Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

DESIGN AND EVALUATE INTERVENTION STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE SLEEP HEALTH AND CIRCADIAN DISRUPTION

Data indicate the association between short sleep and circadian disruption on a number of adverse outcomes such as cardiovascular disease, metabolic disorders, hypertension, etc. There is a need to move beyond association to interventions that can be shown to improve sleep duration and circadian disruption.

Voting

205 net votes
250 up votes
45 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

UNDERSTANDING SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN DISORDERS AT A BASIC MECHANISTIC LEVEL

We need to understand sleep and circadian disorders at a more mechanistic level. This applies to both the pathogenesis of these disorders and to their impact on health. New neurobiological and molecular tools facilitate this research. The focus needs to be not only in brain but also the impact of these disorders on future of peripheral organs. The elucidation of the fundamental functions of sleep and the impact of ...more »

Voting

179 net votes
232 up votes
53 down votes
Active

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

DEVELOPMENT OF BIOMARKERS FOR SLEEP INSUFFICIENCY, CIRCADIAN DISRUPTION AND SLEEP DISORDERS

There is an urgent need to develop quantifiable biomarkers for acute sleep loss, chronic sleep insufficiency, circadian disruption and sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea. These problems are highly prevalent but currently we do not have biomarkers to use for case identification, prognosis, or assessing response to therapy. There are currently small studies that indicate the feasibility. A recent workshop ...more »

Voting

179 net votes
240 up votes
61 down votes
Active

Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

ELUCIDATING BASIC MECHANISMS OF SLEEP DEFICIENCY AND CIRCADIAN DISRUPTION ON HEALTH THROUGH THE LIFESPAN

There are developing data from clinical studies that sleep deficiency and circadian disruption have multiple adverse consequences for health. The clinical data provide the base for mechanistic studies. Studies in animal models indicate that both circadian disruption and insufficient sleep later gene expression in peripheral tissues. Moreover, the effect of sleep loss in molecular changes in brain changes with age. ...more »

Voting

174 net votes
230 up votes
56 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

DEVELOPMENT OF A PERSONALIZED APPROACH TO SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN DISORDERS

There is developing evidence of major individual differences in pathways to different common sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea. Moreover, there is evidence of different clinical presentations of disease and different outcomes. For example, some subjects with obstructive sleep apnea who get excessive sleepiness while others do not. The latter are still at risk for other consequences of the disorder such ...more »

Voting

167 net votes
220 up votes
53 down votes
Active

Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

ESTABLISH NORMATIVE AGE- AND GENDER-SPECIFIC DATA FOR SLEEP DISRUPTION, SLEEP QUALITY AND CIRCADIAN TIMING

There is growing evidence that sleep durations are progressively declining in the United States. Moreover, sleep durations are different at different ages and in different ethnic groups. Currently definitions of normal are based on consensus since there is a lack of key data. Defining normal as with FEV1 is a critical step.

Voting

157 net votes
214 up votes
57 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

SLEEP DISORDERS AS A MODIFIABLE RISK FACTOR FOR CHRONIC DISEASE

There is developing evidence that sleep disorders, in particular obstructive sleep apnea and inadequate sleep, can influence the course of other chronic diseases. Observational studies show that CPAP treatment of patients with pre-diabetes who have OSA reduces the incidence of future diabetes. Moreover, animal and human data indicate that insufficient sleep and sleep apnea can affect the rate of progression of neurodegenerative ...more »

Voting

156 net votes
211 up votes
55 down votes
Active

Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

INVESTIGATE DIFFERENTIAL VULNERABILITY TO SLEEP DEFICIENCY AND CIRCADIAN DISRUPTION

Studies in different subjects have shown that there are major individual differences in response to sleep loss and circadian disruption. Twin studies have shown that this is heritable. There needs to be an intensive effort to assess basis of these individual differences. This could include in-depth phenotyping studies, e.g., neuroimaging, genetic studies, “-omic” studies, epigenetic changes, etc.

Voting

155 net votes
213 up votes
58 down votes
Active

Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

NOVEL APPROACHES TO TRAINING IN SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN RESEARCH

Sleep and circadian disorders are relatively new areas of medicine. Most universities currently lack a critical mass of investigators to develop institutional T32 grants. Thus, there are, unfortunately, few such programs nationally. The Sleep Research Society has recognized this and is taking active steps to facilitate development of other T32 institutional training grants. This will not, however, help the majority ...more »

Voting

142 net votes
209 up votes
67 down votes
Active

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

NEW INFRASTRUCTURE FOR CLINICAL RESEARCH IN SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN DISORDERS

Much of the current clinical research on sleep and circadian research depends on cohorts designed for other purposes. While this has been helpful, such studies have limitations. These limitations are related to availability of in-depth phenotyping data and questions as to whether individuals identified in population studies are equivalent to those who present clinically with specific disorders. These concerns could ...more »

Voting

126 net votes
186 up votes
60 down votes
Active

Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Submitted by (@hvd000)

Understanding Individual Differences in Responses to Sleep Loss

Individuals differ substantially in their physiological, health, behavioral and cognitive responses to sleep loss. Although these differences represent a trait, individuals who are vulnerable in one domain may be resilient in another - few systematic relationships between physiological, long-term health, cognitive and subjective responses to sleep loss have been found. Moreover, within a given domain, vulnerability to ...more »

Voting

124 net votes
171 up votes
47 down votes
Active