Showing 8 ideas for tag "behavioral"

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

How can we improve strategies for weight loss maintenance

There is a need to improve and optimize strategies for weight loss maintenance to make them more effective for more individuals.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Weight regain is the biggest challenge in obesity treatment. For many obese or overweight adults, losing weight over an initial period of time (usually 6 months) is achievable using a comprehensive lifestyle program, which includes a reduced-calorie diet, increased physical activity, and behavior therapy. Yet, participants in even the most successful weight loss programs regain weight after the first 6-12 months, especially if the intervention is discontinued or becomes less intensive.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

recommendations from a recent working group meeting. We are ready to do more cross-collaborative work between physiologists and behavioral interventionists.

This question addresses both discovery science and clinical science goals.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

Voting

67 net votes
97 up votes
30 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Behavior change labs: an interdisciplinary team approach

Will integration of behavior science in clinical research improve effectiveness of interventions for HLBS diseases associated with behavioral risk factors?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Currently, there is no industry support for T1 (basic to clinical) behavioral research and therefore little incentive for basic and clinical behavioral scientists to work together to develop and test new, innovative strategies for changing HLBS-related behaviors based on basic behavioral science findings on motivation, perception, cognition and social relationships. Bringing together collaborative, interdisciplinary teams of basic behavioral scientists and clinically-oriented behavioral researchers could spur development and testing of innovative new approaches to difficult HLBS-related behavioral problems such as obesity, unhealthy diets, sedentary lifestyles, smoking and non-adherence to preventive and therapeutic HLBS regimens.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

New research in the behavioral sciences is elucidating the basic psychological, cognitive, social and behavioral processes underlying behavior and behavior change. Findings in this area could be developed into new strategies targeting problematic HLBS-related behaviors, but a mechanism for developing and testing novel ideas is needed. Networks designed to bring together basic and clinically-oriented behavioral researchers can enable better understanding of the bases of HLBS-related behaviors and accelerate the translation of findings into new approaches.
Adopting and maintaining healthy habits and lifestyles – such as eating healthy diets, engaging in regular physical activity, stopping smoking, and regularly taking prescribed medications – are crucial to heart, lung, blood and sleep (HLBS) health (Akesson et al, 2014; Mozaffarian, 2014). However, for most people, engaging in and maintaining a healthy lifestyle is challenging. Interventions designed to promote behavior change have had limited success, often influencing individuals over the short-term but failing to alter behaviors over longer periods of time, which is necessary to realizing the full benefits of a healthy lifestyle. Underlying the problematic behaviors associated with HLBS-related behavioral risk factors are fundamental psychological, motivational, cognitive and social processes that represent promising targets for the development of new, more effective behavioral interventions. For example, basic behavioral scientists are investigating the role of poor executive function in unhealthy eating behavior and exploring new ways to address the "self-control" failures that lead to impulsive eating.

However, unlike the biomedical arena where the translational pathway from basic science to clinical application is supported by both NIH and industry, there is no industry support and relatively little NIH funding devoted to T1 behavioral research -- i.e., research translating basic behavioral science findings into clinically significant behavioral interventions. As a result, basic behavioral science researchers have little incentive to collaborate with clinical researchers to develop and test novel behavioral treatments. Bringing together collaborative, interdisciplinary teams of basic behavioral scientists and clinically-oriented behavioral researchers could spur development and testing of innovative new approaches to difficult HLBS-related behavioral problems.

A compelling question is how to bring together these disparate researchers over a long enough time frame to enable them to identify, develop and testing new strategies for tackling resistant behavioral problems. One way to address this question is to fund a network of "behavior change labs," each of which brings together teams of basic behavioral scientists who are investigating the bases of behavior and behavior change with clinical researchers interested in designing, optimizing and testing novel ideas for tackling the difficult behavioral problems represented by obesity, unhealthy diets, sedentary lifestyles, smoking and non-adherence to medications used to prevent or treat HLBS diseases and disorders.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

Voting

83 net votes
129 up votes
46 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Can Psychological Science Improve Weight Loss?

Will sensitivity to the psychological aspects of obesity, including lifestyle priorities and motivations, improve the efficacy of long-term effectiveness of weight loss and obesity prevention interventions?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

A primary focus on principles of psychology may result in significantly improved control of the obesity epidemic. Effective interventions could reduce the risk of diabetes, sleep apnea, and hypertension. This research could also affect clinical practice guidelines for weight loss and obesity treatment.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Psychological science has been successful in developing effective treatments for a number of conditions, including sleep disorders, depressive symptoms, anxiety and phobias. Many of the behavioral principles employed in such interventions (e.g., cognitive restructuring, motivational methods) could be translated for the prevention and treatment of obesity within a reasonable time frame. Additional attention should be directed to the needs of population subgroups in which obesity is most prevalent.
In their Viewpoint article on weight loss intervention research, Pagoto and Appelhans (JAMA, 2013, see attachment) question whether a continued focus on dietary factors in research on weight loss and obesity is warranted. Their commentary raises the importance of attention to the individual psychological characteristics that influence adherence to weight loss interventions rather than dietary composition.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

Voting

51 net votes
104 up votes
53 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Psychological & Behavioral Phenotyping to Improve Weight Control

What information is needed to improve our understanding of individual characteristics and processes that explain or predict dietary intake patterns, initiation or sustained engagement in physical activity, and sedentary behavior so that we can improve treatment matching and identify novel targets for more efficacious individual- and population-level approaches for weight management?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Because there is wide variability in response to obesity treatment, strategies that take individual psychological, behavioral, sociocultural, motivational, cognitive and emotional characteristics into account so that treatments can better "match" the individual's needs could greatly improve the efficacy of existing treatments and/or lead to new more effective weight loss strategies.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

By adding measures of key psychological, social, and behavioral processes to ongoing or planned weight control studies, we can learn which characteristics are most predictive of weight loss and maintenance for which participants, leading to better tailoring of weight loss treatments to the individual and potentially improved outcomes.
Despite evidence that use of evidence-based behavioral weight loss strategies can be effective and lead to meaningful improvements in health outcomes, there is wide variability in response to treatment and varying degrees of maintenance of weight loss.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

Voting

29 net votes
50 up votes
21 down votes
Active

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Impact of care coordination programs on depression detection and treatment in COPD patients

Does a care coordination program improve the detection and treatment of co-morbid depression in patients with COPD?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Edna Shattuck, COPD Foundation Patient Advocate

Voting

13 net votes
17 up votes
4 down votes
Active

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Impact of depression screening in COPD patients

What is the impact of screening for depression on outcomes of patients with COPD?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Cara Pasquale, COPD Foundation

Voting

12 net votes
14 up votes
2 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Clinical Trials in Pediatric Sleep Disorders - Effect of adenotonsillectomy

Effect of adenotonsillectomy on neurocognitive and behavioral outcomes in infants and and toddlers with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

The CHAT study showed few significant changes in cognitive outcomes in school-aged children with OSAS. However, these children (aged 5-9 years) may have suffered from OSAS too long to allow for reversibility of central nervous system damage. The peak prevalence of OSAS occurs in much younger children. Theoretically, these children are much more likely to show cognitive improvement after treatment, due to a shorter duration of OSAS (with its resultant hypoxemic damage) and increased plasticity of their nervous system. These young children are often not treated, due to either underdiagnosis or concern about the increased risks of adenotonsillectomy in very young children. Thus, if it is found that early treatment reverses cognitive damage, the clinical management of these children would be profoundly affected.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea ATS Member

Voting

0 net votes
1 up votes
1 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Behavioral Science in Asthma Clinical Research

As the current chair of the Research and Training Division, I would like to convey that the AAAAI membership would like the NHLBI to consider the following in the development of its strategic plan:

 

Will integration of behavior science in clinical research improve effectiveness of interventions for asthma associated with behavioral risk factors? 

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Mitchell Grayson on behalf of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

Voting

-5 net votes
8 up votes
13 down votes
Active