Showing 4 ideas for tag "cv"

Goal 1: Promote Human Health

ESTABLISH NORMATIVE AGE- AND GENDER-SPECIFIC DATA FOR SLEEP DISRUPTION, SLEEP QUALITY AND CIRCADIAN TIMING

There is growing evidence that sleep durations are progressively declining in the United States. Moreover, sleep durations are different at different ages and in different ethnic groups. Currently definitions of normal are based on consensus since there is a lack of key data. Defining normal as with FEV1 is a critical step.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

There is a developing evidence from both basic research and clinical research on the role of insufficient sleep in different co-morbidities. These include cardiovascular disease, hypertension and metabolic disorders. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has appreciated the importance of this that adequate sleep is one of the pillars of health. As part of the CDC-supported program on sleep health, a consensus statement has been issued on normal sleep duration. The group doing this on behalf of the American Academic of Sleep Medicine and Sleep Research Society realized that our evidence base is inadequate at this time. Thus, there is a need to focus on this critical challenge. Sleep duration varies across the lifespan and there is some evidence that it is different in different ethnic groups. Thus, there is a need for comprehensive efforts to address this question and to obtain normative data for sleep duration that is age-, gender-specific and with respect to different ethnic groups.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

There are now recent cohorts at NIH assessing sleep duration using not only self-report but also actigraphy. These could be used as an initial approach to address this question. This will require some degree of coordination between NIH Institutes. In the future a cohort that is specific to addressing questions about sleep duration and other sleep problems would be optimal. There are major prevalent public health issues. This would be facilitated by development of new mobile approaches to assessing these behaviors in an objective way.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Sleep Research Society

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57 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Reducing CV events in breast cancer survivors -knowledge gaps

Identifying breast cancer survivors at high risk for CV morbidity and mortality to allow targeting of management strategies to reduce CV events and thereby improve overall cancer-related survival.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Chemotherapy for breast cancer stages I-III is known to be associated with or induce cardiotoxicity. Over 35% of these women develop progressive fatigue and exercise intolerance, and heart failure limiting their daily activities and frequently interfering with their ability to return to work. CV disease are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality for those surviving beyond 5 to 8 years from their breast cancer diagnosis. The excess of CV morbidity and mortality in these patients threatens to offset reductions in cancer-related survival. Identifying breast cancer survivors at high risk for CV morbidity and mortality could allow targeting of cardiovascular disease reducing therapeutic interventions.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

creating a multisite registry of women with Stage 1-3 breast cancer scheduled to receive chemotherapy and a control population women of similar demographic and CV risk profile without neoplasia, would allow to collect data at baseline and during/after cancer treatment related modern therapy, pre/post treatment functional status, including fatigue, behavioral and psychosocial risk factors and quality of life, and serum biomarkers indicative of myocardial injury, fibrosis, and heart failure.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

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5 up votes
6 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Personalized Medicine thru CV bioinformation/tissue repository

There is a need to establish virtual CV biologic tissues and a bioinformational repository for specific CV diseases, including congenital cardiovascular malformations, genetic or other unique cardiomyopathies, such as stress cardiomyopathy and giant cell myocarditis.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Personalized medicine promises patient-tailored management enhancing patient care and decreasing overall treatment costs by focusing on genetics/omics data obtained from patient biospecimens and electronic medical records (EMR) to guide therapy that generate optimal clinical outcomes. The approach relies on diagnostic and prognostic use of novel biomarkers discovered through combinations of tissue banking, bioinformatics, and electronic medical records. The analytical power of bioinformatic platforms combined with patient clinical data from EMRs can reveal potential biomarkers and clinical phenotypes that allow researchers to develop experimental strategies using selected patient biospecimens stored in tissue banks.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

the repository would utilize high quality biospecimens in concert with reliable EMR collected at diagnosis and through various treatment stages to provide crucial resources help identify a new risk factors and to facilitate development of novel therapies. The data obtained would also require cross-disciplinary collaborations to translate experimental results into clinical practice and diagnostic and prognostic use in personalized medicine. The repository focus would be on the discovery of predictive, diagnostic, and prognostic biomarkers that will allow proper diagnosis of specific CV diseases, increase information about a particular disease, and indicate the direction treatment should take.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

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10 up votes
23 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

What about the impact of regulation of genes in response to external stimulation on human health trending idea

We are focusing a lot on the genes that may be protective or harmful to our lives. But what about the regulation of genes in response to external stimulations, such as psychosocial and/or environmental, that are probably more accountable for whether we live healthier or not.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Rationale: Years of research in the mind-heart field have set examples that looking at changes during dynamic stimulations (chronic, acute, and acute superimposed on chronic) are more meaningful for us to better understand how the body truly works. Therefore, research design in mimicking real dynamic process is necessary to truly capture the healthy or harmful phenotypes driven by genotypes. I suggest the NHLBI to establish a platform gathering resources to promote more sophisticated research from basic to clinical to better understand the underlying mechanisms of psychosocial impact on cardiovascular diseases that has come to a sizable problem for the human being in US and world wide.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

We have performed researches that allow us to identify phenotypes that are only appearing under emotional stress testing. Currently we are examining whether certain intervention may modify these kinds of changes. Even our studies fail to demonstrate changes with intervention, the findings support future studies focusing on testing dynamic changes under stress that reflects daily living. Resting data obtained in laboratory does not truly represent what human beings experiences.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Wei Jiang from Duke University

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