(@greg.martin)

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Diaphragmatic dysfunction in critical illness

Diaphragmatic dysfunction occurs more frequently than clinically recognized in the setting of acute critical illness or injury. This contributes to both incipient and prolonged respiratory failure, as well as the growth of long-term acute care/rehab hospitalizations. We need a better understanding of the mechanisms of dysfunction as well as strategies to mitigate loss of diaphragmatic muscle mass, ultimately leading ...more »

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(@wchilian)

Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Intersecting Developmental Biology with Vascular Physiology and Biology

Although many think of the vasculature as a lump sum of vessels that all react in a similar fashion to a certain stimulus, e.g., alpha-adrenergic activation, this is not the situation. For example, coronary resistance vessels show little to no direct response to alpha-adrenergic activation while resistance vessels in most organs show marked constriction. Another example is the response of different vessels to angioplasty ...more »

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(@nhlbiforumadministrator)

Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Preserving and promoting expertise in integrative physiology

From my perspective, one of the key “critical challenges” facing the NHLBI in particular, and medical science in general, is to avoid being blinded by the promises of the reductionists in the “personalized, precision medicine” of the future. In order to understand the advances being made at the molecular level, we need to preserve and promote expertise in truly integrative physiology, what I like to call “PHYSIOMICS”. ...more »

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6 net votes
16 up votes
10 down votes
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