Showing 30 ideas for tag "stem"

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Bone Marrow Stem Cell Transplant in Peds sibling matched SCD

There is a need to improve accessibility of Bone Marrow Stem Cell Transplantation (BMSCT) for Sickle Cell Disease patients who are most likely to benefit from this treatment option.

1. Building a culture of trust between and among primary care providers, specialists, patients/families, and other stakeholders

2. Consensus building around BMSCT as an acceptable treatment alternative (as opposed to another research endeavor)... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC
  1. It could potentially decrease the prevalence of SCD and significantly decrease the overall morbidity and mortality associated with SCD in children with matched sibling donors.
  2. It could increase the awareness of health professionals who have a low awareness of the role of BMSCT in the treatment and cure of SCD (i.e., those in rural areas)
  3. It can improve patient/family access to information and communications to facilitate informed discussion and choice for all SCD treatment options
  4. It could open the gateway for more therapeutic applications for other genetic diseases
Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC
  1. The science in this has evolved substantially such that BMSCT is a viable therapeutic option with reduced morbidity and mortality in the sibling matched population
  2. There is an opportunity to broaden current collaborations with other agencies and the BMSCT community to expand the accessibility of their research forward.
  3. Other agencies are emphasizing work in the area of BMSCT particularly for hemoglobinopathies.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

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52 net votes
80 up votes
28 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

The Importance of the Microbiome in Recovery after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

Do modifications in the recipient gut or lung microbiome affect development of tolerance and immunologic recovery after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) and can re-institution of a more normal microbiome lead to improved outcomes?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

HCT leads to profound changes in the host microbiome. Some small studies indicate that differential recovery of the gut microbiome is associated with differential outcomes, including graft-versus-host disease and mortality. Less is known about the pulmonary microbiome. Better understanding of the role of the microbiome in facilitating posttransplant recovery could lead to easily administered interventions and provide important insights into the role of different subpopulations of the microbiome on the health of all people.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Preclinical and clinical studies of this area would be greatly facilitated by a microbiome repository linked to high quality clinical data and would provide opportunity for insight into the role of the microbiome in health and disease.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Mary Horowitz

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117 net votes
152 up votes
35 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Transplantation across HLA barriers in aplastic anemia

Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is curative in aplastic anemia with much less intrinsic toxicity than transplantation in hematologic malignancies. The recent BMT-CTN trial demonstrated 97% survival at one year with little subsequent decline. However patients without matched related or unrelated donors have graft-rejection rates of up to 50%. Preliminary data from the Netherlands suggests that anti-thymocyte globulin... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

The use of umbilical cord blood or haploidentical donors has proven effective in patients with hematologic malignancies, but in non-malignant disorders outcomes are limited by graft rejection. Overcoming rejection in this context would be applicable to other non-malignant disorders such as thalassemia, sickle cell anemia, and other congenital disorders of hematopoiesis.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

It will require a large coordinated network like BMT-CTN to obtain sufficient patients studied in a uniform fashion to provide consistent reproducible data. .

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Joseph Antin

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110 net votes
137 up votes
27 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

What is the place of curative therapies in the management of Sickle Cell Disease

Advances in the care of pediatric patients with sickle cell disease ( SCD) have resulted in improved survival to adulthood.However, adulthood is marked by rapid disease progression, impaired quality of life and premature mortality. Hematopoietic cell transplantation(HCT) from matched sibling donor has curative potential, but has been offered mainly to children. Refinements in the conditioning regimen, supportive care,... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

To overcome this obstacle to progress in the field, we propose the creation of the funding mechanisms for a multicenter clinical trial consortium which would bring together investigators in field and facilitate study the outcomes of CT for patients with different types of donors and stem cell sources and compare them to outcomes in phenotypically matched controls receiving best available standard of care.Answering the compelling question about the role of CT in the management of SCD has the potential to have a catalytic effect in progress in this field. Patients are are then more likely to receive CT or standard of care at the appropriate time and in the manner in which they are most likely to have a positive outcome. This has the potential to reduce morbidity and premature mortality and in the long run, to decrease the burden of the disease on the healthcare system. The advent of clinical trials of gene therapies for SCD offers the prospect of even greater applicability of curative therapies. Thus, a consortium developed to answer this CQ would serve as a crucial vehicle for providing access to a greater proportion of patient to these personalized curative therapies . Such studies would also be powered to answer the question about who should receive the curative therapy, when they should receive it, and how it would impact their SCD related complications, late effects, survival and quality of life and help families make informed choice appropriate for their situation.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

The increasing applicability and acceptability of HCT for SCD is evidenced by the doubling in the number of such procedures reported to CIBMTR in the decade starting 2001. Refinements in conditioning regimen and supportive care continue to improve outcomes in children and now in adults with SCD undergoing HCT from HLA matched related donors. Recently, HCT from unrelated donors and from haplo-identical donors have further increased the applicability of HCT. Opening of gene therapy trials has further raised the prospect of cure for a greater proportion of patients. These developments are evidence of the feasibility of recruitment to large multi-center comparative trials of SCD and standard of care. Recently, there has been increasing collaboration among investigators in the field with informal consortia being developed by investigators coming together to study HCT for children, adults or HCT from haplo-identical donors. These groups are also increasingly working with SCD hematologists, families and other stakeholders. There is also increasing cross-cutting collaborations with other medical specialists and behavioral and translational scientists Thus, the convergence of several factors described above suggests that the time is fortuitous for a major initiative from the NHLBI to bring investigators together and create the infrastructure that will enable these investigators to seek definitive answers to the challenging question “What is the place of curative therapy in SCD?”.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Lakshmanan Krishnamurti, MD, Allistair Abraham MD, John Horan MD and members of the Sickle cell Transplantation and Research Alliance

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112 net votes
141 up votes
29 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Can we break the silos at NHLBI? Why are we not working on studiying heart and lung issues in blood cancer survivors?

There is an increasing number of blood cancer survivors in the United States. Many of them have treatment induced heart and lung comorbidities (i.e CHF, pulmonary fibrosis, early aging, etc). However, there does not seem to be a concerted effort by the NHLBI to leverage their relationship with the NCI or the BMT CTN to address this issue. NHLBI should be developing a funding mechanism for cardiopulmonary researchers to... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Would create an infrastructure for cardiopulmonary researchers to work with hematology researchers.
Reduce burden of therapy with curative intent
Develop insight into cardiopulmonary diseases outside of the cancer arenal

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Very feasible with the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network and the National Clinical Trials Network

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Sergio Giralt

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66 net votes
96 up votes
30 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

How can we develop more selective immunosuppression for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation?

Graft versus host disease (GVHD) remains the most significant complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). While the use of HCT has grown significantly safer and has demonstrated broad efficacy in the setting of a broad range of blood diseases, immunosuppressive therapy has not dramatically evolved since the introduction of calcineurin inhibitor-based approaches decades ago. The availability... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

GVHD remains a critical problem and major barrier to the more widespread utilization of HCT, especially for nonmalignant diseases, where tolerance of treatment-related mortality is understandably low.

There is a compelling need for novel immunosuppressive agents that can effectively limit alloreactivity mediated by donor T and B cells, while relatively sparing pathogen-specific T cells, including those mediating antiviral T cell responses important in the post-HCT interval.

In the past decade, drug development has facilitated the introduction into preclinical and clinical trials of a broad range of agents that in addition to targeting pathways of interest in target cells (e.g., aberrant signaling in cancer cells) may also effectively inhibit T and/or B cell responses. Examples include hypomethylating agents (e.g., azacitidine), HDAC inhibitors (e.g., vorinostat), MEK inhibitors (e.g., trametinib) and BTK inhibitors (e.g., ibrutinib). Each of these classes of agents has been demonstrated in preclinical and/or clinical studies to also limit alloreactive T cells, and/or augment regulatory T cell responses, leading to a net reduction of alloreactivity. Unlike traditional agents (e.g., the calcineurin inhibitors) these agents appear to be more selective, and in some cases may have dual benefit in reducing relapse.

The NHLBI can facilitate the identification and translation to clinical practice in the setting of HCT trials of novel immunosuppressive agents.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Research funding targeted to improving the pipeline of novel immunosuppressive agents could have immediate and dramatic impact in the field of HCT, especially impacting its application for nonmalignant diseases. Patients lacking optimal registry donors, especially those from underrepresented minority groups, will particularly benefit from improvements in immunosuppression, as patients receiving less than optimally matched donors are at much higher risk of GVHD.

The NHLBI can encourage and facilitate research that tests compounds that have already passed through the drug development process, but in many cases were not intended to function as immunosuppressive agents. Compelling preclinical studies have suggested that targeted inhibition of T and B cells, and/or epigenetic modifiers can lessen alloreactivity while preserving beneficial cellular immune responses and facilitating immune reconstitution.

It will be far easier to appropriate therapeutic agents already developed for another purpose than to do novel drug development from scratch. In many cases, preclinical studies have highlighted the therapeutic potential in immunosuppression for agents that have been developed to treat malignancies, but yielded suboptimal success. Research that encourages the development of these drugs as part of a combined immunosuppressive/immunomodulation approach may rescue such compounds, while yielding potential dramatic advances in clinical HCT.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Krishna Komanduri, M.D.

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106 net votes
129 up votes
23 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

The role of Extracorporeal Photopheresis (ECP) in the prophylaxis and treatment of acute & chronic Graft Versus Host Disease

In Acute Graft Versus Host Disease (aGVHD), we would like to examine whether early and intensified delivery of ECP as part of standard prophylaxis will decrease overall corticosteroid exposure while preserving expected relapse rates in patients undergoing unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).
Chronic GVHD (cGVHD) is common after HSCT (30-50% recipients) and is a major contributor to late transplant-related... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Patients who develop aGVHD undergo toxic therapy with high-dose corticosteroids, often for long durations, resulting in high morbidity and treatment related mortality. Alternatively, T cell depletion of the donor graft to reduce GVHD is associated with high rates of infection and relapse of the disease that led to the HSCT. Targeting other pathways of GVHD pathogenesis may preserve the beneficial immune reconstitution and graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects, while ameliorating the severity of GVHD. One such pathway involves regulatory T cells (T regs), which inhibit T cell alloreactivity, and are correlated with the incidence and severity of GVHD without loss of GVT. To date, there is no consensus on a standard second-line therapy for aGVHD, and current approaches focus mainly on intensification of immunosuppression. Addressing this compelling question will help to decrease overall corticosteroid exposure while preserving the expected relapse rates in patients undergoing unrelated donor HSCT.

Appropriate initial therapy for cGVHD involves high doses & prolonged use (yrs) of corticosteroids, while patients still develop irreversible sclerotic manifestations of disease. Early intervention prior to disease onset may help prevent cGVHD development or lessen its severity, requiring less corticosteroid exposure. Addressing the compelling question for cGVHD will help decrease exposure to drugs with associated morbidity, while preserving expected relapse rates in these patients.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Feasibility:

  • GVHD has relatively high incidence after HSCT and at the same time there is a lack of consensus on standard second line therapy for the disease. Thus, there will be increased interest in developing and participation in those studies.

** ECP is generally well tolerated and complications are infrequent.

*** There is a great potential for multi-discipline collaboration approach in this patients’ population.

*** There is an opportunity to engage industry partners in the design and support for these studies.

**** There are numerous scientific opportunities for meritorious science as there have been limited systematic studies of ECP mechanisms of as well as standardization of apheresis protocols based on GVHD disease state.

 

 

Challenges:

  • Limited number of institutions providing ECP treatment.

** Cost of the procedures (although Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services now covers ECP for cGVHD).

*** There is a very limited number of animal models available for apheresis research in general, and studies of the mechanism(s) of action of photopheresis have been very limited as well as difficult and expensive to perform. However understanding pathological mechanisms and its relationship to response to apheresis is critical for optimization and advancement of patient care.

****Lack of infra-structure for apheresis research.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Joseph Schwartz on behalf of ASFA

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103 net votes
126 up votes
23 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Translational research supporting stem cell therapy for cardiovascular disease

Translational research supporting stem cell therapy for cardiovascular disease, including: core laboratories for preclinical IND-enabling studies (e.g., PACT), and clinical trials networks for evaluating promising new treatments (e.g., CCTRN).

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

The most cost effective scientific procedure ever utilized to answer the risk benefit question posed by a new intervention to be used in humans is a clinical trial. Major clinical trials are their most effective when planted in controversial ground (MRFIT, CAST, ALLHAT). Like these studies, which were caught in a controversial dynamic of uncertainties and disparate sets of expectations, a clinical trial network to assess cell therapy is precisely what is needed.
Experienced researchers recognize the current inimical environment of cell therapy. Now - as before - some forces argue that new therapy offers no benefits, while other equally vehement constituents contend that the benefits of therapy are so great, and the risks so small, that the treatment requires little if any regulation and should be available at once to the US public. Each side provides thunder, but little light.
It is precisely in this contentious environment where passions argue beyond the data that clinical trials are required. Their construction of the most objective view of the strengths and weaknesses of the intervention comes at a cost, but the answers these well designed and concordantly executed studies provide is the clearest illuminations of the benefits and risks of human cell therapy.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Based on the unmet clinical needs in the treatment of cardiovascular disease and the compelling early evidence for the promise of cell therapy, NHLBI created the Cardiovascular Cell Therapy Research Network in 2007. Now in its ninth year, the Network has completed three major clinical trials in cell therapy. It has published 35 manuscripts in prestigious clinical journals including JAMA, Circ, and Circ Research. Its biorepository has published two manuscripts relating baseline phenotype findings to measures of left ventricular function. A fourth clinical trial is underway assessing the effect of cell therapy on peripheral vascular disease. The Network is also proceeding with the largest effort to assess the effect of CSC cells in patients with heart failure - the first clinical trial that will assess the effect of combined cell therapy in heart failure patients. In addition, CCTRN will study the effect of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells in patients with anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy. Each of these protocols is NHLBI and FDA approved.
CCTRN’s reputation of conducting and then promulgating the results of high quality clinical trials makes it the most effective mechanism to assess the benefits of cell therapy in cardiovascular disease. It is important to continue to fund the infrastructure already in place to ensure its continued high quality operation and its place as the cornerstone of cardiovascular clinical cell therapy research in the United States.

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115 net votes
149 up votes
34 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Increasing Regenerative Medical Strategies in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a complex, progressive condition characterized by high blood pressure in the lungs and restriction of flow through the pulmonary arterial system. Current PAH therapies mainly act of the vasoconstrictive component of the disease; however there is a widely accepted view that another contributor to the disease is an abnormal overgrowth of cells that line the pulmonary arteries, which... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

In the past twenty years, 12 PAH targeted-therapies have been approved by the FDA. This increase in disease state awareness and in the treatment armamentarium have contributed to an increase in average survival from 2.8 years to an estimated 8-10 years. However, current treatments primarily address the vasoconstrictive component of the disease and do not address the now accepted theory of post-apoptotic overgrowth of hyperproliferative cells of the pulmonary vessels. A number of circulating stem and progenitor cells, derived from the bone marrow, have been identified that could have roles in repair of the pulmonary vascular system when interacting with the quickly, abnormally growing cells in the lung vessels. Work in this area has been named as a future research opportunity in the NHLBI-ORDR Strategic Plan for Lung Vascular Research (Erzurum S, et al. 2010).

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Basic and translational research support is needed—including high-throughput approaches such as phage display and large-scale proteomic analysis—to better understand the relationship between circulating bone marrow-derived cells, lung-resident stem and progenitor cells, and endothelial cells of the pulmonary arterial system.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Pulmonary Hyeprtension Association, Michael Gray, Katie Kroner

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71 net votes
81 up votes
10 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Stem Cell Biology

There is a need to develop an artificial and functional hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche that allows for the expansion of repopulating HSCs.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Methods to expand hematopoietic stem cells have continued to be examined extensively because stem cell numbers in the graft are important for clinical outcomes following transplantation. These numbers are particularly relevant in umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation, where low numbers of stem cells are directly related to delayed hematopoietic and immune reconstitution. Improved HSC expansion strategies may significantly impact transplantation outcome, enabling broader applications beyond UCB transplantation. Furthermore, these strategies are also needed to realize the full therapeutic potential of genome editing technologies to correct hematopoietic stem cells derived from patients with hematologic disorders. Since efforts to expand HSCs in cytokine-supported liquid cultures have been largely unsuccessful, efficient expansion will require an appropriate context that is provided by the hematopoietic stem cell niche. Future studies must also evaluate how niche signals regulate stem cell function to optimize cell expansion, and proper humanized mouse models must be developed to help predict stem cell function and regulation by the niche.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Alice Kuaban on behalf of the American Society of Hematology (ASH)

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28 net votes
46 up votes
18 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Measuring and Improving Physical Fitness to improve outcomes after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

Can cardiorespiratory fitness prior to hematopoietic cell transplantation be improved and will this limit morbidity and mortality following transplantation?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

HCT is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality from transplant-related complications, the reduction of which would lead to higher transplant-mediated cure rates for life-threatening benign and malignant hematologic disorders. Comorbidity and patient-reported functional status impairment are known to increase the risk for transplant-related mortality, but unlike comorbidity, cardiorespiratory fitness is potentially modifiable. The optimal way to improve fitness through pre-transplant exercise and lifestyle interventions is not known, however, and understanding how to affect through a short term intervention would also benefit other cancer and non-cancer health conditions in which future treatment is intensive and associated with significant risk.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Feasibility and Challenges of Addressing the CG or CC:

Understanding how to improve cardiorespiratory fitness in a short period of time will require a research agenda that addresses the following challenges: how to measure cardiorespiratory fitness in a generalized and scalable way, which may or may not require maximal exercise testing for all participants; how to design intensive exercise interventions that are at least partially home-based in order to minimize resource burden on patients and centers; and how to personalize intervention delivery and testing in a way that is tailored to the baseline fitness levels and capabilities of each participant. Meeting these challenges will enable large-scale, personalized exercise testing and intervention delivery in other non-transplant populations.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Thomas Shea and William Wood

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47 net votes
69 up votes
22 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Stem Cell Immunology

We now can create critical cell types like cardiomyocytes etc. from stem cells. Additionally, we are learning the rules of using these cells to rebuild tissues. A major gap in our knowledge relates to the immunobiology of these cells. Lessons from transplantation medicine are only partially applicable, because solid organs are more complex and likely more immunogenic than defined cell populations.

How does the immune... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

We now can generate large quantities of critical cell types whose deficiencies underlie many chronic diseases like heart failure. This breakthrough brings us to the next-level impediment: the immune system. While induced pluripotent stem cells have the potential to obviate rejection, in practical terms this is cost-prohibitive: It will cost huge amounts of money to produce and qualify a single patient's cell dose. Moreover, human cardiomyocytes are potent when given to infarcted hearts in the acute or sub-acute phase of infarction, but they have no benefit with chronic heart failure. The 6 months required to produce iPSC-cardiomyocytes precludes their autologous use for myocardial infarction.

We need an off the shelf cell therapy product for myocardial infarction that can be mass produced and qualified for large numbers of patients. This means an allogeneic product is necessary. Identifying the immune response to cardiomyocytes or other cell products will teach us how to precisely immunosuppress the patient, thereby minimizing complications, or alternatively, how to engineer the cells so as to avoid immunogenicity in the first place.

Lessons from the study of cardiomyocyte transplantation could extend to dopamine neurons, pancreatic beta-cells, retinal cells, myelinating cells and many other areas that cause common chronic disease.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

We know a great deal of transplant immunology from hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (graft versus host) and from solid organ transplantation (host versus graft). There are good mouse and large animal (including non-human primate) models of stem cell differentiation and organ transplantation. This offers low hanging fruit where, in perhaps 5 years, we could discern the critical similarities and differences between transplanting stem cell derivatives and organ or marrow transplantation. These studies will inform clinical trials of allogeneic human stem cell derivatives that will be underway by then.

Success in this area will require bringing together researchers interested in stem cell biology and transplant immunology. A properly resourced RFA from NIH could be just the thing needed to promote this interaction.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Charles Murry, MD, PhD

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23 net votes
45 up votes
22 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Funding of Stem Cell/Lung Regeneration Research

How to "cure" a chronic, incurable disease - A potential giant step in saving the lives of many thousands of Americans, and potentially millions worldwide, who are afflicted with COPD, the third leading cause of death in the U.S.
The financial effect of COPD in the United States alone is well over $50 billion per year. It is estimated that some 30 million Americans have COPD, which of course means that at least that... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

COPD is chronic and presently incurable. Although it sickens and disables nearly 30 million Americans, and kills 140,000 of them each year, the only "cure" is a lung transplant. Due to the scarcity of organ donors and the requirements that lungs be removed from the donor in a hospital setting, only about 1,400 lung transplants are performed in the Unites States each year. Unfortunately, transplants are fraught with complications, side effects, and potential rejections, and on the average, add only about 5 years to the life of the recipient. The best potential solution lies with the stem cell and lung regeneration research that is presently occurring at a few centers around the country. Ideally, the re-engineered lungs would be composed of the patient's own stem cells, eliminating a great many of the current transplant issues.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Research is presently in process on construction or reconstruction of human organs. There has been success in creating some of the simpler organs, such as the esophagus and bladder, and a Medical Center in Galveston has implanted re-engineered lung is a pig. As of my latest conversation with the lead Doctor on the project, results so far are promising.
There is general agreement among the researchers with whom I have communicated that we are between 5 and 20 years away from human trials of re-generated lungs using the patient's own stem cells, but more funding means more research which means more possibilities of the saving of lives.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Jim Nelson - COPD Foundation MASAC/CAC/BOARD Committee Member

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25 net votes
32 up votes
7 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

The potency and safety of transfusable red blood cells

Can we identify approaches to improve potency and/or safety of transfusable RBCs?

42 day pre-transfusion storage of RBCs maximizes utilization, while minimizing waste. However, RBCs undergo changes during collection, manipulation and storage that may reduce their potency or safety. Progress in understanding markers that predict transfusion success at the time of collection and with storage remains slow. New technologies... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

While novel RBC storage methods have been described, the mechanisms underlying their efficacy has not been defined, a step that will be important for further improvements in this area. Some of these methods appear to improve efficacy of the RBC bioenergetic pathways; however, to date there have not been notable advances in reducing cytoskeletal defects common in stored RBCs. The development of new RBC preservation methods that minimize the impact of the storage lesion on specific areas of concern (e.g., diminished oxidation/peroxidation, decreased membrane fragility) is needed.

 

Use of ex vivo generated RBCs is an alternative to conventional donor-derived RBCs which can potentially improve product consistency, reduce the storage lesion, and improve safety. However, advances are needed before this approach is feasible on a large scale. While the development of blood substitutes including blood pharming will likely require more than 3-10 years before it can be ready for the clinic, Blood Pharming from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells is now technically feasible and the recent development of genome editing methods suggests the exciting possibility of generating GMP compliant “immortal” stem cell sources to produce transfusable RBCs.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Research should include both pre-clinical and clinical studies to define optimal combinations of known factors preserving red cells (e.g. hypo-osmolarity, energy sources, antioxidants), and the development of methods for RBC pathogen reduction that do not increase the storage lesion.

Procedures for generating blood cells from cultured stem/progenitor cells is not currently cost-effective, limiting near term applications to special patient populations such as specific RBC phenotyping of rare donors for chronically transfused patients. Areas of research needed to advance the development of blood substitutes and blood pharming include: (a) new approaches to blood substitutes including artificial oxygen carriers generated from red cell lysates/components or engineered from combinatorial chemico-biological approaches (e.g., derivatization of hemoglobin, encapsidation of modulated oxygen carriers); (b) a better understanding of the biological properties of cultured RBCs with the goal of reducing blood pharming costs; (c) optimizing methods to expand stem cell populations while allowing differentiation to selected clinically relevant blood cell populations at clinically relevant levels; and (d) optimizing methodologies that faithfully replicate embryonic development to develop the cells of interest.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Nareg Roubinian, MD and Naomi Luban, MD for the NHLBI State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine

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14 net votes
31 up votes
17 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Stem cell niche in the lung

How do lung progenitors recognize stem cell niches, and what cell-cell interactions mediate normal repair?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Research on the stem cell-niche interaction will enhance our understanding of stem cell behavior, enable manipulation of stem cell activity and differentiation potential, and facilitate the development of stem cell-based therapy.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Developing novel models for in vitro 3D culture and in vivo transplantation assays will facilitate the progress.

Recent advances have identified and characterized several lung progenitor cell types. However research gaps remain on understanding the interaction of stem cells with the niche, and how the microenvironment impacts on the stem cell activity during injury/repair.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

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8 net votes
23 up votes
15 down votes
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