Showing 4 ideas for tag "donor"

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Human Heart Systems Biology

In the human failing heart, it is the systems biology that ultimately fails: electrical, mechanical, and chemical perturbations in their function do not manifest in isolation, but critically impact on each other in health and disease. Investigation of human myocardium, unlike inbred rodent models, is challenging since no two humans are identical. There is a need for the collection and assessment of clinical patient data,... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Procured/stored tissue from these hearts could be made available NHLBI/NIH-wide, and studied by a large number of investigators on protein levels, RNA/DNA level, and/or histological assessments. This data could then be correlated to any other parameter assessed on these hearts, providing correlative guidance, through systems biology/neural network programming, for future mechanistic studies. For each additional parameter investigated, the number of correlation analysis (with any and all parameters, including clinical and biometric parameters) would mathematically double.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Supporting the basic collection of these in vivo and in vitro parameters and possibly the logistics for tissue distribution to collect correlative mechanical, proteomics, genomics, and histology data for correlation with the in vivo and in vitro data would allow for an NIH/NHLBI-wide translational approach to human heart failure that could encompass everyone’s “favorite” molecule, protein, pathway, and disease etiology. A logistical challenge is that such a project would likely exceed the funding of a single standard grant, but more importantly would surely exceed the standard 4-5 year duration, requiring long-term vision, planning, and buy in from NIH/NHBLI and investigators.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Paul Janssen

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7 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Biorepository to facilitate epidemiologic studies of transfusion-transmitted diseases and validation of laboratory tests for don

There is a critical need for a proactive and coordinated effort to develop well-characterized biorepositories that can be used for epidemiologic studies of emerging infectious agents to expedite rapid implementation of donor screening tests for emerging pathogens and variants that pose a threat to the blood supply.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Globalization and climate change have enabled the spread of infectious diseases worldwide. Many new infectious agents that pose a potential threat to blood safety and availability and prevalent predominantly in other countries have emerged in the United States during the past few decades. They include but are not limited to West Nile virus, Dengue, Babesia, Malaria, Leishmania, Chikungunya, T. cruzi and Ebola which pose a safety concern and pandemic agents such as MERS, SARS and Pandemic Influenza that threaten blood availability. Rapid and timely implementation of effective intervention measures such as donor testing could greatly reduce morbidity and mortality resulting from transfusion of blood and blood products potentially contaminated by these agents. A key impediment is the lack of a pedigreed and universal biorepository of specimens that have been well characterized both serologically and genetically and by specific disease states for test developers to evaluate and validate candidate assays. A coordinated multi-center cross-expertise collaborative effort involving investigators in government, academia and industry is needed to successfully address this critical challenge for the blood supply.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

This initiative is feasible as investigators in blood organizations, academia and government are already working independently towards this goal in their defined areas of study. Through this initiative a coordinated, structured framework and mechanism to collect and characterize a universal biorepository of specimens from donors of Whole blood and their linked transfusion recipients, as well as Source Plasma donors could be developed. In addition, follow up specimens could be collected on an ongoing basis to generate a repository of linked, sequentially derived specimens which together with blood donor-recipient pairs could be useful for studies on utility of tests and evaluation of disease outcomes resulting from transmission of infectious agents. The repository could potentially include a variety of specimen types including plasma, serum, whole blood, cells, dried blood spots etc. collected on an ongoing basis over a period of a few years (5-10) for test developers to evaluate and validate assays as needed. This effort would also generate a database and useful datasets that could be informative for risk assessment as part of test implementation. Overall, by addressing this key barrier, a rapid response laboratory network could be established to perform the necessary epidemiologic studies and for test development to expedite timely implementation of donor testing, a major safety measure for reducing infectious disease transmission through the blood supply.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Office of Blood Research and Review, CBER, FDA

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12 up votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Improving blood supply by giving a pig a human bone marrow transplant from a universal donor

What do you think of giving a pig a human bone marrow transplant from a universal donor? The pig could produce blood for human use! Although the pig will eventual die of an autoimmune disease its life can be prolonged with all the new autoimmune medicines we have and/or the pig can be engineered to overexpress PDL1 (or a similar autoimmune suppressor). Additionally even if each pint of blood made this way might be... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea John D Marano

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Nefarious substances in the US blood supply

Prescription and illicit drug is everpresent in the US, which can potentially result in controlled substances entering the US blood supply. Passive transfer of immune allergens is only anecdotally been reported as peanut allergens, fish allergens, and contrast material. However, US blood donors are only screened for a limited number of medications on the universal donor health questionnaire at time of collection. What,... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Of the nearly 15 million blood products collected in the US (National Blood Collection and Utilization Survey), what percent of donations capture additional substances like medications and illicit substances. Healthcare providers may be unaware of potential adverse transfusion reactions that could arise from potent allergens within the products themselves.
If additional donor screening is required to reduce the number of medications/drugs entering the US blood supply, how best to do this? Via blood toxicology, urine toxicology, hair toxicology? Is there a need to marry the donor drug history with the recipient allergy list?

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

These questions would require blood collection centers to potentially revise how they screen blood donors. How and when to probe donations or donors will require extensive medical-legal investigation.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea LostInNashville

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17 down votes
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