Showing 3 ideas for tag "promotion"

Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Studying Health in Addition to Disease

Why do some people stop smoking after a stroke or myocardial infarction, whereas others do not? What motivates people who adopt a healthier diet and exercise program during their lifetime or after a significant health event? How can we promote healthier lifestyle choices at all stages of life? How do we ensure equitable health promoting activities for minorities, vulnerable populations, and lower socio-economic status... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Answering this critical question would enable us to have a more complete picture both of disease and of health.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

It is feasible to address this critical question because we need to expand our understanding of how people remain healthy or regain health, especially given the unhappy statistics concerning obesity, physical activity, blood pressure, diabetes, etc.
Few would disagree with the importance of studying the epidemiology, mechanisms, and progression of disease: research is focused on preventing or curing diseases. In addition to this disease-focused model, there are untapped opportunities to examine health and wellness. Borrowing from the field of Positive Psychology, which is the study of the aspects or characteristics of mental health (e.g., the strengths, values, behavior that contribute to well-being), we can expand this idea to study the aspects of those who remain healthy, who have retained health after disease, or who have successfully made healthy lifestyle changes. In terms of obesity, an example of this idea is Rena Wing’s National Weight Control Registry, which studies individuals who have successfully maintained long-term weight loss.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

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41 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Using Social Media to Promote Healthy Behaviors

Since most people know that there are behaviors that they need to do to be healthy, can we leverage peer or family pressure or use social media to create a “grass roots” groundswell of health-promoting behaviors?

How might social media platforms such as Facebook and Meetup.com be leveraged for designing low-cost research studies and interventions that promote sustainable healthy lifestyle and behaviors?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Given the massive use of mobile devices and social media in our society, engaging this critical challenge would have a significant impact on our understanding how this technology can be used in disease prevention and health promotion.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

It is feasible, timely, and cost-effective to study and incorporate into our interventions the use of social media because these applications are already so widely used.
Even if people haven’t memorized the American Heart Association’s seven factors related to heart health (get active, control cholesterol, eat better, manage blood pressure, lose weight, reduce blood sugar, stop smoking), most know that these are the behaviors that they need to do to be healthy. Despite this knowledge, heart disease is still the leading cause of death in the United States; about 1 in 3 U.S. adults has high blood pressure; diabetes affects nearly 26 million in the U.S.; and about 19% of U.S. adults are smokers. According to the CDC, in 2011 over 50% of those 18 years of age or older did not meet the recommended goal for aerobic exercise (150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity activity such as walking). Obesity is an epidemic: about one-third of American adults are obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2). People know what to do, but why don’t they do it? Our built environments and culture do not intrinsically promote a healthy lifestyle. In the absence of a culture that promotes walking or biking over driving cars and that promotes fast and fattening food over more healthy food choices, can we use peer networks to promote healthy behaviors? For example, Meetup.com is a tool that people use to meet for activities that include hiking, tennis, and physical fitness boot camps.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Qigong and Tai Chi for Chronic Disease Prevention

Non-pharmacological interventions for pain and stress have gained tremendous momentum.

Mind-Body Practice -- Qigong and Tai Chi -- are group based and inexpensive to implement. The evidence base suggests that these practices are safe and effective for a multitude of preventable chronic disorders..

THE QUESTION:
Given safety and efficacy, should there be vigorous research on implementation of Qigong and Tai Chi and... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

What can we do to assure that safe, effective, inexpensive non-parmacological approaches like Qigong and Tai Chi become widely diffused into communities, agencies, organizations, schools, health systems and businesses.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

We have participated in a number of studies that have contributed to the evidence base for Mind-Body Practice as a safe and effective non-pharmacological programming.

The key -- group based. For the financing, group based is inexpensive. For the efficacy group based supports compliance.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Dr Roger Jahnke, http://IIQTC.org

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33 up votes
31 down votes
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