Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

UNDERSTANDING SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN DISORDERS AT A BASIC MECHANISTIC LEVEL

We need to understand sleep and circadian disorders at a more mechanistic level. This applies to both the pathogenesis of these disorders and to their impact on health. New neurobiological and molecular tools facilitate this research. The focus needs to be not only in brain but also the impact of these disorders on future of peripheral organs. The elucidation of the fundamental functions of sleep and the impact of ...more »

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

DEVELOPMENT OF BIOMARKERS FOR SLEEP INSUFFICIENCY, CIRCADIAN DISRUPTION AND SLEEP DISORDERS

There is an urgent need to develop quantifiable biomarkers for acute sleep loss, chronic sleep insufficiency, circadian disruption and sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea. These problems are highly prevalent but currently we do not have biomarkers to use for case identification, prognosis, or assessing response to therapy. There are currently small studies that indicate the feasibility. A recent workshop ...more »

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

DEVELOPMENT OF A PERSONALIZED APPROACH TO SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN DISORDERS

There is developing evidence of major individual differences in pathways to different common sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea. Moreover, there is evidence of different clinical presentations of disease and different outcomes. For example, some subjects with obstructive sleep apnea who get excessive sleepiness while others do not. The latter are still at risk for other consequences of the disorder such ...more »

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

SLEEP DISORDERS AS A MODIFIABLE RISK FACTOR FOR CHRONIC DISEASE

There is developing evidence that sleep disorders, in particular obstructive sleep apnea and inadequate sleep, can influence the course of other chronic diseases. Observational studies show that CPAP treatment of patients with pre-diabetes who have OSA reduces the incidence of future diabetes. Moreover, animal and human data indicate that insufficient sleep and sleep apnea can affect the rate of progression of neurodegenerative ...more »

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@jnoel0)

HEALTH CARE DISPARITIES IN DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF COMMON SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN DISORDERS

There is evidence of a higher prevalence of sleep and circadian disorders in different ethnic groups. This is true for both adult and pediatric subjects. There is also evidence that minority populations in lower socioeconomic groups do not seek evaluation for sleep disorders as frequently as other segments of our population. There is also evidence that they are less adherent to treatments such as nasal CPAP for obstructive ...more »

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@csaper)

What are the biological consequences of sleep loss or disruption and how can they best be avoided?

Arousals in obstructive sleep apena (OSA) are life saving, but the associated disruption of sleep is now thought to cause cognitive impairment, increased risk of high blood pressure and atherosclerosis, as well as glucose intolerance and metabolic syndrome. The mechanisms for these downstream effects, however, are not well understood. Can these specific pathophysiological mechanisms be identified, and can ways for mitigating ...more »

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Submitted by (@chriscage)

treating sleep apnea without a nose or facial mask

I am lucky to still be alive. I developed heart failure at 41. I turn 60 this month. For the last five years, doctors have tried to get me on a CPAP. I have told them that I'd rather die. I have absolutely no interest in sleeping with a darth vader mask or some strange thing strapped to my nose. Furthermore I had sinus surgery 30 years ago that only partiallly cleared my sinus passage. So forcing air up my nose is very ...more »

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@jeremyplambeck)

Can At-home sleep studies change the rural area diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea

At home sleep tests or personal monitors (PM) have been shown to effectively provide an adequate diagnosis of OSA with the proper pre-screening tests and evaluation. These methods can be adopted by hospitals and if used effectively can save money to the patients and healthcare facility. With the Affordable Healthcare Act the focus is on providing quality care for less money, but many hospitals are slow to adapt. Sleep ...more »

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Submitted by (@bmdixon)

What causes the structural abnormalities that cause sleep apnea, and how can they be prevented?

It is estimated that up to 28% of the population suffer from sleep apnea, which impairs functioning and reduces quality of life, while increasing risk of accidents and a variety of cardiovascular, metabolic, and neuropsychiatric diseases. A large portion of sleep apnea cases are caused by abnormal oro-nasal-maxillo-mandibular features that result in crowding of the upper airway, making it vulnerable to collapsing or ...more »

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