Showing 3 ideas for tag "quantitative"

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Noninvasive biomarkers for characterizing cardiovascular disease

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Phenotypical characterization of cardiovascular disease with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MR) to individualize targeted therapies for coronary artery and myocardial disease. Coronary artery disease is a major cause of patient death in the United States. Nonischemic myocardial disease includes entities with clinically heterogeneous presentations and is thus challenging to manage.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Currently CT and MR technology allows dynamic evaluation of the perfusion and contractility of the heart. Quantitative measures of disease burden, such as atherosclerotic plaque composition and myocardial texture imaging biomarkers (such as T1 mapping, activation mapping, flow pattern analysis, delayed myocardial enhancement), are possible. Positron emission tomography (PET)/MR, which combines metabolic with functional evaluation, is currently available and facilitates the development of targeted molecular-imaging techniques. Metrics derived from these techniques may serve to stratify patients noninvasively and direct appropriate therapies. Such imaging methods address noninvasive evaluation of cardiovascular disease, including ischemic heart disease but also myocardial diseases that include secondary and infiltrative cardiomyopathies, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and organ rejection in the scenario of transplantation.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Society of Thoracic Radiology

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Quantitative imaging biomarkers for chronic lung disease

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Methods for stratifying patients with diffuse lung disease are crucial for predicting their clinical course and directing appropriate therapies accordingly. Currently imaging markers for prognostic stratification are limited, due to observer variability in characterizing the type and degree of computed tomography (CT) abnormalities. A reproducible method for categorizing varying diffuse lung diseases on CT imaging is needed, particularly in combination with other biomarkers in a multidisciplinary approach. With lung cancer screening, the characterization and stratification of patients with varying COPD phenotypes and interstitial lung disease are essential to aid in management of the large number of patients who currently satisfy criteria for CT lung cancer screening.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Currently the classification of diffuse lung disease on CT is based upon visual evaluation and qualitative or semi-quantitative evaluation of CT data. Diffuse lung disease manifests with varying CT findings and distribution within the lung. Computer-assisted tools for quantifying airways and parenchymal disease have been developed. More-sophisticated quantitative computer image-analysis methods, such as those that address three-dimensional spatial orientation, are possible given advances in computer capabilities yet remain in need of further development. Advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MR) technology, positron emission tomography (PET), and PET/MR will increase the ability to characterize diffuse lung disease quantitatively. The ability of such technology to differentiate subtypes within more frequently occurring and clinically-significant diffuse lung disease is feasible. Such tools would impact a large population, particularly given the potential need to phenotype emphysema and smoking-related interstitial pneumonias in those undergoing CT screening.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Society of Thoracic Radiology

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Imaging indicators of metabolic syndrome and cardiopulmonary disease

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Obesity and metabolic syndrome affect a large portion of the population and affects multiple organ systems. Identifying obesity phenotypes by imaging will impact the significant healthcare issue presented by MetS and could provide a reliable, non-invasive index of disease severity, guide prevention and intervention response.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Metabolic syndrome, abnormal metabolism, may be potentially linked to obesity and cardiopulmonary disease. Theories exist but are in need of clarification. The relationship between metabolic syndrome and multiple other diseases including chronic obstructive lung disease, coronary atherosclerosis, and obesity warrants further investigation and can be elucidated through imaging. Advances in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MR) enable assessment of the cardiopulmonary manifestations, with promising MR techniques to complement high-resolution imaging data achievable with chest CT and coronary CT angiography. Assessment of CT and MR techniques in combination with three-dimensional quantitative analysis of manifestations of metabolic syndrome such as fat deposits derived from different adipocytes (white fat versus brown fat) such as in the subcutaneous, visceral, epicardial, and perivascular regions is feasible with current technology and may enable differentiation of those with varying risks of cardiovascular and pulmonary disease. The association of imaging parameters, metabolic syndrome, and associated diseases are in need of investigation, and knowledge gained may prove crucial for identifying those at risk for metabolic syndrome and at higher risk for complications in the large population of our country affected by obesity.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Society of Thoracic Radiology

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