Showing 6 ideas for tag "response"

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Development of Novel Apheresis Adsorption Technologies to More Effectively and Safely Treat Hematologic Diseases

Current FDA approved apheresis technology currently uses elutriation/centrifugation separation techniques to remove pathologic cellular and/or plasma elements. These techniques are non-specific, limited by inefficient removal kinetics and often require considerable blood product exposure. Despite tremendous improvement in our understanding of the pathophysiology of a variety of disease, our ability to treat many of... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

More efficient and novel means of selectively removing pathologic cellular and/or plasma elements are needed when a disease specific pathologic cellular element or plasma element is identified (i.e. anti-RBC autoantibodies in patient with severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia, anti-platelet antibody in patients with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura, anti-platelet factor four antibodies associated with heparin associated thrombocytopenia, complement fixing, donor specific antibodies in antibody mediated cardiac rejection, antibodies implicated in catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome, mediators of the inflammatory response in sepsis, etc. ).

These are especially needed in patients who are critically ill and in need of rapid removal of these pathologic blood elements. Selectively and rapidly removing disease associated cellular and/or plasma elements while returning the remainder of the patient’s cells and/or plasma can minimize additional blood product exposure with its attendant risks, reduce duration of treatment significantly, and offer new forms of treatment either not available in the U.S. or not previously considered.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Selective removal of pathologic plasma elements has been demonstrated by the development of selective adsorption columns which bind inflammatory mediators and immunoglobulins, but are not currently being used in the U.S. Current technology exists to remove specific pathologic plasma elements. For example, immunoadsorption technology, which incorporates polyclonal sheep anti-human IgG antibodies bound covalently to sepharose columns can remove >98% of all IgG subclasses after multiple treatment sessions. Similar effect can be obtained by Protein A sepharose column (Prosorba) technology which had been approved for use by the FDA for rheumatoid arthritis; however, in 2006 the manufacturer stopped producing the column due to financial reasons. Clearly, research into the use of these columns in the context of well designed, randomized clinical trials would be readily feasible with the appropriate IND and require industry support.

Furthermore, the technology that is used to couple sheep anti-human IgG antibodies to sepharose, can used to create antigen specific adsorption columns for removal of specific pathologic antibodies, for example, anti-PF4 antibodies that are involved in heparin associated thrombocytopenia, or Clq dependent (C1q) donor specific HLA antibodies that are involved in antibody mediated cardiac rejection. Industry support/small business grant support will be needed for development of these columns in addition to clinical trials demonstrating efficacy

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Edward Wong on behalf of ASFA

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112 up votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Novel Cell Apheresis Technologies to Treat Hematologic Diseases

Current FDA approved apheresis technology uses elutriation/centrifugation or filtration separation techniques to remove pathologic cellular and/or plasma elements. Currently these techniques are non-specific, limited by inefficient removal kinetics and often require considerable blood product exposure. Despite tremendous improvement in our understanding of the pathophysiology of a variety of disease, our ability to... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Novel means of selectively removing unique cellular elements involved in disease modulation are needed. For example, microparticles (MPs) have been implicated in a variety of biological processes such as: a) coagulation (e.g. platelet MPs has shown to be 50-100 times more procoagulant than activated platelets), b) oxidative stress (e.g. promotion of oxidative stress via endothelial-, monocyte-, or lymphocyte-derived MPs), and c) inflammation (e.g. acute lung injury in a rat model of acute lung injury). In regards to specific hematologic disease, the hypercoagulability associated with sickle cell disease, for example, may be the result of chronic hemolysis and circulating cell-derived MPs originating from activated platelets and erythrocytes. Endothelial progenitor cells when infused into patients with acute myocardial infarction have been shown to improve ventricular ejection fraction, cardiac geometry, coronary blood flow reserve and myocardial viability. Finally, apheresis for cells of the immune system such as T regulatory cells, cytotoxic T cells, monocytes, dendritic cells, and NK cells will be useful in immunotherapy approaches to hematologic disease. Removal of unique cellular elements may result in amelioration/treatment of associated diseases, or conversely, infusion of these cellular elements may be used to treat disease via a cellular therapy approach. Currently, apheresis methodologies that can selectively remove these unique cellular elements do not exist

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Large scale cell separation of unique cellular elements requires new approaches. Although there are no prototypic cell separation devices that can be used for clinical purposes, the emergence of microfluidic technologies have demonstrated alternatives to current cell separator technology. For example, microfluidic technology has utilized imaging/optical signal-based, magnetic, dielectrophoretic, mechanical/hydrodynamic, and molecular cell surface recognition principles to effect cell separation. Recently, acoustic separation of tumor from normal cells has been developed and offers a unique method for label free cell separation. Clearly, research into the use of these cell separation technologies on a clinical scale would require significant research and development/small business grant support and industry input with eventual need for clinical trials of these new devices to demonstrate utility.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Edward Wong on behalf of ASFA

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118 net votes
139 up votes
21 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Environmental stimuli and the lung: predictors of homeostatic or pathological responses

What are the molecular and cellular responses in the lung that occur after environmental stimuli that predict homeostatic resilience or transition to disease, disorder, or aging?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Addressing this line of research could define biomarkers and pathways useful for prediction of how human response to an external stimulus of varied nature (i.e. microorganism, chemical, physical) could lead to specific outcomes in relationship to the duration of the exposure and the genetic makeup of the individual exposed. Identification of early signals and the pathways involved could lead to novel preventative or therapeutic approaches.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Methods for systems biology approaches to address complex pathobiological iterations are ready to be exploited to answer these questions.
Great progress has been made in the clarification of basic mechanisms of molecular and cellular response to environmental stimuli, in cross-sectional analyses. The continuum of the response in relationship to the genetic background of individuals responding with a homeostatic or pathological long-term outcome is missing from these data.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Using "omics" technologies to define responders to drug therapies

Metabolomic and proteomic technologies open tremendous avenues to define at the systemic level and, in the case of the lung, the organ level response to drug and non-drug interventions. The concept of responders and non-responders to therapies is poorly defined and hampers development of biomarkers and appropriate animal models. Omics technologies can bridge these important areas. In lung disease, breath analysis could... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

This work would be slow because it requires analyzing profiles of metabolomes from many drug classes. This long term project is needed to better understand the biological effects of new drugs coming to market.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea nkenyon

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13 up votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Need to Determine the Basis for Difference in Response to Weight Management Approaches

Why does the response to weight loss regimen in terms of weight loss and its sustainability, and improvement in health outcomes vary considerably?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Past research focused on using variations of diet and exercise has revealed important information about the health benefits of weight loss. The limitations of such approaches in producing biologically meaningful and sustained weight loss for the majority have also been recognized. Even within a study population, compliance to weight loss regimen, weight loss and its sustainability, and improvement in health outcomes vary considerably. Research is needed to identify the basis for this variation, which may lead to enhanced outcome and applicability of such approaches.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Identifying factors that enhance weight management response may lead to translational studies that yield more effective results. A strong support of promising clinical translational research may promote a conducive environment for developing more practical applications.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea The Obesity Society

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Immune-Mediated hematologic disorders

What is the optimal approach to prevent and treat immune mediated hematologic disorders (autoimmune hemolytic anemia, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, etc) and complications of hematologic disease (inhibitors in hemophilia, transfusion-related alloimmunization, etc)

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Therapies for these disorders are suboptimal and current treatments are associated with significant side effects. Transfusion is limited by development of alloantibodies..

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

NHLBI should support clinical trials in this area. Improved understanding of the biology and biomarkers predictive of disease development would aid in defining therapeutic approaches and trials.

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