Showing 3 ideas for tag "aplastic"

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Allogeneic transplantation as a safe and universally available therapeutic strategy for treating non-malignant blood diseases

Can new advances in allogeneic blood or marrow transplantation (BMT) make the procedure a safe and universally available therapeutic strategy for treating non-malignant blood and immune disorders such as sickle cell anemia, thalassemia, aplastic anemia, and severe combined immune deficiency?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

The ability of allogeneic blood or marrow transplantation (BMT) to cure diverse non-malignant diseases is well-documented. However, widespread use in diseases such as sickle cell anemia that cause substantial morbidity and shorten life but are not immediately life-threatening, has been limited by transplant-related toxicity and mortality especially in the majority of these patients who lack HLA-matched donors. Several new therapeutic approaches now exist that are promising strategies, separately or in combination, for addressing issues of donor availability, graft rejection, organ toxicity and acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease more effectively. Evaluation and refinement of these therapeutic strategies in both preclinical and Phase I-III clinical trials now offers a real possibility that allogeneic BMT could be applied early in the course of these diseases, allowing normal growth, development, quality of life and lifespan. If successful, allogeneic BMT offers a major advantage over gene therapy approaches even if such approaches become possible in the future; i.e., allogeneic BMT can be done with low-dose, non-toxic conditioning while gene therapy requires high-dose myeloablative therapy which not only can be toxic/fatal to these patients who often have end-organ dysfunction but also universally induces infertility, a major concern of patient groups who usually survive beyond child-bearing years.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

There are now single institution and registry (CIBMTR) data showing that related haploidentical allogeneic BMT using post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCy) produces results similar to those seen with HLA-matched sibling donors. Accordingly, every patient in need of allogeneic BMT now can safely undergo the procedure, including those ethnic groups (such as African-Americans and Hispanics) who are unlikely to find a donor in unrelated registries. Combining PTCy with other approaches for preventing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) can even eliminate GVHD and transplant-related mortality. Although recurrence of malignant diseases remains an issue, especially as GVHD is eliminated, relapse is not a concern for non-malignant diseases after successful allogeneic engraftment. Moreover, the average cost of allogeneic BMT, about $150K, is a cost-savings over the long-term management of many of these diseases. The NHLBI-funded BMT Clinical Trials Network (CTN) has developed the infrastructure to rapidly and efficiently carry out large multi-institutional BMT trials. Over the last 15 year, thousands of patients have been entered on BMT CTN trials. Of note, African-Americans and Hispanics remarkably represent 30% of the accruals on one such trial, CTN1101, studying unrelated umbilical cord and related haploidentical allogeneic BMT. However, funding for the infrastructure for continuing this work remains problematic, since BMT trials generally lack corporate funding.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Rick Jones

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Transplantation across HLA barriers in aplastic anemia

Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is curative in aplastic anemia with much less intrinsic toxicity than transplantation in hematologic malignancies. The recent BMT-CTN trial demonstrated 97% survival at one year with little subsequent decline. However patients without matched related or unrelated donors have graft-rejection rates of up to 50%. Preliminary data from the Netherlands suggests that anti-thymocyte globulin... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

The use of umbilical cord blood or haploidentical donors has proven effective in patients with hematologic malignancies, but in non-malignant disorders outcomes are limited by graft rejection. Overcoming rejection in this context would be applicable to other non-malignant disorders such as thalassemia, sickle cell anemia, and other congenital disorders of hematopoiesis.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

It will require a large coordinated network like BMT-CTN to obtain sufficient patients studied in a uniform fashion to provide consistent reproducible data. .

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Joseph Antin

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Sickle Cell anemia and Aplastic anemia survivors: Late effects and quality of life issues in Stem Cell Transplant Survivors

Most of the patients suffering from non-malignant hematologic conditions are cured of the original disease with Hematopoitec Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT) but still their survival is less compared to age matched general population, and additionally they suffer from unique complications of HSCT culminating into a variety of late physical, psychologic, financial, and social complications (“late effects”). Considerable improvements... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

One million HSCT mile stone was recently reached and the utilization of HSCTs continues to increase. For many non-malignant hematologic conditions particularly sickle cell anemia and bone marrow failure syndromes, HSCT is the only potentially curative option. Most HSCT survivors are living beyond a year, but can suffer from devastating complications of HSCT which include graft-versus-host-disease, second cancers, diabetes, infertility, congestive heart failure, blindness, and bronchiolitis obliterans, besides many others which lead to increased overall HSCT related disease burden. A lot of efforts are currently being put in cancer survivorship by the ACS, NCI, ASCO and other societies, but very little emphasis is being laid on sickle cell or aplastic anemia survivors. This area of HSCT survivorship becomes more important from health disparities perspective too, since majority of the hemoglobinopathy HSCTs performed in the US are in racial minorities. Comparative effectiveness research (CER) in HSCT survivorship is essential to delineate the overall disease burden this population and understand the risks and outcomes of HSCT late effects. To compare the effectiveness of survivorship programs and research, especially for those survivors who are at risk of health disparities is a top priority of the Institute of Medicine CER 2009 initiative.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Majority of the HSCT survivors of benign hematologic conditions are now living beyond 2 years post-HSCT. Blood and Marrow Transplant (BMT) Clinical Trials Network (CTN) was established in 2001 to conduct large Multi-Institutional clinical trials and is funded by the NHLBI. Since the infrastructure is in place to conduct studies related to all aspects of HSCT, this would be an area to explore first from feasibility perspective since thousands of patients have already been successfully enrolled through the BMT-CTN studies. From NHLBI strategic perspective, this would place CTN (and Emmes Corporation) in an excellent unique position of addressing CER for survivorship issues and health disparities within one study, since the population understudy would mainly be consistent of racial minorities – with the overall goal of improving the long term health, preventing late effects, improving quality of life, and reduce the overall health burden (DALYs and societal costs) of thousands of HSCT survivors in the US and globally.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Shahrukh Hashmi

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