Goal 1: Promote Human Health

ESTABLISH NORMATIVE AGE- AND GENDER-SPECIFIC DATA FOR SLEEP DISRUPTION, SLEEP QUALITY AND CIRCADIAN TIMING

There is growing evidence that sleep durations are progressively declining in the United States. Moreover, sleep durations are different at different ages and in different ethnic groups. Currently definitions of normal are based on consensus since there is a lack of key data. Defining normal as with FEV1 is a critical step.

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

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157 net votes
214 up votes
57 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

SLEEP DISORDERS AS A MODIFIABLE RISK FACTOR FOR CHRONIC DISEASE

There is developing evidence that sleep disorders, in particular obstructive sleep apnea and inadequate sleep, can influence the course of other chronic diseases. Observational studies show that CPAP treatment of patients with pre-diabetes who have OSA reduces the incidence of future diabetes. Moreover, animal and human data indicate that insufficient sleep and sleep apnea can affect the rate of progression of neurodegenerative ...more »

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

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156 net votes
211 up votes
55 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

INVESTIGATE DIFFERENTIAL VULNERABILITY TO SLEEP DEFICIENCY AND CIRCADIAN DISRUPTION

Studies in different subjects have shown that there are major individual differences in response to sleep loss and circadian disruption. Twin studies have shown that this is heritable. There needs to be an intensive effort to assess basis of these individual differences. This could include in-depth phenotyping studies, e.g., neuroimaging, genetic studies, “-omic” studies, epigenetic changes, etc.

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

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155 net votes
213 up votes
58 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

NOVEL APPROACHES TO TRAINING IN SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN RESEARCH

Sleep and circadian disorders are relatively new areas of medicine. Most universities currently lack a critical mass of investigators to develop institutional T32 grants. Thus, there are, unfortunately, few such programs nationally. The Sleep Research Society has recognized this and is taking active steps to facilitate development of other T32 institutional training grants. This will not, however, help the majority ...more »

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

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142 net votes
209 up votes
67 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Studying Health in Addition to Disease

Why do some people stop smoking after a stroke or myocardial infarction, whereas others do not? What motivates people who adopt a healthier diet and exercise program during their lifetime or after a significant health event? How can we promote healthier lifestyle choices at all stages of life? How do we ensure equitable health promoting activities for minorities, vulnerable populations, and lower socio-economic status ...more »

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

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135 net votes
176 up votes
41 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Apheresis Medicine in the Management of Sickle Cell Disease

Despite advances in care, patients with sickle cell disease have significant morbidity and mortality. One challenge is the optimal use of simple vs exchange transfusion vs no transfusion when managing these patients. Simple transfusions lead to iron overload while exchange transfusions may expose patients to increase numbers of red blood cell units. The mechanism of benefit from transfusion (oxygen delivery vs marrow ...more »

Submitted by (@bsachais)

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130 net votes
152 up votes
22 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Funding for Hemostasis & Thrombosis Research

Thrombotic disorders, a result of the inappropriate activation of the hemostatic system, remain major causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Cancer, cardiovascular disease, trauma, and many of the other causes of death in the U.S. frequently culminate in a fatal thrombotic event. Notably, thromboembolic disease affects 500,000 people annually and leads to 100,000 deaths in the United States alone. Current ...more »

Submitted by (@abrams)

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128 net votes
136 up votes
8 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

NEW INFRASTRUCTURE FOR CLINICAL RESEARCH IN SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN DISORDERS

Much of the current clinical research on sleep and circadian research depends on cohorts designed for other purposes. While this has been helpful, such studies have limitations. These limitations are related to availability of in-depth phenotyping data and questions as to whether individuals identified in population studies are equivalent to those who present clinically with specific disorders. These concerns could ...more »

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

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126 net votes
186 up votes
60 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Understanding Individual Differences in Responses to Sleep Loss

Individuals differ substantially in their physiological, health, behavioral and cognitive responses to sleep loss. Although these differences represent a trait, individuals who are vulnerable in one domain may be resilient in another - few systematic relationships between physiological, long-term health, cognitive and subjective responses to sleep loss have been found. Moreover, within a given domain, vulnerability to ...more »

Submitted by (@hvd000)

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124 net votes
171 up votes
47 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Can we leverage exisiting registries to perform prospective trials and advance reduce the cost of doing research?

Current costs for multicenter randomized or non randomized trials are astronomical, and a major obstacle to rapid implementation of potential lifesaving discoveries. In the field of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) their is a federal mandate to have a treatment outcome registry. Funds should be made available to leverage that registry to perform prospective trials either randomized or not since HCT programs need ...more »

Submitted by (@giralts)

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123 net votes
154 up votes
31 down votes
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