Goal 1: Promote Human Health

To expand knowledge of the molecular and physiological mechanisms governing the normal function of heart, lung, blood, and sleep systems as essential elements for sustaining human health.

Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

DESIGN AND EVALUATE INTERVENTION STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE SLEEP HEALTH AND CIRCADIAN DISRUPTION

Data indicate the association between short sleep and circadian disruption on a number of adverse outcomes such as cardiovascular disease, metabolic disorders, hypertension, etc. There is a need to move beyond association to interventions that can be shown to improve sleep duration and circadian disruption.

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Submitted by (@mschubert2)

Establishment of a permanent exercise study section

Funding opportunities explicitly for studies of exercise have not been a major NIH priority. The NHLBI has been an exception to this, but the non-existence of a true exercise study section still makes funding a challenge for individuals in the field of Exercise Science. Exercise, along with sleep and diet, is one of the pillars of health and has been shown to be highly beneficial for a number of medical conditions. However, ...more »

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202 net votes
290 up votes
88 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Submitted by (@mllindsey)

Transformative Impact of Proteomics

The proteomics field has dramatically progressed over the past 20 years, with advancements and improvements in experimental designs and sample preparation protocols, as well as mass spectrometry equipment, approaches, and analysis. This has resulted in substantial forward progress towards a proteomic pipeline to establish cause and effect mechanisms of cardiovascular disease. There is a need for CV proteomics that resolve ...more »

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196 net votes
234 up votes
38 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

ELUCIDATING BASIC MECHANISMS OF SLEEP DEFICIENCY AND CIRCADIAN DISRUPTION ON HEALTH THROUGH THE LIFESPAN

There are developing data from clinical studies that sleep deficiency and circadian disruption have multiple adverse consequences for health. The clinical data provide the base for mechanistic studies. Studies in animal models indicate that both circadian disruption and insufficient sleep later gene expression in peripheral tissues. Moreover, the effect of sleep loss in molecular changes in brain changes with age. ...more »

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174 net votes
230 up votes
56 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

ESTABLISH NORMATIVE AGE- AND GENDER-SPECIFIC DATA FOR SLEEP DISRUPTION, SLEEP QUALITY AND CIRCADIAN TIMING

There is growing evidence that sleep durations are progressively declining in the United States. Moreover, sleep durations are different at different ages and in different ethnic groups. Currently definitions of normal are based on consensus since there is a lack of key data. Defining normal as with FEV1 is a critical step.

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157 net votes
214 up votes
57 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

INVESTIGATE DIFFERENTIAL VULNERABILITY TO SLEEP DEFICIENCY AND CIRCADIAN DISRUPTION

Studies in different subjects have shown that there are major individual differences in response to sleep loss and circadian disruption. Twin studies have shown that this is heritable. There needs to be an intensive effort to assess basis of these individual differences. This could include in-depth phenotyping studies, e.g., neuroimaging, genetic studies, “-omic” studies, epigenetic changes, etc.

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155 net votes
213 up votes
58 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Submitted by (@nhlbiforumadministrator1)

Studying Health in Addition to Disease

Why do some people stop smoking after a stroke or myocardial infarction, whereas others do not? What motivates people who adopt a healthier diet and exercise program during their lifetime or after a significant health event? How can we promote healthier lifestyle choices at all stages of life? How do we ensure equitable health promoting activities for minorities, vulnerable populations, and lower socio-economic status ...more »

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135 net votes
176 up votes
41 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Submitted by (@hvd000)

Understanding Individual Differences in Responses to Sleep Loss

Individuals differ substantially in their physiological, health, behavioral and cognitive responses to sleep loss. Although these differences represent a trait, individuals who are vulnerable in one domain may be resilient in another - few systematic relationships between physiological, long-term health, cognitive and subjective responses to sleep loss have been found. Moreover, within a given domain, vulnerability to ...more »

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124 net votes
171 up votes
47 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

ROLE OF HEALTH DISPARITIES IN SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN HEALTH—ENVIRONMENT

Self-report data indicate that insufficient sleep is more common in minority populations. This seems to be related to socioeconomic status. There is a need to move this beyond self-report and obtain objective measures in the relevant populations. Moreover, the basis of this difference needs to be established. What aspect of the environment leads to these differences, e.g., noise, stress related to sense of vulnerability, ...more »

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122 net votes
173 up votes
51 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

Identify genetic variants of sleep/circadian disorders

Most aspects of variation in sleep and circadian rhythm are heritable. Moreover, all common sleep disorders aggregate in families. The response to sleep loss is also a highly heritable trait. Identifying gene variants for these disorders will elaborate new molecular pathways that could be targets for future interventions.

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84 net votes
117 up votes
33 down votes
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