Showing 5 ideas for tag "biomarker"

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Diagnosing Risks to Sleep Health and Therapeutic Responses

What are practical point-of-care diagnostic biomarkers that could be used for assessment of sleep/circadian health, sleep disorders, and the risk of sleep-related heart, lung, and blood diseases?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Existing assessments based on intensive overnight physiological measurements of sleep interpreted by medical specialists are impractical for the goal of diagnosing a spectrum of sleep-related health risks and the need to protect the safety of the public at large. Sleep/circadian-related biomarker panels are needed to enable the development of practical diagnostic tests for point of care implementation, and determining whether the response to therapy has been successful.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Mature high-throughput genomic technologies combined with recent advances in our knowledge of sleep-coupled pathways provide a rich foundation for systematic investigation and the application of computational modeling strategies.
Discovery research advances implicate an array of cellular sleep and circadian mechanisms in pathophysiological pathways leading to cardiometabolic and pulmonary disease. Irregular and disturbed sleep impairs cellular biological rhythm in all tissues and organs leading to oxidative stress, unfolded protein responses, and impaired cell function. These pathophysiological changes are accessible to existing high-throughput quantitative technologies facilitating systematic study and the identification of candidates and panels of candidate correlating with sleep health status.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

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107 up votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Congential heart defects in diabetic pregnancies: a devastating reality

There is an urgent need to understand the mechanisms underlying diabetes-induced congenital heart defects (CHDs) through basic science research and biomarker identification in human maternal circulation. Majority of the current research in CHDs is related to genetic analyses; however, environmental factors contribute to the majority of human CHDs, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. There is 60 million worldwide... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

More than 32,000 infants are born with heart defects each year in the United States, and about 1 in 150 adults are expected to have some form of congenital heart defect. Approximately, 25% of infants born with heart defects (2.4 per 1,000 live births) require invasive treatment in the first year of life, and in 2009 heart defects were the most common cause of infant death. Therefore, understanding the underlying causes of abnormal heart formation is an essential step towards developing effective new therapeutic treatments or preventions for heart defects. Using diabetes-induced CHDs as research models will reveal critical molecular pathways that contributes to heart cell proliferation and apoptosis.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

The same types of heart defects seen in human diabetic pregnancies can be recapitulated in diabetic animal models, making rodents ideal models to investigate how maternal hyperglycemia may induce congenital heart defects. Dietary supplements of natural compounds may be effective against CHDs in diabetic pregnancies. Clinically, new imaging techniques needs be developed for the early diagnosis of CHDs in diabetic pregnancies. Biomarkers in human blood samples needs be detailed analyzed so that we can use small molecules such as microRNA for reliable and early diagnosis.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Peixin Yang

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22 up votes
0 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Detection of rupture prone small aortic aneurysms

Critical challenges in the assessment of aortic aneurysms are: (1) Availability of reliable animal models that simulate the human pathology, (2) Availability of molecular imaging resources – identification of biomarkers, development of targeted imaging probes and pre-clinical imaging methods, and plasma markers that predict whether an aneurysm is prone to rupture or dissection, (3) Bringing together a wide array of multi-disciplinary... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Developing clinically viable methods to detect rupture prone aneurysms can lead to better methods of diagnosis and intervention and avoid preventable fatalities

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Several other disease areas including oncological that had similar gap was filled by NIH (NCI) and the challenges were overcome in less than 10 years. The scientific expertise to fill the gap exists, however they work in silos, which need to be brought together to fulfil this gap and is achievable in less than 10 years
Assessment of aortic aneurysms that are prone to rupture or dissection has been an elusive target. Current clinical practice measures the aortic diameter and fails to relate to the pathophysiology and biomechanical properties of the aneurysm in deciding preventive surgery. Critical gap exists in the diagnosis of aneurysm especially with small aneurysms (3 - 5 cm in diameter) that are rupture prone. Based on autopsy about 10 percent of individuals with small abdominal aneurysms had undergone fatal rupture, while 40 percent with diameters of 7-10 cm had intact aneurysm and died from other causes. International Registry of Aortic Dissection found that 40% of thoracic aneurysms dissected at diameters smaller than 5 cm.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

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18 up votes
11 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Heart transplant surveillance

It is essential to develop clinically viable, non-invasive, less expensive technologies for the surveillance of allograft rejection in heart transplant patients. Critical challenges that exist in the near term or long term surveillance after transplant is the unavailability of molecular and cellular level markers that can be non-invasively imaged and quantified detect rejection and thus improve patient survival. Development... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Development of methods for near term or long term surveillance after transplant can help detect the rejection and thus improve patient survival

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

The fast growth in the imaging technologies and molecular and cellular imaging technologies are gaining foot in cardiovascular sciences and should be feasible within a decade
The current surveillance to detect transplant rejection requires repeated testing with endo myocardial biopsy and catheter angiography. Both technologies are highly invasive and very expensive. Post-transplant surveillance is focused on the cellular rejection in the near term after transplant and cardiac allograft vasculopathy in the long term.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

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14 up votes
13 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Research on in vitro and in vivo Biomarker Predictors of Clinical Response in Lung Disease

How can research on in vitro and in vivo biomarker predictors of clinical response in lung disease be encouraged?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

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