Showing 3 ideas for tag "morbidity"

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Biologic mechanisms of prolonged morbidity in survivors of ARDS and sepsis

What are the biologic mechanisms and risk factors that lead to prolonged morbidity in survivors of ARDS and sepsis? What factors during the acute disease phase distinguish patients that recover from those that develop long-term physical, psychological, or cognitive deficits?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Reductions in mortality rates for ARDS and sepsis have led to an increase in the number of survivors. Many of these survivors develop new or worsened physical, mental, or cognitive morbidities that persist months or years after hospital discharge. Identifying the biologic mechanisms and risk factors during the acute disease phase that lead to prolonged morbidity could help develop therapies to prevent/treat the long-term morbidities and determine the subgroup of patients that interventions should target.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Research over the past several years has highlighted the increasing number of survivors of ARDS and sepsis that are at risk for long-term physical, psychological, and cognitive impairments. One challenge to answering this question is the limited availability of data and biospecimens of patients with ARDS or sepsis linked to long-term outcomes. Developing a robust resource for this work would require facilitation by NHLBI (potentially in collaboration with other NIH institutes).

Voting

-4 net votes
7 up votes
11 down votes
Active

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Effectiveness of three smoking cessation approaches

What is the comparative effectiveness and cost effectiveness of counseling plus nicotine replacement vs. counseling plus bupropion vs. counseling plus varenicline on smoking cessation rates, patient-reported outcomes (symptom frequency, activities of daily living, quality of life, sleep quality, exacerbations), and COPD and non-COPD morbidity/mortality?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Voting

1 net vote
4 up votes
3 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Reducing CV events in breast cancer survivors -knowledge gaps

Identifying breast cancer survivors at high risk for CV morbidity and mortality to allow targeting of management strategies to reduce CV events and thereby improve overall cancer-related survival.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Chemotherapy for breast cancer stages I-III is known to be associated with or induce cardiotoxicity. Over 35% of these women develop progressive fatigue and exercise intolerance, and heart failure limiting their daily activities and frequently interfering with their ability to return to work. CV disease are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality for those surviving beyond 5 to 8 years from their breast cancer diagnosis. The excess of CV morbidity and mortality in these patients threatens to offset reductions in cancer-related survival. Identifying breast cancer survivors at high risk for CV morbidity and mortality could allow targeting of cardiovascular disease reducing therapeutic interventions.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

creating a multisite registry of women with Stage 1-3 breast cancer scheduled to receive chemotherapy and a control population women of similar demographic and CV risk profile without neoplasia, would allow to collect data at baseline and during/after cancer treatment related modern therapy, pre/post treatment functional status, including fatigue, behavioral and psychosocial risk factors and quality of life, and serum biomarkers indicative of myocardial injury, fibrosis, and heart failure.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

Voting

-1 net votes
5 up votes
6 down votes
Active