Showing 37 ideas for tag "pulmonary"

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Biomarkers of Pulmonary Hypertension

What are informative and clinically relevant biomarkers of pulmonary hypertension (PH)?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

This research emphasis would help identify novel pulmonary hypertension biomarkers of disease risk and progression that can be used for early detection or as outcome measures in prevention trials or treatment of PH, which is a disease currently still not curable with high mortality rate.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

NHLBI Division of Lung Diseases just launched the multi-center PVDOMICS research program last September that will enroll ~1,500 patients in the next 5 years for deep phenotyping PH. PVDOMICS will provide a perfect foundation and platform for this proposed featured study about informative and clinically relevant biomarkers of PH, and make answering this proposed question more feasible in the next 5-10 years.
Although significant advances in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension have been made in the past two decades, currently pulmonary hypertension remains a devastating disease without many clinically relevant and specific biomarkers available. Novel new informative and clinically relevant pulmonary hypertension biomarkers would greatly help advance the subtype-specific early diagnosis and precision treatment of this disease that could potentially decrease the mortality of PH.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

Voting

75 net votes
87 up votes
12 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Optimization of Existing Therapies for Sickle Cell Disease

How can the safety, dosing and benefits of existing therapies for sickle cell disease such as hydroxyurea, be optimized in order to increase its efficacy and improve patient adherence?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Hydroxyurea is a widely available disease-modifying therapy for sickle cell disease (SCD), but its effectiveness is currently limited by inadequate utilization, and less than optimal response. Research is needed to improve adherence to this evidence-based therapy and emphasis needs to be placed on determining whether therapy with hydroxyurea can prevent or even reverse organ dysfunction. In addition, research identifying new adjunct therapies to blood transfusion and hydroxyurea, as well as disease-specific therapies for co-morbidities such as kidney disease, hypertension, obstructive lung disease, and pulmonary hypertension will be valuable in the management and treatment of SCD.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Alice Kuaban on behalf of the American Society of Hematology (ASH)

Voting

54 net votes
74 up votes
20 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

How can we non-invasively, but still accurately, measure blood pressure in the pulmonary arteries?

Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a complex, progressive condition characterized by high blood pressure in the lungs. The gold standard for measuring pressures in the pulmonary arteries is a right heart catheterization, where a special catheter is guided through the right side of the heart and into the pulmonary artery, the main vessel carrying blood to the lungs. This measurement is essential, as it allows physicians and... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

i. In patients with pulmonary hypertension, the use of multiple tests to characterize the type and severity has long been recommended by global experts; one commonly used diagnostic algorithm recommends more than ten different tests to accurately define this complex, heterogeneous disease. Despite the algorithm used, to confirm a diagnosis of one specific type of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), one must always directly measure the pressures in the heart and pulmonary artery through a right heart catheterization (RHC). Complications for this procedure are rare, but not non-existent with potentially 1 in every 100 patients having a right heart catheterization experiencing a serious adverse event (Hoeper MM 2006). Patients would significantly benefit from a non-invasive method of quantifying their pulmonary artery pressures and/or disease progression, but to date this has not been possible with echocardiography due to measurement errors (Laver 2014), CT scan due in part to measurement inconsistencies (Alhamad 2011), and cardiac MRI due to lack of standardization and multicenter trials (Peacock 2013). Not only would wider utilization of a non-invasive method of measuring pulmonary artery pressures and disease progression potentially reduce the risk from RHC, depending on the modality it could lead to earlier diagnosis of this progressive disease and/or application in countries where RHC is less common.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Addressing a non-invasive method of measuring pulmonary artery pressures requires investment in both technology and multicenter clinical trials to validate these measures.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Katherine Kroner, Michael Patrick Gray, PHA

Voting

67 net votes
75 up votes
8 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Would patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) benefit from background anticoagulation in addition to their PAH-targe

Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a complex, progressive condition characterized by high blood pressure in the lungs. For several decades, oral anticoagulation has been recommended by some societies for patients with a specific form of PH called pulmonary arterial hypertension. However, the evidence currently supporting this recommendation is very limited. To date, no prospective randomized clinical trial has been completed... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

The evolution of the anticoagulation recommendation in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a relatively logical one at face value. Early in the modern era of PAH management, a “thrombosis” in the small pulmonary arteries was identified and described; studies since then have demonstrated hypercoagulability in patients with severe disease. Together, these observations led to a theory that in-situ thrombosis contributed to the PAH disease progression and a belief that anticoagulation should be beneficial. The empirical evidence currently supporting this recommendation comes mostly from a retrospective cohort study of the European COMPERA PH registry and a systematic review of 7 retrospective cohort studies that are at least 10 years old—2 of which did not suggest a survival benefit—and in a time where only 4 of the widely used PAH-targeted therapies were approved by the FDA. Purely based on observational evidence with a number of potential biases, warfarin (Coumadin) is widely used in PAH management to this day. Warfarin in this patient population is not without its risks, as some subgroups of PAH patients are at increased risk of bleeding complications based on their disease process alone. Assessing the true benefit of this widely used background therapy could allow clinicians and patients to more accurately weigh the risks and burden of anticoagulation with a true understanding of the survival benefit.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Addressing this compelling question is indeed feasible through an NIH-sponsored randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of anticoagulation in patients with certain types of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Katherine Kroner, Michael Patrick Gray, PHA

Voting

62 net votes
68 up votes
6 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

How can we increase the pharmaceutical clinical research of targeted therapies in pediatric PAH patients, including encouraging

Clinical research, especially randomized pharmaceutical clinical trials, poses many unique challenges compared to research in adult subjects. In pulmonary arterial hypertension, a disease characterized by high blood pressure of the lungs with increased pulmonary vascular resistance leading to right ventricular failure, there are 12 FDA-approved PAH-targeted therapies for adults. None of these medications are currently... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a heterogeneous condition generally characterized by high blood pressure in the lungs and increased pulmonary vascular resistance that leads to right heart failure if left untreated. Though some causes of PAH are seen in both adult and pediatric populations, some etiologies are seen exclusively in pediatric populations, including persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, lung hypoplasia, and alveolar capillary dysplasia. Despite these differences in disease etiology, and known physiologic differences in pediatric populations, inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) in the acute setting is the only approved medication for PAH treatment in children. A number of issues have decreased pediatric PAH pharmaceutical research, including protection of the pediatric population as vulnerable subjects, principle of scientific necessity, balance of risk and potential benefit, parental consent/child assent, and feasibility of pediatric clinical trial design and implementation. Encouraging clinical trials of existing adult medications and potentially emerging, novel agents specifically for pediatrics—either through direct sponsorship or regulatory incentives—would not only lead to better outcomes for pediatric PAH patients, but potentially to a better and more comprehensive characterization of the developing pulmonary vascular system and right ventricle.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Several challenges exist for addressing this critical challenge. First, there are a number of differences between conducting clinical research in pediatric populations compared to adult populations. This not only includes the broad items referenced above, but items as noted by Rose and colleagues related to clinical trial design and analysis including (1) accepted age-matched normal ranges for laboratory values; (2) requirements for the validation of clinical endpoints for the assessment of efficacy and safety; and (3) standards for long-term safety monitoring and pharmacovigilance (Rose K, et al. NEJM 2005). Sponsorship of this type of clinical research is a second concern, which could either be mitigated by direct support from the National Institutes of Health of pediatric PAH clinical trials or in regulatory changes incentivizing pediatric clinical research in rare diseases.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Katherine Kroner, Michael Patrick Gray, PHA

Voting

66 net votes
76 up votes
10 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

In pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), how can right ventricular function be improved in the setting of increased afterload

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a complex, progressive condition characterized by high blood pressure in the lungs and restriction of flow through the pulmonary arterial system. Significant improvements have been made in medical management with through approved pulmonary vasodilator therapies. However, long-term right ventricular afterload reductions have still not yet been achieved. The process by which the... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Understanding of many components of the PAH disease state have evolved significantly in the past thirty years. When initially described by an NIH registry, in a time where pulmonary transplantation was the only treatment for PAH, the average life expectancy of PAH patients was estimated to be 2.8 years. Since then, 12 PAH-targeted therapies have been approved by the FDA; these therapies primarily act by dilating the pulmonary arteries in order to allow blood to flow easier through the pulmonary vascular system. Despite these advances and complex therapies, long-term afterload reduction is not achievable in most PAH patients. Patients continue to die from right ventricular failure, highlighting the important relationship of the pulmonary arterial system and right ventricle. Little is known about how and why the RV progresses from hypertrophy to full RV failure, the diagnostic signs indicating early RV failure, and how best to intervene to support the failing ventricle. Knowledge in this area is critical, however, as the RV is able to recover in many patients with severe PAH after lung transplantation. The relationship between the lung vasculature and cardiac function, and specifically a characterization of RV failure, was included as a research opportunity in the Strategic Plan for Lung Vascular Research in an NHLBI-ORDR Workshop Report (Erzurum S, et al. 2010).

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

The primary challenge of addressing this CQ on how right ventricular function can be improved in the setting of increased afterload is the comprehensive analysis and support that will need to be provided, spanning from basic to clinical science. To begin, strong support of biologic characterization of the right ventricle needs to be provided. The RV is distinctly different from the more comprehensively studied left ventricle (LV), and subsequently responds differently to changes in pressure, neurotransmitters, hormones, and pharmaceutical therapies to name only a few. However, when identified, these RV biologic distinctions can be further explored to develop a better understanding of RV failure and potential points of intervention.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Katherine Kroner, Michael Patrick Gray, PHA

Voting

65 net votes
72 up votes
7 down votes
Active

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Increasing Regenerative Medical Strategies in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a complex, progressive condition characterized by high blood pressure in the lungs and restriction of flow through the pulmonary arterial system. Current PAH therapies mainly act of the vasoconstrictive component of the disease; however there is a widely accepted view that another contributor to the disease is an abnormal overgrowth of cells that line the pulmonary arteries, which... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

In the past twenty years, 12 PAH targeted-therapies have been approved by the FDA. This increase in disease state awareness and in the treatment armamentarium have contributed to an increase in average survival from 2.8 years to an estimated 8-10 years. However, current treatments primarily address the vasoconstrictive component of the disease and do not address the now accepted theory of post-apoptotic overgrowth of hyperproliferative cells of the pulmonary vessels. A number of circulating stem and progenitor cells, derived from the bone marrow, have been identified that could have roles in repair of the pulmonary vascular system when interacting with the quickly, abnormally growing cells in the lung vessels. Work in this area has been named as a future research opportunity in the NHLBI-ORDR Strategic Plan for Lung Vascular Research (Erzurum S, et al. 2010).

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Basic and translational research support is needed—including high-throughput approaches such as phage display and large-scale proteomic analysis—to better understand the relationship between circulating bone marrow-derived cells, lung-resident stem and progenitor cells, and endothelial cells of the pulmonary arterial system.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Pulmonary Hyeprtension Association, Michael Gray, Katie Kroner

Voting

71 net votes
81 up votes
10 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Development of right ventricular-targeted therapies in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a complex, progressive condition characterized by high blood pressure in the lungs and restriction of flow through the pulmonary arterial system. A great increase in the treatment armamentarium has been noted for this rare disease in the past 20 years, with 12 new PAH-targeted therapies. Though these therapies do improve cardiac performance, this is most likely due to their primary... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Since 2006, 12 medical therapies for PAH have been approved by the FDA, which have increased survival of this rare disease from around 2.8 years to approximately 9 years; these therapies primarily act by dilating the pulmonary arteries in order to reduce pulmonary vascular resistance to blood flow. However, patients continue to die from right ventricular failure, highlighting the important relationship of the pulmonary arterial system and right ventricle (RV). Despite patients ultimately dying from RV failure, little is known about the effect of the currently available PAH-targeted therapies on RV functional support. Prostacyclins, PDE5i, and sGC agonists are thought to enhance RV contractility—though the long-term effects remain unknown—while ERAs are thought to reduce it. The direct RV effect of some potential therapies targeting the pseudo-malignancy theory of PAH is a concern, as these therapies seek to reduce the hypertrophy and angiogenesis that may actually be supporting the adapting RV. Further, therapies targeting the ventricle directly have historically been centered on the LV—for example β-adrenergic receptor blockers and RAS inhibition—and either remain controversial or without data in the RV. There remains no identified RV-specific therapy to either provide support through increase contractility or molecularly prevent the progression from RV hypertrophy to ultimate failure.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

The primary challenge of addressing this CC on the lack of RV-targeted therapies for the treatment of PAH is the comprehensive analysis and support that will need to be provided, spanning from basic to clinical science. To begin, strong support of biologic characterization of the right ventricle needs to be provided. The RV is distinctly different from the more comprehensively studied left ventricle, and subsequently responds differently to autocrine, paracrine, neuroendocrine, pressure, and pharmaceutical changes to name only a few. However, when identified, these RV biologic distinctions can be translated and tested clinically to more comprehensively and appropriately treat the RV-arterial uncoupling ultimately leading to right heart failure: through both reduction in afterload and an increase in contractility.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Katherine Kroner, Michael Patrick Gray, PHA

Voting

66 net votes
75 up votes
9 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Identifying Early Stages of Pulmonary Fibrosis

The majority of translational research designed to improve the lives of patients with pulmonary fibrosis has focused on studies of patients with advanced fibrotic lung disease. In contrast, little effort has been paid to understanding the natural history of pulmonary fibrosis, exploring the mechanisms/pathogenesis of the development of pulmonary fibrosis, and considering work designed to prevent the development of lung... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Pulmonary fibrosis has a mortality rate greater than that of most malignancies. Although medical therapy is finally available for some of these patients, this therapy, at best, results in a reduction in the rate of lung function decline and a reduced rate of mortality. Preventing the development of pulmonary fibrosis could result in substantial reductions in the morbidity and mortality experienced by those at risk.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Identifying patients with early stages of pulmonary fibrosis is not only feasible but is likely to be an expected result of the increase in chest CTs obtained through lung cancer screening. Increased consensus in the community about what defines early stages of pulmonary fibrosis will be needed for this field to truly move forward. It remains possible that medical and other targeted intervention trials could be initiated in patients felt to have early stages of pulmonary fibrosis.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Gary "Matt" Hunninghake

Voting

29 net votes
35 up votes
6 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Triggers of cellular and molecular pathway decompensation during pulmonary exacerbations.

What triggers decompensation of cellular and molecular pathways during exacerbations of chronic lung diseases?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Elucidation of molecular and cellular pathways driving and sustaining exacerbations in chronic lung diseases. Specifically, (1) discover what perturbs antecedent conditions precipitating mal(adaptive) compensatory mechanisms leading to pulmonary exacerbation including impact of heterogeneous resilience and concomitant chronic diseases and (2) clarify response heterogeneity of longitudinal molecular and cellular signature during treatment and recovery.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Longitudinal pulmonary exacerbation research nested with clinical care can be initiated within 1-2 years. As part of clinical care leveraging digital education/data (electronic health/medical records and attendant meaningful use requirements), an N-of-one research design could become self-sustaining within health care systems.
Pulmonary exacerbations exhibit multiple pathogenic pathways various concurrent pathophysiological pathways, and diverse clinical manifestations. Prevention and treatment of pulmonary exacerbations is hampered by this complex biology that is dynamic and appears to vary during the course of exacerbations. Progress toward precision medicine for exacerbations may require organization of a new taxonomy for disease, which reflects a set of clinically meaningful and exploitable similarities and differences between disease traits (exacerbation polypathomics).

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

Voting

13 net votes
23 up votes
10 down votes
Active

Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Establishment of an independent study section on Pulmonary Vascular Biology and Translational Research

The research on pulmonary vascular biology including smooth muscle cell biology and endothelial cell biology and related pulmonary vascular diseases such as pulmonary hypertension and related right heart failure, and endothelial dysfunction in lung vascular inflammation and acute lung injury, as well as pulmonary embolism and lung transplantation has been rapidly expanding. The field is attracting an ever increasing... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Establishment of a study section on Pulmonary Vascular Biology and Translational Research will provide adequate funding to stimulate innovative research on this rapidly expanding field and promote translational research and thereby promote human health by providing potential novel therapeutic strategies for the devastating diseases such as pulmonary hypertension and acute lung injury.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Youyang Zhao, Kurt Denmark, Asrar B. Malik, Mark Gladwin, Jahar Bhattacharya, Michael Matthay, Sharon Rounds, Jason Yuan

Voting

23 net votes
50 up votes
27 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Fibrosis Across Organs: Bringing Together Investigators of Fibrosis of the Heart, Lungs and Bone Marrow

Fibrosis can affect essentially any tissue or organ, including the heart, lungs and bone marrow. Effective anti-fibrotic therapy has long been elusive, and transplantation has been the only therapy capable of restoring patient function as fibrotic diseases progress to organ failure. Although these diseases present clinically with organ-specific manifestations, they are now thought to share many common pathogenetic mechanisms.... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

In the aggregate, diseases characterized by fibrosis have been estimated to account for up to 45% of developed world deaths. Fibrotic diseases addressed by the NHLBI include heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and myelofibrosis (MF), among many others. Each fibrotic disease represents an area of great unmet clinical need, as patients suffer and die with no or limited effective disease-modifying therapies. The impact of developing effective therapies for each of these diseases individually would be great; the impact of developing therapies effective for the entire class of fibrotic diseases across organs would truly be enormous. The clinical burden of HFpEF is staggering – more than 650,000 new patients are diagnosed with heart failure in the US each year, half with diastolic dysfunction. Although not as prevalent, IPF and MF are particularly lethal. IPF has a median survival of approximately three years. MF is arguably the most aggressive of the myeloproliferative disorders and is associated with significantly shortened survival. Although agents such as spironolactone have been unable to treat fibrosis in HFpEF as yet, two anti-fibrotic drugs, pirfenidone and nintedanib, have now been shown to slow progression of IPF, and the oral JAK1/2 inhibitor ruxolitinib has been shown to improve MF survival. These early successes underscore the great impact that developing effective anti-fibrotic therapies will have.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

This challenge could be addressed by funding research efforts to identify and therapeutically target fundamental pathogenetic mechanisms shared by fibrotic diseases across organs. Although fibrotic diseases present clinically with organ-specific manifestations, there has been a growing appreciation of that these diseases share many aspects of their pathogenesis. Fibrosis In many of these diseases results from recurrent or non-resolving epithelial or endothelial injury, followed by over-exuberant or aberrant mesenchymal cell responses. Across all organs, these processes result in the pathologic accumulation of fibroblasts and extracellular matrix, with distortion of organ architecture and loss of organ function. Core pathways leading to epithelial and endothelial cell injury and senescence, to fibroblast accumulation and persistence, and to altered matrix biochemical and biomechanical properties, are now being identified. Therapeutics developed to target these core pathways could have broad clinical applicability. Funding initiatives aimed at better the characterization of core fibrotic pathways already identified, the identification of new core fibrotic pathways, and the development of therapies to target core fibrotic pathways, could allow the NHLBI to simultaneously and cost-effectively address the great unmet needs of the large patients with any of the many devastating fibrotic diseases that affect the heart, lungs and bone marrow.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Andrew M. Tager

Voting

16 net votes
20 up votes
4 down votes
Active

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

What is the comparative effectiveness of short-term vs. chronic (e.g., 12 mo) pulmonary rehabilitation?

What is the comparative effectiveness of short-term vs. chronic (e.g. 12 mos) pulmonary rehabilitation on survival, patient-reported outcomes (symptom frequency, activities of daily living, quality of life, sleep quality, exacerbations), healthcare utilization, and costs from a societal and healthcare system perspective?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Modest sized efficacy trials demonstrate substantial health benefits, that wane as Pulmonary rehabilitation is discontinued. We need to test the health and resource implications of "chronic" (e.g., 12 or 24 mos) pulmonary rehabilitation. Such information will benefit health systems seeking to implement care models for high-risk, costly, patients - patients with COPD are of increasing interest to health systems. Such a comparative effectiveness trial should also involve behavioral interventions to promote self-management and involve caregivers.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Jerry Krishnan

Voting

26 net votes
32 up votes
6 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Pulmonary rehabilitation

Can pulmonary rehabilitation change the course of COPD? Is pulmonary rehabilitation a disease-modifying therapy? Does pulmonary rehabilitation improve survival? Does pulmonary rehabilitation reduce readmissions?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Pulmonary rehabilitation is the most effective therapy for COPD, leading to reduced shortness of breath and improved exercise capacity. It is under-utilized because of the relative paucity of studies evaluating its efficacy on mortality, hospitalization and hospital readmission.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Feasibility is very high. In the NIH National Emphysema Treatment Trial, a standardized pulmonary rehabilitation program was developed and implemented at multiple sites, many of which did not have existing pulmonary rehabilitation programs. The effective of this pulmonary rehabilitation program was documented (Chest 2005; 128:3799). Challenges include maintenance of the benefits of pulmonary rehabilitation using modern approaches to increase adherence.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Barry Make

Voting

20 net votes
26 up votes
6 down votes
Active