Showing 3 ideas for tag "insomnia"

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

DEVELOPMENT OF BIOMARKERS FOR SLEEP INSUFFICIENCY, CIRCADIAN DISRUPTION AND SLEEP DISORDERS trending idea

There is an urgent need to develop quantifiable biomarkers for acute sleep loss, chronic sleep insufficiency, circadian disruption and sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea. These problems are highly prevalent but currently we do not have biomarkers to use for case identification, prognosis, or assessing response to therapy. There are currently small studies that indicate the feasibility. A recent workshop... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

The following will be the impact of addressing this critical challenge:

  1. Having an assessment that can be used following a crash to assess the level of sleep loss of the driver.
  2. Having a method to assess chronic sleep insufficiency as a potential pathogenetic process in patients with cardiovascular disease, hypertension, etc.
  3. Having a method to estimate circadian phase so that in patients with chronic insomnia one can identify individuals with delayed sleep phase.
  4. Having a technique to establish magnitude of circadian disruption to assess its role in pathogenesis of diseases such as cardiovascular disease.
  5. Add a molecular biomarker to other techniques to screen for obstructive sleep apnea in high risk populations such as obese commercial drivers.
  6. Utilize a biomarker signature to identify who with obstructive sleep apnea will be particularly at risk for downstream consequences such as cardiovascular disease.
  7. Develop the equivalent of HbA1C to assess therapeutic response to CPAP
Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

The first challenge is to identify a signature for each of these use cases. This will require initial studies in a small number of well phenotyped subjects with all the “-omic” techniques. Thereafter, these multiple cohorts, already available with blood samples, etc. and relative phenotype can be used for validation purposes.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Sleep Research Society

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

DEVELOPMENT OF A PERSONALIZED APPROACH TO SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN DISORDERS

There is developing evidence of major individual differences in pathways to different common sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea. Moreover, there is evidence of different clinical presentations of disease and different outcomes. For example, some subjects with obstructive sleep apnea who get excessive sleepiness while others do not. The latter are still at risk for other consequences of the disorder such... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

There is a strong rationale for application of a personalized approach to sleep disorders. This requires approaching this question using multiple domains as in other areas of medicine—clinical features, physiological factors, application of the –omic approaches, genetics. The impact of this will be several:

a. A new way to classify sleep disorders.
b. Identification of subgroups of patients with apparently the same disorder who will have different outcomes of therapy.
c. Identification of subgroups of patients who will have different approaches to diagnosis.
d. Identification of subgroups of patients with apparently the same disorder who will have different therapeutic approaches.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

These sleep and circadian disorders are extremely common. There is a risk infrastructure for this type of research based on the large number of accredited sleep centers in the United States that could be used for subject recruitment and who can adopt similar techniques. There is also a rich set of data obtained from sleep studies that could be used to identify new patterns that reflect different subgroups of subjects. These studies need to be based on clinical populations of patients who present with the different disorders rather than on population-based cohorts.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Sleep Research Society

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Research priorities: Sleep disorders in women

Women are more likely to have insomnia and they develop the condition at an earlier age than men. Hormone changes and menopause are two key factors but little is known about the mechanisms, which will inform the treatment. This is an understudied area of scientific focus with vast potential public health impact.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Women are more likely to have insomnia and they develop the condition at an earlier age than men. Hormone changes and menopause are two key factors but little is known about the mechanisms, which will inform the treatment. This is an understudied area of scientific focus with vast potential public health impact.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Systematic investigation of the hormonal basis and menopause symptom contribution to insomnia in midlife women requires skilled investigation and controlled study design given variability of symtpoms.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Hadine Joffe, MD MSc

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