Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

To Improve Clinical Practice Recommendations for Asthma

What are the strategies to improve the use of evidence-based clinical practice recommendations and thereby increase the quality of care and improve outcomes for people with asthma? • Lack of provider awareness, knowledge, agreement, and/or self-efficacy in using the guidelines • Inconsistent use of guidelines-based asthma care in clinical practice. • Scarce/limited resources and limited access to target audiences. • ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

• Asthma is a chronic lung disease that affects 26 million people in the U.S., including more than 7 million children, at an estimated cost to the nation of $56 billion. Asthma accounts for 14.2 million missed work days, 10.5 million missed school days, 10.6 million physician office visits, and 1.8 million emergency department visits, and 439,000 hospitalizations each year.

• Despite widespread availability of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma, only about half of individuals with asthma in the U.S. receive guidelines-based care.

• Identifying strategies to improve use of evidence-based clinical practice recommendations would 1) increase the number of people with asthma who receive evidence-based clinical care, 2) increase the number of health care providers who use (implement) evidence-based clinical practice recommendations, 3) increase the quality of care of people with asthma, and 4) improve outcomes and quality of life for people with asthma.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

• Investigators could evaluate guidelines-based implementation strategies in implementation settings such as community and regional health systems, private medical practices, federally qualified health centers and other safety-net clinics, and hospitals throughout the U.S.

• Documented successful and sustainable implementation strategies could be shared more broadly and applied to future efforts to improve asthma care and control as well as reduce asthma disparities.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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1 net vote
6 up votes
5 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

ROLE OF HEALTH DISPARITIES IN SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN HEALTH—ENVIRONMENT

Self-report data indicate that insufficient sleep is more common in minority populations. This seems to be related to socioeconomic status. There is a need to move this beyond self-report and obtain objective measures in the relevant populations. Moreover, the basis of this difference needs to be established. What aspect of the environment leads to these differences, e.g., noise, stress related to sense of vulnerability, ...more »

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Self-report indicates that sleep duration is lower in minority populations. This seems to be related to socioeconomic groups. To address this issue requires understanding the basis of this and developing appropriate interventions.

 

The impact of this is as follows:

 

a. Implementing new technology based on mobile approaches to assess sleep duration in subjects in different socioeconomic groups.

b. Developing a comprehensive approach to understanding and evaluating environmental influences in sleep and circadian rhythm.

c. Designing and testing intervention to increase sleep duration in disadvantaged populations.

d. Improving the sleep health of minority populations.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

There is rapidly developing new mobile technology to assess sleep duration and other phenotypes in individuals living in their normal lives. There are a number of studies currently being conducted that could be leveraged to address this question. There are also developing approaches to assess environmental influences on sleep and circadian rhythm such as noise, light exposure, etc. Thus, this question could be addressed in the near future.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Sleep Research Society

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122 net votes
173 up votes
51 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Embedding Clinical Trials in Learning Health Systems

What are the best methods for using genotype information and other EMR data to randomize heart, lung, blood, sleep patients to different treatment strategies? One big challenge is how to consent patients for this sort of trial. Must patients be consented separately for every such trial or could there be blanket consent for participating in the learning health care model? This would also require a paradigm shift in how ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

If successful this approach should enable the conduct of cheap pragmatic trials that are fueled by data from clinical care. The integration into clinical care helps assure efficiency and generalizability of results.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

The advent of electronic medical records and the explosion of big data technology has made it possible to gain access to and analyze data in a manner that would have been unthinkable 10 years ago. This is already going on in other fields.

Health care systems are increasingly using "big data" approaches to track outcomes in the patients treated with different strategies and drugs, and apply the knowledge gained from outcomes in previous patients to inform decision making in subsequent patients ("learning"). This approach could be used to personalize treatment. A recent example from cancer is to genotype lung tumors, and tailor the treatment of a new patients to drugs producing good results in patients with similar tumor genotypes. When two or more treatments produce similar results, one could randomize. Cardiovascular disease presents a challenge in using genotyping information to personalize treatment, because the manifestations are the results of complex genetic and environmental risk factors.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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4 net votes
15 up votes
11 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Health Behavior Change in Vulnerable Individuals

What knowledge about health behavior change can be leveraged to design innovative and effective strategies for behavior change among the most vulnerable individuals?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Significant health disparities exist in part because primary and secondary prevention strategies are not optimal for particularly vulnerable populations, who often grapple with multiple co-morbidities and low resources. Improving health promotion efforts by targeting health behaviors could help to close the disparity gap.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Many health damaging behaviors, such as smoking, are much more prevalent in certain groups than in the population at large. Multi-level efforts to promote health behavior change have not been optimally effective in these vulnerable groups. We need to build on what we know, understand the gaps, and develop new, culturally sensitive behavior change intervention strategies that will be effective for all groups.

Multi-level strategies to change health-damaging behaviors are effective for some behaviors, but tend to be least effective for the most vulnerable populations. For example, the percentage of people who smoke has decreased dramatically in the last 60 years, but significantly less so for racial and ethnic minorities, those with mental health issues, low income groups, and other vulnerable individuals. These differences contribute to health disparities among these groups, and are in part due to the need for multiple risk reduction and for strategies that are culturally informed.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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58 net votes
80 up votes
22 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

ORAL HEALTH AND HEART TREATMENT

Compelling Question:

It is very well established now that oral health, particularly gingavitis, play a significant role in cardiac health.

Why this reality is not considered as integral part of Cardiac care?

Submitted by (@abasit88)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

It is expected that incorporating Oral Bacterial ailments such as Gingivitis for cardiac care will more than pay for itself. It will significantly improve the cardiac event prognoses and CUT THE COST OF CARDIAC CARE.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

It is quite feasible and practically possible to incorporate Gingivitis or other serious bacterial oral health problems as integral part of the work of a Cardiologist.

CHALLENGES: Researching the contribution of Oral bacterial issues such as Gingivitis as compared to smoking, obesity and cholesterol levels.

My hypothesis is that Chronoc Oral Bactrial diseases are significant contributors to cardiac problems.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Abdul Basit, Ph. D.

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7 net votes
14 up votes
7 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Develop common-sense standards for obesity research

Obesity research is riddled with methodological problems that are rarely challenged, leading to the perpetuation of misinformation and interventions that do harm. Given the two-thirds of the population who are classified as higher weight and thus subject to these interventions, it is past time to clean up the basic scientific flaws in this research area. For a quick summary of a couple of these issues, see Poodle Science: ...more »

Submitted by (@dbdb00)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

This subject really is both CG and CC. The CQ aspect is to see past the weight bias and stigma we are all subject to in order to see diversity of weight as normal, even as people across the weight spectrum suffer health insults from sources that are rarely investigated within the medical model (cf social determinants of health). The CC aspect is the enormous economic and cultural pressures to maintain the valuing of some bodies over others in order to sell products and create a group of people who have fewer ways to defend themselves from oppression.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Several key areas could make a big difference and they are quite feasible.

1. Require researchers to have studied weight bias and stigma so they are more aware of their own potential proclivities to frame research questions or results according to the status quo.

2. Require any study that claims a weight loss finding to have, report, and publish followup data on all participants at least 2-5 years post-intervention.

3. Require any study claiming a health issue related to weight to compare not higher and lower weight people, but rather higher weight people who have pursued weight loss and higher weight people who have not, since there is no way for higher weight people to be always-been-thinner.

4. Require weight/health research to control for obvious confounders such as weight cycling, SES, exposure to weight stigma, exposure to weight discrimination, exposure to racism, exposure to stress, lack of access to unbiased medical care, etc.

5. Require that journals allowing statements in the abstract or discussion or conclusions that generalize beyond the data be accountable, and that journals provide an accurate translation of the findings for journalists complete with statements about limitations of findings and possible alternative interpretations.

6. Fund projects which are about listening, especially to people who are rarely asked about their lived experience, in order to generate better research that actually improves quality of life for higher-weight people.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : Deb Burgard, PhD

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24 net votes
44 up votes
20 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Studying Health in Addition to Disease

Why do some people stop smoking after a stroke or myocardial infarction, whereas others do not? What motivates people who adopt a healthier diet and exercise program during their lifetime or after a significant health event? How can we promote healthier lifestyle choices at all stages of life? How do we ensure equitable health promoting activities for minorities, vulnerable populations, and lower socio-economic status ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Answering this critical question would enable us to have a more complete picture both of disease and of health.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

It is feasible to address this critical question because we need to expand our understanding of how people remain healthy or regain health, especially given the unhappy statistics concerning obesity, physical activity, blood pressure, diabetes, etc.

Few would disagree with the importance of studying the epidemiology, mechanisms, and progression of disease: research is focused on preventing or curing diseases. In addition to this disease-focused model, there are untapped opportunities to examine health and wellness. Borrowing from the field of Positive Psychology, which is the study of the aspects or characteristics of mental health (e.g., the strengths, values, behavior that contribute to well-being), we can expand this idea to study the aspects of those who remain healthy, who have retained health after disease, or who have successfully made healthy lifestyle changes. In terms of obesity, an example of this idea is Rena Wing’s National Weight Control Registry, which studies individuals who have successfully maintained long-term weight loss.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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135 net votes
176 up votes
41 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Use of health communication principles in management of obesity

What approaches can utilize current knowledge on health literacy/health communications as a research development tool and/or strategy to enhance obesity prevention and treatment efforts?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Allow the use of non-activity and non-dietary based approaches for managing overweight and obesity

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

Health communication and health literacy are of interest in the US Healthy People 2020 goals. The methodology and principles of health communications and the relationship between health literacy and health outcomes are emerging especially for obesity. There is a sufficient pool of scientists trained to conduct this type of work.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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22 net votes
49 up votes
27 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Community Collaborative Research Targeting Populations with CVD

In what ways can researchers better collaborate with community representatives from populations with high prevalence / morbidity / mortality of cardiovascular disease (CVD) to enhance and sustain interventions and achieve improved health outcomes? How can a combination of health behaviors and risk factors be used to conduct community-engaged research to prevent and treat CVD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Studies designed to engage target populations at high risk for diseases such as CVD, COPD and stroke would help prevent and effectively treat such diseases. Comprehensive interventions addressing health behaviors and risk factors especially in co-morbid conditions will promote the administration of suitable therapies and adherence to medication regimens. Community consultation would generate more effective interventions and accelerate the translation of research results into practice.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

The NHLBI formed COPD working group could be enhanced to engage additional stakeholders like community representatives and community-engaged researchers. Research could be conducted to implement the AHA 2020 impact goals to reduce CVD morbidity and mortality. Cultural adaptations of proven modalities are needed to reach populations most at risk to reduce health disparities. These populations include African Americans, Hispanics (including their subpopulations), and American Indians.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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15 net votes
25 up votes
10 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Leveraging Networks of Federally Qualified Healthcare Centers

How best do we leverage the existing Federally Qualified Healthcare Center’s (FQHC) infrastructure to study T4 Implementation Research for heart, lung, blood, sleep diseases and conditions among high risk and vulnerable populations?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

• Develop strategies to reduced Health Inequities

• Potentially be scaled up across an entire health system with huge population impact

• Studies would be done in the environment and context where the findings with be implemented leading to better uptake and sustainability.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

• Formative FQHC groups are already being organized but do not have strong leadership and support

• FQHCs have ready access to the high risk and vulnerable populations that would benefit most from the research

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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-14 net votes
7 up votes
21 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Using Social Media to Promote Healthy Behaviors

Since most people know that there are behaviors that they need to do to be healthy, can we leverage peer or family pressure or use social media to create a “grass roots” groundswell of health-promoting behaviors?

How might social media platforms such as Facebook and Meetup.com be leveraged for designing low-cost research studies and interventions that promote sustainable healthy lifestyle and behaviors?

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? : Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC :

Given the massive use of mobile devices and social media in our society, engaging this critical challenge would have a significant impact on our understanding how this technology can be used in disease prevention and health promotion.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC :

It is feasible, timely, and cost-effective to study and incorporate into our interventions the use of social media because these applications are already so widely used.

Even if people haven’t memorized the American Heart Association’s seven factors related to heart health (get active, control cholesterol, eat better, manage blood pressure, lose weight, reduce blood sugar, stop smoking), most know that these are the behaviors that they need to do to be healthy. Despite this knowledge, heart disease is still the leading cause of death in the United States; about 1 in 3 U.S. adults has high blood pressure; diabetes affects nearly 26 million in the U.S.; and about 19% of U.S. adults are smokers. According to the CDC, in 2011 over 50% of those 18 years of age or older did not meet the recommended goal for aerobic exercise (150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity activity such as walking). Obesity is an epidemic: about one-third of American adults are obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2). People know what to do, but why don’t they do it? Our built environments and culture do not intrinsically promote a healthy lifestyle. In the absence of a culture that promotes walking or biking over driving cars and that promotes fast and fattening food over more healthy food choices, can we use peer networks to promote healthy behaviors? For example, Meetup.com is a tool that people use to meet for activities that include hiking, tennis, and physical fitness boot camps.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea : NHLBI Staff

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17 net votes
52 up votes
35 down votes
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