Showing 9 ideas for tag "myocardium"

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Noninvasive biomarkers for characterizing cardiovascular disease

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Phenotypical characterization of cardiovascular disease with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MR) to individualize targeted therapies for coronary artery and myocardial disease. Coronary artery disease is a major cause of patient death in the United States. Nonischemic myocardial disease includes entities with clinically heterogeneous presentations and is thus challenging to manage.

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Currently CT and MR technology allows dynamic evaluation of the perfusion and contractility of the heart. Quantitative measures of disease burden, such as atherosclerotic plaque composition and myocardial texture imaging biomarkers (such as T1 mapping, activation mapping, flow pattern analysis, delayed myocardial enhancement), are possible. Positron emission tomography (PET)/MR, which combines metabolic with functional evaluation, is currently available and facilitates the development of targeted molecular-imaging techniques. Metrics derived from these techniques may serve to stratify patients noninvasively and direct appropriate therapies. Such imaging methods address noninvasive evaluation of cardiovascular disease, including ischemic heart disease but also myocardial diseases that include secondary and infiltrative cardiomyopathies, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and organ rejection in the scenario of transplantation.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Society of Thoracic Radiology

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Human Heart Systems Biology

In the human failing heart, it is the systems biology that ultimately fails: electrical, mechanical, and chemical perturbations in their function do not manifest in isolation, but critically impact on each other in health and disease. Investigation of human myocardium, unlike inbred rodent models, is challenging since no two humans are identical. There is a need for the collection and assessment of clinical patient data,... more »

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Procured/stored tissue from these hearts could be made available NHLBI/NIH-wide, and studied by a large number of investigators on protein levels, RNA/DNA level, and/or histological assessments. This data could then be correlated to any other parameter assessed on these hearts, providing correlative guidance, through systems biology/neural network programming, for future mechanistic studies. For each additional parameter investigated, the number of correlation analysis (with any and all parameters, including clinical and biometric parameters) would mathematically double.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Supporting the basic collection of these in vivo and in vitro parameters and possibly the logistics for tissue distribution to collect correlative mechanical, proteomics, genomics, and histology data for correlation with the in vivo and in vitro data would allow for an NIH/NHLBI-wide translational approach to human heart failure that could encompass everyone’s “favorite” molecule, protein, pathway, and disease etiology. A logistical challenge is that such a project would likely exceed the funding of a single standard grant, but more importantly would surely exceed the standard 4-5 year duration, requiring long-term vision, planning, and buy in from NIH/NHBLI and investigators.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Paul Janssen

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Development of non-contrast alternatives in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

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Late gadolinium-enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MR) plays a crucial role in the evaluation of patients with suspected myocardial scar tissue. Alternative methods to contrast-enhanced MR however are in need, given the number of patients who have concomitant compromised renal function and concern for nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. Noncontrast MR techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging would complement and eventually replace gadolinium administration thus impacting the evaluation of those with suspected and confirmed infiltrative cardiac processes and systemic diseases.

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Late gadolinium enhancement technique characterizes enhancement patterns of heart disease, identifies areas amenable to ablation, and aids in decisions pertaining to workup and therapy. The underlying mechanism of Brownian motion/diffusion in the expanded extracellular space makes diffusion weighted imaging a potential gadolinium-saving modality. Diffusion MR, applied primarily in the brain and abdominal imaging, is underutilized in the heart given respiratory and cardiac motion. A need exists to further develop and apply noncontrast MR techniques towards cardiovascular applications. Such methods are promising noncontrast alternatives to characterize patients with myocardial disease, determine those with differing prognoses, and direct appropriate therapies to subgroups.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Society of Thoracic Radiology

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Short comprehensive cardiac MR imaging in post-chemotherapy cancer patients

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Cardiovascular disease and cancer are frequently identified in the same patient. Both diseases are highly prevalent in the United States population, and cancer or its therapies can result in cardiovascular disease. Early diagnosis and prediction of cardiovascular disease in patients to undergo therapy will identify patients at higher risk for cardiac dysfunction and enable earlier diagnosis of subclinical cardiac dysfunction.

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Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MR) is a powerful imaging modality for evaluating the heart function. Specifically, MR techniques allow for quantifying regional heart function, e.g. strain and strain rate, and may provide earlier markers of cardiovascular disease development than global measures of heart function, e.g. left ventricular ejection fraction, as estimated by echocardiography. Early identification of subclinical heart failure of post-chemotherapy cancer patients will allow for early and on-time chemotherapy change and personalized treatment.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Society of Thoracic Radiology

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Exploring Future Cardiovascular Medicine: Heart Precursors Directed from Human Embryonic Stem Cells for Myocardium Regeneration

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major health problem and the leading cause of death in the Western world. Currently, there is no treatment option or compound drug of molecular entity that can change the prognosis of CVD.

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The human stem cell is emerging as a new type of pharmacologic agent of cellular entity that is much more complex in structure, function, and activity than the conventional drug of molecular entity, which is usually comprised of simple chemicals or compounds. Since the etiologies of most diseases that involve both molecular and cellular processes are much more complex than simple chemicals or molecules, conventional chemical drugs are often severely limited by the molecular entity of the compound that usually targets or blocks certain pathological molecular pathways, which would otherwise be harmful to common molecular pathways shared in normal cellular processes of vital tissues and organs, thus, cause severe toxic side effects that may outweigh the benefits. For instance, a drug for weight loss may cause severe damage to the heart. In addition, the therapeutic effects of conventional drugs of molecular entity provide only temporary or short-term symptomatic relief but cannot change the prognosis of disease. As a result, millions of molecular leads generated in mainstream of biomedical research from animal studies and studies of other lower organisms have vanished before even reach clinical trials, or for a few lucky ones, in clinical trials. In the last few decades, despite of many animal leads, no drug of molecular entity has ever been approved by FDA as a new treatment for heart disease and failure for humans.

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Opportunity: In contrast, the human stem cell has the potential for human tissue and function restoration that the conventional drug of molecular entity lacks. The ability of a human stem cell, by definition, to both self-renew and differentiation makes it a practically inexhaustible source of replacement cells for many devastating or fatal diseases that have been considered as incurable, such as neurodegenerative diseases and heart diseases. The pharmacologic activity of human stem cells is measured by their extraordinary cellular ability to regenerate the tissue or organ that has been damaged or lost, such as the heart in the case of human cardiac stem cells. Therefore, the pharmacologic utility of human stem cells cannot be satisfied only by their chaperone activity, if any, to produce trophic or protective molecules to rescue existing endogenous host cells that can simply be accomplished by a drug of molecular entity. The embryo-originated human embryonic stem cells (hESC) are not only pluripotent, but also incredibly stable and positive, proffering unique revenue to generate a large supply of cardiac lineage-committed stem/precursor/progenitor cells as well as functional cardiomyocytes as adequate human myocardial grafts for cell-based therapy. Currently, the hESC cardiomyocyte therapy derivatives provide the only available human cell sources with adequate capacity to regenerate the contractile heart muscles, vital for heart repair in the clinical setting.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Xuejun Parsons

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Deriving Cardiac Elements from Pluripotent Human embryonic Stem Cells for Heart Reconstitution

to date, the existing markets lack a clinically-suitable human cardiomyocyte source with adequate myocardium regenerative potential, which has been the major setback in developing safe and effective cell-based therapies for regenerating the damaged human heart in cardiovascular disease.

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Given the limited capacity of the heart for self-repair or renewal, cell-based therapy represents a promising therapeutic approach closest to provide a cure to restore normal heart tissue and function for CVD. There is no evidence that adult stem/precursor/progenitor cells derived from mature tissues, such as bone marrow, cord blood, umbilical cord, mesenchymal stem cells, patients’ heart tissue, placenta, or fat tissue, are able to give rise to the contractile heart muscle cells following transplantation into the heart. Despite numerous reports about cell populations expressing stem/precursor/progenitor cell markers identified in the adult hearts, the minuscule quantities and growing evidences indicating that they are not genuine heart cells and that they give rise predominantly to non-functional smooth muscle cells rather than functional contractile cardiomyocytes have caused skepticism if they can potentially be harnessed for cardiac repair. In recent years, reprogrammed or trans-differentiated adult cells, as a result of being backed by excess sum of government and private funding, have been rekindled as the adult alternates. However, major drawbacks such as abnormal gene expression, accelerated aging, immune rejection, not graftable, and extremely low efficiencies, have severely impaired the utility of reprogrammed or trans-differentiated somatic cells as viable therapeutic approaches.

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Opportunity: Derivation of pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) from the IVF leftover embryos has brought a new era of cellular medicine for the heart. The intrinsic ability of a hESC for both unlimited self-renewal and differentiation into clinically-relevant lineages makes it a practically inexhaustible source of replacement cells for human tissue and function restoration. Therefore, it has been regarded as an ideal source to provide a large supply of functional human cells to heal the damaged or lost tissues that have naturally limited capacity for renewal, such as the human heart and the human brain. Although a vast sum of NHLBI funding has been spent on looking for adult alternates, such as reprogramming and trans-differentiation of fibroblasts or mature tissues, so far, only human cardiac stem/precursor/progenitor cells derived from embryo-originated hESCs have shown such cellular pharmacologic utility and capacity adequate for myocardium regeneration in pharmaceutical development of stem cell therapy for the damaged human heart.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Xuejun Parsons

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Current State of Regenerative Medicine: Moving Stem Cell Research from Animals into Humans for Clinical Trials

Realizing the developmental and therapeutic potential of pluripotent human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derivatives has been hindered by the inefficiency and instability of generating clinically-relevant functional cells from pluripotent cells through conventional uncontrollable and incomplete multi-lineage differentiation.

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Realizing the developmental and therapeutic potential of pluripotent human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derivatives has been hindered by the inefficiency and instability of generating clinically-relevant functional cells from pluripotent cells through conventional uncontrollable and incomplete multi-lineage differentiation. Conventional approaches rely on multi-lineage inclination of pluripotent cells through spontaneous germ layer differentiation, resulting in inefficient, incomplete, and uncontrollable lineage-commitment that is often followed by phenotypic heterogeneity and instability, hence, a high risk of tumorigenicity. In addition, undefined foreign or animal biological supplements and/or feeders that have typically been used for the isolation, expansion, and differentiation of hESCs may make direct use of such cell-specialized grafts in patients problematic.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Opportunity: Recent technology breakthroughs in hESC research have overcome some major obstacles in bringing hESC therapy derivatives towards clinical applications, including establishing defined culture systems for derivation and maintenance of clinical-grade pluripotent hESC and lineage-specific differentiation of pluripotent hESC by small molecule induction. Such milestone advances and medical innovations in hESC research enable direct conversion of pluripotent hESC into a large supply of homogeneous populations of clinical-grade hESC neuronal and heart cell therapy products for developing safe and effective stem cell therapies. Currently, these hESC neuronal and cardiomyocyte therapy derivatives are the only available human cell sources with adequate capacity to regenerate neurons and contractile heart muscles, vital for CNS and heart repair in the clinical setting.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Xuejun Parsons

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Embedding the future of regenerative medicine into the open epigenomic landscape of pluripotent human embryonic stem cells

Large-scale profiling of developmental regulators and histone modifications by genome-wide approaches have provided powerful genome-wide, high-throughput, and high resolution techniques that lead to great advances in our understanding of the global phenomena of human developmental processes. However, without a practical strategy to convert pluripotent cells direct into a specific lineage, previous studies are limited... more »

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Large-scale profiling of developmental regulators and histone modifications by genome-wide approaches have provided powerful genome-wide, high-throughput, and high resolution techniques that lead to great advances in our understanding of the global phenomena of human developmental processes. However, without a practical strategy to convert pluripotent cells direct into a specific lineage, previous studies are limited to profiling of pluripotent human embryonic stem cell (hESC) differentiating multi-lineage aggregates, such as embryoid body that contain mixed cell types of endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm cells or a heterogeneous population of embryoid body-derived cardiac cells that contain mixed cell types of cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells. Their findings have been limited to a small group of genes that have been identified previously in non-human systems, and thus, have not uncovered any new regulatory pathways unique to human development. Although genome-wide mapping of histone modifications and chromatin-associated proteins have already begun to reveal the mechanisms in mouse ESC differentiation, similar studies in hESC are currently lacking due to the difficulty of conventional multi-lineage differentiation approaches in obtaining the large number of purified cells, particularly cardiomyocytes, typically required for ChIP-seq experiments.

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Opportunity: Recent technology breakthrough in lineage-specific differentiation of pluripotent hESC by small molecule direct induction allows generation of homogeneous populations of neural or cardiac cells direct from hESC without going through the multi-lineage embryoid body stage. This novel small molecule direct induction approach renders a cascade of neural or cardiac lineage-specific progression directly from the pluripotent state of hESC, providing much-needed in vitro model systems for investigating the genetic and epigenetic programs governing the human embryonic CNS or heart formation. Such in vitro hESC model systems enable direct generation of large numbers of high purity hESC neuronal or cardiomyocyte derivatives required for genome-wide (e.g., ChIP-seq) profiling to reveal the mechanisms responsible for regulating the patterns of gene expression in hESC neuronal or cardiomyocyte specification. It opens the door for further characterizing, identifying, and validating functional elements during human embryonic development in a comprehensive manner. Further using genome-wide approaches to study hESC models of human heart formation will not only provide missing knowledge regarding molecular cardiogenesis in human embryonic development, but also facilitate rapid progress on identification of molecular and genetic therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Xuejun Parsons

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

The Designation of Human Cardiac Stem Cell therapy Products for Human Trials or First-in-Human Studies

For successful pharmaceutical development of cardiac stem cell therapy, the human cardiac stem cell therapy product must meet certain commercial criteria in plasticity, specificity, and stability before entry into clinical trials.

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For successful pharmaceutical development of cardiac stem cell therapy, the human cardiac stem cell therapy product must meet certain commercial criteria in plasticity, specificity, and stability before entry into clinical trials. Moving stem cell research from current studies in animals into human trials must address such practical issues for commercial and therapeutic uses: 1) such human stem cells or their cardiac derivatives must be able to be manufactured in a commercial scale; 2) such human stem cells and their cardiac derivatives must be able to retain their normality or stability for a long term; and 3) such human stem cells must be able to differentiate or generate a sufficient number of functional or contractile cardiomyocytes for repair. Those practical issues are essential for designating any human cardiac stem cells as a human cardiac stem cell therapy product for investigational new drug (IND)-filing and entry into clinical trials. So far, the therapeutic effects, if any, of human cardiac stem cells in the existing market, including those derived from patients’ heart tissues, were mediated by protective or tropic mechanism to rescue dying host cardiomyocytes, but not related to myocardium regeneration.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Opportunity: Recent breakthrough stem cell technologies have demonstrated the direct pharmacologic utility and capacity of pluripotent human embryonic stem cell (hESC) therapy derivatives for human CNS and myocardium regeneration and, thus, have presented the hESC cell therapy derivatives as a powerful pharmacologic agent of cellular entity for a wide range of CNS and heart diseases. The hESC cardiomyocyte cell therapy derivatives by novel small molecule induction provide a large scale of high quality human cardiomyocyte source for myocardium regeneration and, thus, meet the designation of human stem cell therapy products in plasticity, specificity, and stability for commercial development and human trials or first-in-human studies in cardiovascular diseases.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Xuejun Parsons

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