Showing 3 ideas for tag "biorepository"

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Molecular determinants of vascular wall development and aneurysm formation that can be used as markers for early diagnosis

To increase the potential of translating basic research discoveries into the clinic, there is a need to discover molecular biomarkers that confer risk for aneurysms and vascular dissections. The creation of a nation-wide biorepository of well-defined tissue and plasma samples along with research utilizing these tissue samples employing state-of-the art proteomics, genomics and development of appropriate mouse models will... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

The challenge is the coordination of all components of the Project (i.e. development of a national biorepository along with coordination of proteomics and genomics analysis as well as proof of concept in animal models).

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

This process is not feasible via the R01 funding mechanisms. The feasibility of addressing this critical challenge is excellent provided adequate resources are provided.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Dudley Strickland and Selen Catania Muratoglu

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5 net votes
7 up votes
2 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Creating research infrastructure through supporting the development of biorepositories and registries for rare lung diseases

Progress in rare lung diseases, such as interstitial lung diseases, has been hampered by a lack of patient-derived samples in large enough quantities or high-enough quality for systematic study. This is due to the inability of individual centers to recruit enough patients, and because of the varied samples each center obtains. Collecting, preparing, and storing such samples is not fundable by the NHLBI because it is not... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

The impact of addressing this Critical Challenge cannot be underestimated. Researchers throughout the country and the world are hamstrung by not being able to test hypotheses on reliable patient-derived samples. By supporting the creation of a biorepository of well-annotated, clinically-phenotyped biological samples from patients with interstitial lung disease, the scientific community will be able to attack many hypotheses simultaneously rather than individually as is currently the case. Utilizing an 'honest broker'-type system, researchers whose ideas have scientific merit will be able to access this trove of samples and data to confirm (or refute) their hypotheses. This type of resource does not exist but is critically needed.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Currently, few institutions care for a large proportion of interstitial lung disease patients nationwide. These institutions have already shown an ability to work together in other NHLBI-sponsored projects, such as IPFnet and LTRC. Thus, this project is feasible. Challenges that will need to be overcome include determining the appropriate samples to be collected, the centers that will participate in collecting samples and data, and identifying individuals or programs that can serve as an 'honest-broker' for this type of platform. However, engaging research partners among various centers has already been documented, with industry, academia, and patient advocacy groups coming together to support such an initiative.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Eric White

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-1 net votes
11 up votes
12 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Biorepository to facilitate epidemiologic studies of transfusion-transmitted diseases and validation of laboratory tests for don

There is a critical need for a proactive and coordinated effort to develop well-characterized biorepositories that can be used for epidemiologic studies of emerging infectious agents to expedite rapid implementation of donor screening tests for emerging pathogens and variants that pose a threat to the blood supply.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Globalization and climate change have enabled the spread of infectious diseases worldwide. Many new infectious agents that pose a potential threat to blood safety and availability and prevalent predominantly in other countries have emerged in the United States during the past few decades. They include but are not limited to West Nile virus, Dengue, Babesia, Malaria, Leishmania, Chikungunya, T. cruzi and Ebola which pose a safety concern and pandemic agents such as MERS, SARS and Pandemic Influenza that threaten blood availability. Rapid and timely implementation of effective intervention measures such as donor testing could greatly reduce morbidity and mortality resulting from transfusion of blood and blood products potentially contaminated by these agents. A key impediment is the lack of a pedigreed and universal biorepository of specimens that have been well characterized both serologically and genetically and by specific disease states for test developers to evaluate and validate candidate assays. A coordinated multi-center cross-expertise collaborative effort involving investigators in government, academia and industry is needed to successfully address this critical challenge for the blood supply.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

This initiative is feasible as investigators in blood organizations, academia and government are already working independently towards this goal in their defined areas of study. Through this initiative a coordinated, structured framework and mechanism to collect and characterize a universal biorepository of specimens from donors of Whole blood and their linked transfusion recipients, as well as Source Plasma donors could be developed. In addition, follow up specimens could be collected on an ongoing basis to generate a repository of linked, sequentially derived specimens which together with blood donor-recipient pairs could be useful for studies on utility of tests and evaluation of disease outcomes resulting from transmission of infectious agents. The repository could potentially include a variety of specimen types including plasma, serum, whole blood, cells, dried blood spots etc. collected on an ongoing basis over a period of a few years (5-10) for test developers to evaluate and validate assays as needed. This effort would also generate a database and useful datasets that could be informative for risk assessment as part of test implementation. Overall, by addressing this key barrier, a rapid response laboratory network could be established to perform the necessary epidemiologic studies and for test development to expedite timely implementation of donor testing, a major safety measure for reducing infectious disease transmission through the blood supply.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Office of Blood Research and Review, CBER, FDA

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3 net votes
12 up votes
9 down votes
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