Showing 2 ideas for tag "fatty"

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Fish Oil or Snake Oil: Is There Antiarrhythmic Benefit?

Does fish oil supplement intervention truly reduce arrhythmia burden in the general population?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

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Low-cost effect preventative antiarrhythmic therapy

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Low cost wearable, internet-connected devices make it possible to inexpensively collect heart rate and physiometric data from a large number of people to determine and predict arrhythmia risk.
Observational studies have suggested that either cardiac arrest or sudden death is associated with low dietary intake and blood levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and that a fish diet or dietary supplementation with polyunsaturated fatty acids (the GISSI-Prevenzione study) decrease mortality and/or sudden death following myocardial infarction. However, NHLBI-supported and other randomized, double blind studies of the antiarrhythmic efficacy of fish oil supplements in patients with a high arrhythmic risk and implantable cardioverter defibrillators have failed to demonstrate benefit. Similarly, fish oil supplements in patients at risk for atrial fibrillation (AF) have shown no benefit. Yet evidence from studies in laboratory animals continue to suggest that omega-3 fatty acids present in fish oil provide benefits that should be antiarrhythmic. These and other fundamental research studies in isolated tissues and laboratory animals continue to lead to uncertainty as to whether patients with cardiac arrhythmias may benefit from fish oil supplements.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Why are CHD Mortality Rates Much Higher in United States Than in Japan or Mediterranean Countries?

There remain very substantial unexplained international geographic variations in the incidence of CHD. Japan, for example, and some of the Mediterranean countries have CHD incidence rates for both men and women that are 1/3-1/4 of those in the United States.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

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Migrants from these countries have substantial increase in their CHD rates within a very short time after emigration to the United States or to other countries, strongly suggesting that fundamental genetic differences do not account for these variations in the rates. Reduction of the CHD rates in the United States to those in low risk countries will have the most profound effect on CHD and CVD incidence and mortality.

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Research to further evaluate the probable dietary determinants of these extremely low rates and their implications to the United States should be a high priority. This includes careful study of fatty acids, especially polyunsaturated fatty acids, soy proteins, etc., interrelationships with markers of inflammation and inflammatory diseases. Japan, for example, not only has low CHD rates but also low rates of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease even in the presence of high levels of cigarette smoking, multiple sclerosis, all of which would suggest that inflammation may be contributing to these variations in risk of disease. Furthermore, there is growing evidence that omega-3 fatty acids and perhaps other fatty acids may play an important role in T cell function and the development of CVD.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Lewis H. Kuller, MD, DrPH

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