Showing 9 ideas for tag "red"

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Apheresis Medicine in the Management of Sickle Cell Disease

Despite advances in care, patients with sickle cell disease have significant morbidity and mortality. One challenge is the optimal use of simple vs exchange transfusion vs no transfusion when managing these patients. Simple transfusions lead to iron overload while exchange transfusions may expose patients to increase numbers of red blood cell units. The mechanism of benefit from transfusion (oxygen delivery vs marrow... more »

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SCD is the most common genetic disease in the United States affecting 100,000 individuals or 1 in 400 African American births. Pain, stroke, acute chest syndrome and priapism are common morbidities affecting patients with sickle cell disease, which often result in emergency room visits and/or hospitalizations. Despite advances in treatment, sickle cell disease is associated with significant mortality and shortened life expectancy. Defining the optimal role of red blood cell exchange and plasma exchange (which may be used to remove plasma molecules such as inflammatory factors and free hemoglobin) in the management and prevention of the complications of sickle cell disease and may not only prolong the life of these patients but is expected to improve the quality of their lives. In addition, clearly defining the indications for simple verses exchange transfusion therapy has the potential to minimize both alloimmunization to red blood cells (reported to occur in up to 75% of patients with sickle cell disease) and iron overload associated with transfusion.

Transfusion therapy may be efficacious to sickle cell patients by providing increased oxygen delivery to tissues and/or decreasing the amount of sickle hemoglobin present by suppression of erythropoiesis. Understanding the relative contributions of these mechanisms will assist with optimal use of transfusion therapy as well as inform the development of novel alternative therapies

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Multi-center trials should be feasible, given the number of patients with sickle cell disease in the US. Participation by larger academic centers which care for sickle cell patients should facilitate trials. Methods for automated red cell exchange and plasma exchange are available and in common use at many centers. Great interest exists among physicians caring for sickle cell patients (as exemplified by the recent NIH consensus document and ASFA sickle cell consensus conference) which is a strength of this proposal. Challenges include agreement on standard treatment protocols across centers and long term follow up of patients. Maintaining vascular access in sickle cell patients is another challenge when performing apheresis procedures on sickle cell patients

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Bruce Sachais on behalf of ASFA

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Anemia, oxygen delivery, and red blood cell transfusion

In neonatal, pediatric, and adult patients with critical illness, what is the best means to identify: (1) the degree to which anemia contributes to insufficient oxygen (O2) delivery and (2) the likelihood that O2 delivery will be improved by red blood cell (RBC) transfusion?

These questions are most relevant to critically ill populations that exhibit unique physiology, including those with low cardiac output (cardiac... more »

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In the critically ill, RBC transfusion is indicated to improve O2 delivery. Although RBC transfusion increases hemoglobin concentration (Hb) and thereby blood O2 content, it does not necessarily follow that O2 delivery to tissues is likewise increased. Current approaches to transfusion decision making in critical care settings maintain an ‘adequate’ RBC mass well above a level that may limit tissue O2 delivery. With improved understanding of vascular signaling and gas transport by RBCs and of the array of defects comprising the RBC ‘storage lesion’, we appreciate that this strategy must be balanced by consideration that: (1) donor and recipient RBCs do not exhibit similar physiology and (2) RBC transfusion may cause harm (beyond transfusion reactions and transmission of infection) – and that this harm appears progressive with: transfusion volume, frequency and donor exposure. As such, ‘restrictive’ Hb thresholds for RBC transfusion are appreciated to be at least non-inferior to ‘liberal’ Hb thresholds for a broad array of conditions. A paradigm shift is emerging in approach to the critically ill, with re-consideration of the ‘Hb trigger’ strategy, itself. Ideally, the decision to transfuse should be based upon individual and context-specific consideration of the degree to which anemia contributes to tissue O2 delivery.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

We need to identify specific physiologic endpoints linked to outcomes as well as determine the appropriate thresholds for these goals. We must improve current means to assess functionality of the circulating RBC mass and its specific relationship to tissue O2 delivery in both humans and animal models. Approaches to resolve this gap could be conducted in the following areas during the next 3-5 years (studies may be independent or ancillary to clinical transfusion trials). Examples include but are not limited to the following: (1) clinical and translational research studies examining physiologic tolerance of acute and chronic anemia in the critically ill populations; (2) basic and clinical research exploring accuracy, precision and reliability of novel approaches to quantify and monitor O2 consumption and delivery (global/regional). Investigations should also determine the relationship of these measures to clinically relevant patient outcomes, both global (mortality, ventilator dependence, length of stay, etc.) and organ-specific; and (3) studies evaluating the process of transfusion decision making in the setting of critical illness.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Nareg Roubinian, MD and Naomi Luban, MD for the 2015 NHLBI State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine.

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Biology of Red Blood Cell Alloimmunization

What determines which individuals will develop RBC alloimmune responses resulting in clinically meaningful sequelae?

This question encompasses: 1) the generation of alloantibodies that limit the availability of compatible blood or cause hemolytic disease of the fetus or newborn (HDFN); 2) the distinction between clinically significant and insignificant alloantibody responses, especially within alloantibody specificities... more »

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Humans exposed to RBC alloantigens, following therapeutic transfusion or in pregnancy following maternal exposure to fetal RBCs, can generate humoral alloantibodies capable of leading to hemolytic transfusion reaction, (HTR), or of leading to HDFN. RBC transfusions can also induce autoantibodies, and can lead to hyperhemolysis. It is poorly understood why some patients mount a detectable alloantibody response (“responders”), whereas others do not (“non-responders”). Within the responder population, alloantibodies may be categorized as “clinically significant” or “clinically insignificant”, based upon whether the resultant specific alloantibodies have been previously reported to cause HTR or HDFN. However, incompatible transfusion will only result in meaningful in vivo hemolysis in some patients, even with antibody specificities classified as clinically significant.

The ability to define responder/non-responder status before initial RBC exposure has the potential to: 1) decrease rates of RBC alloimmunization in responders through the provision of extended matched RBCs for initial and subsequent RBC exposure; 2) conserve valuable antigen negative RBC units for patients who will derive the greatest benefit; 3) conserve transfusion service resources in terms of time spent identifying antibodies and procuring antigen negative RBC units; and 4) decrease rates of HTR and HDFN.

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Patients with hemoglobinopathies, especially those with SCD and thalassemia, have high rates of RBC alloimmunization and thus are important target populations for these studies. The impact of methods to reduce RBC antigen exposure or pathogen inactivation on neoantigen development remains unknown. The health impact of addressing the question of RBC alloimmunization is that the discovery of mechanistic underpinnings will provide a rational basis for the development and translation of novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, with a goal of increasing transfusion safety.

Though these questions are unlikely to be completely answered within the next 3-10 years, existing and emerging immunohematology and genomics tools, evolving sophistication of animal models, and existing and novel systems for human studies including donor-recipient repositories have the potential to increase the understanding of when and how alloimmunity to RBCs evolves, in what contexts it is clinically significant—even life-threatening—and how this important, but currently challenging and poorly understood condition, might be prevented and/or mitigated.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Nareg Roubinian, MD and Naomi Luban, MD for the 2015 NHLBI State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Evidence based approaches to Red Blood Cell transfusion

What are the optimal RBC transfusion thresholds for adult and pediatric cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy regimens that may improve functional status and quality of life?

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Cancer patients undergo intensive medical and surgical therapies to treat their underlying disease. Treatment commonly results in anemia requiring RBC and platelet transfusions to support the patient through the hypoproliferative phase of chemotherapy. This is particularly true for those patients requiring hematopoetic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Following therapy, cancer outpatients commonly receive RBC transfusions for weeks to months to maintain their functional status.

Common causes of death in patients with hematological malignancies and other cancers are infections and bleeding. A meta-analysis of clinical trials suggested that liberal transfusion is associated with greater risk of infection. Conversely, restrictive transfusion could adversely affect quality of life and functional status in oncology populations. In addition, pre-clinical and clinical studies support that concomitant anemia and thrombocytopenia significantly compound bleeding risk, and that hemostasis can be optimized in thrombocytopenia by maintaining a higher hematocrit. Although bleeding risks in relation to platelet transfusion thresholds are well studied in patients with hematological malignancy, optimal hemoglobin levels in thrombocytopenic patients are not known. Despite the significant allocation of blood components to cancer patients as a whole, RBC transfusion practices are not well studied within this group.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Randomized controlled clinical trials and other studies investigating optimal transfusion thresholds and other measures of practice are required to provide health care providers with evidence to guide one of the most common therapies administered in the setting of malignancy. The clinically important end points of well-designed studies could include: 1) quality of life and functional status for both inpatients and outpatients; 2) neurocognitive development in pediatric populations; 3) bleeding events / bleeding scores; 4) impact on immunity including immunomodulation and infection; 5) reconstitution of hematopoiesis; and 6) survival and/or recurrence of disease.. Besides a generalizable study population, certain target populations of interest are those with high risk disease, HSCT patients, patients undergoing radiation therapy, and pediatric patients.

There are >1.6 million new cases of cancer annually in the USA, including >50,000 with leukemia and >6,000 with HSCT. Cancer therapies are rapidly advancing in the era of genomics and immunotherapy. Capitalizing on the tradition of research in cancer, single and multicenter studies of RBC transfusion are feasible using randomized controlled designs in conjunction with clinical trials of chemotherapeutic regimens. The results of these studies will impact a large patient population’s quality of life, and may ultimately impact healthcare cost and blood demand.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Nareg Roubinian, MD and Naomi Luban, MD for the 2015 NHLBI State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Stem Cell Biology

There is a need to develop “designer platelets” and “designer red cells,” as well as facilitate large-scale production of these products for therapeutic and diagnostic use.

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The reprogramming of adult stem cells has resulted in the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that can develop into any tissue of the body. These iPSCs ultimately may be used as a transplantable source of stem cells for a variety of hematologic diseases. Although this technology has enabled the generation of patient-specific or disease-specific stem cells that are also amenable to genetic manipulation, the major scientific hurdle has been the ability to create clinically meaningful functional blood products, including transplantable HSCs from differentiating iPSCs. The production of clinically functional blood products -- i.e. red blood cells derived from autologous iPSCs --could replace allogeneic products in highly immunized patients and the generation of megakaryocytes for patient-specific platelet production from iPSCs could drive significant progress in this area. Furthermore, disease-specific iPSCs could serve as targets for both drug development and drug screening in patients with rare hematologic disorders. In addition, support for scale-up and GMP processes, which are difficult to fund via the R01 mechanism will require specific grant opportunities tailored to infrastructure and process development.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Alice Kuaban on behalf of the American Society of Hematology (ASH)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

The potency and safety of transfusable red blood cells

Can we identify approaches to improve potency and/or safety of transfusable RBCs?

42 day pre-transfusion storage of RBCs maximizes utilization, while minimizing waste. However, RBCs undergo changes during collection, manipulation and storage that may reduce their potency or safety. Progress in understanding markers that predict transfusion success at the time of collection and with storage remains slow. New technologies... more »

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While novel RBC storage methods have been described, the mechanisms underlying their efficacy has not been defined, a step that will be important for further improvements in this area. Some of these methods appear to improve efficacy of the RBC bioenergetic pathways; however, to date there have not been notable advances in reducing cytoskeletal defects common in stored RBCs. The development of new RBC preservation methods that minimize the impact of the storage lesion on specific areas of concern (e.g., diminished oxidation/peroxidation, decreased membrane fragility) is needed.

 

Use of ex vivo generated RBCs is an alternative to conventional donor-derived RBCs which can potentially improve product consistency, reduce the storage lesion, and improve safety. However, advances are needed before this approach is feasible on a large scale. While the development of blood substitutes including blood pharming will likely require more than 3-10 years before it can be ready for the clinic, Blood Pharming from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells is now technically feasible and the recent development of genome editing methods suggests the exciting possibility of generating GMP compliant “immortal” stem cell sources to produce transfusable RBCs.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Research should include both pre-clinical and clinical studies to define optimal combinations of known factors preserving red cells (e.g. hypo-osmolarity, energy sources, antioxidants), and the development of methods for RBC pathogen reduction that do not increase the storage lesion.

Procedures for generating blood cells from cultured stem/progenitor cells is not currently cost-effective, limiting near term applications to special patient populations such as specific RBC phenotyping of rare donors for chronically transfused patients. Areas of research needed to advance the development of blood substitutes and blood pharming include: (a) new approaches to blood substitutes including artificial oxygen carriers generated from red cell lysates/components or engineered from combinatorial chemico-biological approaches (e.g., derivatization of hemoglobin, encapsidation of modulated oxygen carriers); (b) a better understanding of the biological properties of cultured RBCs with the goal of reducing blood pharming costs; (c) optimizing methods to expand stem cell populations while allowing differentiation to selected clinically relevant blood cell populations at clinically relevant levels; and (d) optimizing methodologies that faithfully replicate embryonic development to develop the cells of interest.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Nareg Roubinian, MD and Naomi Luban, MD for the NHLBI State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Re-evaluating Hemoglobin Thresholds for Red Blood Cell Transfusion Decisions

Are there specific conditions where a liberal transfusion strategy results in lower 30-day mortality as compared to a restrictive transfusion strategy?

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 Clinical trial data show that in multiple patient populations, a 7 to 8 g/dL hemoglobin threshold for red blood cell transfusion is safe. However, equipoise for transfusion thresholds persists in patients with ischemic heart disease and acute neurological conditions where a higher hemoglobin level may decrease ischemic injury to myocardial and cerebral tissues, respectively. Alternatively, liberal red blood cell transfusion may be associated with adverse outcomes such as pulmonary edema or increased rates of heart failure. In other populations, it is possible that even lower transfusion thresholds than 7 g/dL would be safely tolerated. On the other hand, if a 7 g/dL threshold is found to be superior to a lower threshold, this would establish a minimal appropriate threshold to initiate red blood cell transfusion.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Multicenter clinical trials that utilize markers of oxygen consumption are needed to answer these questions. A pilot study in patients with acute myocardial infarction demonstrated that recruitment was feasible for clinical scenarios in which equipoise exists. An international setting where the safety and availability of the blood supply remain significant issues may be best suited to answer the question of whether transfusion thresholds lower than 7 g/dL are safe.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Nareg Roubinian, MD and Naomi Luban, MD for the 2015 NHLBI State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Mitigating risks due to the RBC storage lesion and vulnerable patients

What are the underlying dependencies (genomic, metabolic, disease) in individual donors that either accelerate or delay the changes to red blood cells during refrigerated storage? What methods of preparation might protect patients from the risks posed by the accelerated degradation of RBCs provided by "poor storers"? What characteristics of individual patients make them particularly vulnerable to transfusion of red... more »

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The changes in red blood cells during refrigerated storage have been well documented and associated with negative clinical sequelae in the peer reviewed literature. While the impact of this so-called storage lesion does not impact every patient during every transfusion it is reasonable to expect that when a unit of blood is transfused to a particularly vulnerable patient from a donor that has red blood cells pre-disposed to degradation, stored in a manner that has allowed significant change to occur, the risk of a negative clinical sequelae is increased. In this case it will be important to understand what underlies the likelihood of a donors blood to store poorly, the changes that occur during storage that could impact vulnerable patients and design approaches to mitigate the degradation that could result.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

We believe mitigating the impact of the storage lesion is feasible by reducing and controlling the oxygen concentration in the RBC unit prior to refrigerated storage. We are continuing our development of a device to do this and to generate the data demonstrating the effect of deoxygenation and anaerobic storage.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Andrew Dunham

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Genomics in transfusion medicine

How can RBC genomics be utilized to improve outcomes with transfusion?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

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Prevention of alloimmunization with transfusion
Improved understanding of RBC epitope diversity

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Utilize advances in genomics medicine to better understand impact of transfusion and to improve outcomes.
Limited donor pool, particularly in minority populations, presents challenges

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