Showing 7 ideas for tag "behavior"

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Health Behavior Change in Vulnerable Individuals

What knowledge about health behavior change can be leveraged to design innovative and effective strategies for behavior change among the most vulnerable individuals?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Significant health disparities exist in part because primary and secondary prevention strategies are not optimal for particularly vulnerable populations, who often grapple with multiple co-morbidities and low resources. Improving health promotion efforts by targeting health behaviors could help to close the disparity gap.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Many health damaging behaviors, such as smoking, are much more prevalent in certain groups than in the population at large. Multi-level efforts to promote health behavior change have not been optimally effective in these vulnerable groups. We need to build on what we know, understand the gaps, and develop new, culturally sensitive behavior change intervention strategies that will be effective for all groups.
Multi-level strategies to change health-damaging behaviors are effective for some behaviors, but tend to be least effective for the most vulnerable populations. For example, the percentage of people who smoke has decreased dramatically in the last 60 years, but significantly less so for racial and ethnic minorities, those with mental health issues, low income groups, and other vulnerable individuals. These differences contribute to health disparities among these groups, and are in part due to the need for multiple risk reduction and for strategies that are culturally informed.

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Behavior change labs: an interdisciplinary team approach

Will integration of behavior science in clinical research improve effectiveness of interventions for HLBS diseases associated with behavioral risk factors?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Currently, there is no industry support for T1 (basic to clinical) behavioral research and therefore little incentive for basic and clinical behavioral scientists to work together to develop and test new, innovative strategies for changing HLBS-related behaviors based on basic behavioral science findings on motivation, perception, cognition and social relationships. Bringing together collaborative, interdisciplinary teams of basic behavioral scientists and clinically-oriented behavioral researchers could spur development and testing of innovative new approaches to difficult HLBS-related behavioral problems such as obesity, unhealthy diets, sedentary lifestyles, smoking and non-adherence to preventive and therapeutic HLBS regimens.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

New research in the behavioral sciences is elucidating the basic psychological, cognitive, social and behavioral processes underlying behavior and behavior change. Findings in this area could be developed into new strategies targeting problematic HLBS-related behaviors, but a mechanism for developing and testing novel ideas is needed. Networks designed to bring together basic and clinically-oriented behavioral researchers can enable better understanding of the bases of HLBS-related behaviors and accelerate the translation of findings into new approaches.
Adopting and maintaining healthy habits and lifestyles – such as eating healthy diets, engaging in regular physical activity, stopping smoking, and regularly taking prescribed medications – are crucial to heart, lung, blood and sleep (HLBS) health (Akesson et al, 2014; Mozaffarian, 2014). However, for most people, engaging in and maintaining a healthy lifestyle is challenging. Interventions designed to promote behavior change have had limited success, often influencing individuals over the short-term but failing to alter behaviors over longer periods of time, which is necessary to realizing the full benefits of a healthy lifestyle. Underlying the problematic behaviors associated with HLBS-related behavioral risk factors are fundamental psychological, motivational, cognitive and social processes that represent promising targets for the development of new, more effective behavioral interventions. For example, basic behavioral scientists are investigating the role of poor executive function in unhealthy eating behavior and exploring new ways to address the "self-control" failures that lead to impulsive eating.

However, unlike the biomedical arena where the translational pathway from basic science to clinical application is supported by both NIH and industry, there is no industry support and relatively little NIH funding devoted to T1 behavioral research -- i.e., research translating basic behavioral science findings into clinically significant behavioral interventions. As a result, basic behavioral science researchers have little incentive to collaborate with clinical researchers to develop and test novel behavioral treatments. Bringing together collaborative, interdisciplinary teams of basic behavioral scientists and clinically-oriented behavioral researchers could spur development and testing of innovative new approaches to difficult HLBS-related behavioral problems.

A compelling question is how to bring together these disparate researchers over a long enough time frame to enable them to identify, develop and testing new strategies for tackling resistant behavioral problems. One way to address this question is to fund a network of "behavior change labs," each of which brings together teams of basic behavioral scientists who are investigating the bases of behavior and behavior change with clinical researchers interested in designing, optimizing and testing novel ideas for tackling the difficult behavioral problems represented by obesity, unhealthy diets, sedentary lifestyles, smoking and non-adherence to medications used to prevent or treat HLBS diseases and disorders.

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129 up votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior Research

There is a need to enhance research efficiency for physical activity and sedentary behavior research by facilitating standardization of the definition of sedentary behavior; employing research strategies that support reliable, valid, and efficient ways to measure and analyze sedentary behaviors; supporting better approaches for data harmonization to promote comparability across studies; and facilitating the use of platforms... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

It will enhance the feasibility of conducting activity-related trials and facilitate data harmonization to better inform interpretation of research findings

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

The US population is mostly sedentary and the health effects of inactivity is very costly. Doing nothing in this area will likely lead to more population-level and individual-level adverse health outcomes that would be costly fiscally.
A large amount of epidemiological data indicate potentially serious health risks of sedentary behaviors and physical inactivity. Identifying and testing effective and translatable sedentary behavior interventions would have a measurably beneficial impact on population health. They could also be potentially cost-effective compared to other types of intervention.

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75 up votes
31 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Behavioral and Clinical Researcher Interactions

A critical challenge is the need to bring together basic behavioral scientists interested in understanding human behavior at a fundamental level, including how and why people become motivated and capable of undertaking behavioral changes, with clinical researchers interested in developing and testing new strategies for tackling resistant behavioral problems such as obesity and non-adherence.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Obesity and non-adherence are two of the most important yet challenging behavioral problems contributing to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. One way to address this challenge is to fund a network of “behavior change labs,” each of which bring together teams of basic behavioral scientists who are investigating the bases of behavior and behavior change with clinical researchers interested in designing, optimizing and testing novel ideas for tackling the difficult behavior problems of obesity and non-adherence to cardiac medications.

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32 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Building Effective Interventions for Heart-Healthy Eating

What translational science approaches are best able to test individual, community, and environmental approaches for increasing adherence to heart-healthy dietary recommendations, such as the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet?

What are the most effective types of interventions (e.g., personal coaching, print material, interactive internet content, faith-based community programs, campaigns) and tools... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

This information will inform intervention, education, and outreach efforts and ultimately result in reduced CVD risk.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Similar studies have been done in this time frame.
There is strong evidence, based on controlled feeding studies, that DASH-style eating patterns can lower blood pressure and improve blood lipids, and thus reduce risk for CVD. Yet, very few individuals regularly follow DASH.

Enabling resource needs.is a challenge in addressing this CQ.

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9 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Behavioral Interventions Through Modern Technology

What are the effects of behavioral interventions delivered with modern technology and using modern media techniques on changing the habits of adults between age 40 and 60?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Recruit two hundred thousand adults between the ages of 40 and 60 as a laboratory for behavioral interventions delivered with modern technology and using modern media techniques – use the seven habits or similar – provide resources so that the population is representative, encourage the baseline collection of serum samples. Model this on some of the patient center networks funded by PCORI in 2013. Partner with AHA, PCORI, CDC.

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21 up votes
11 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Basic understanding on the mechanisms of overeating

We have an in depth understanding of the effects nutrients and diet have on the development of chronic disease, yet very little research funding has gone to understanding the basic mechanisms of eating behavior and how to successful change diet. There are currently no study sections at NIH that specialize in nutrition and/or human eating behavior, and therefore proposals in this subject area get farmed out to other study... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

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