without

What is the effectiveness of guideline recommendations for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) care in patients with multimorbidity, including angina, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and osteoporosis, vs. patients without these conditions?

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Need to assess a new method of warfarin management vs. new oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation

The two obstacles to warfarin therapy (keeping the INR in range and the associated hassles of frequent lab visits) can be eliminated by INR self testing and online "virtual clinic" monitoring and management (as demonstrated in six small studies. Achieving an INR percent time in range of approximately 75% to 80% is associated with a 50% or lower rate of thromboembolism and major bleeding. The studies of new oral anticoagulants ...more »

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