Showing 24 ideas for tag "translational"

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Animal Models for Translational Research and Drug Development

There is a need to identify and develop suitable animal models (e.g. larger, non-primate animal models) that faithfully predict the outcomes of new medicines and treatments in heart, lung, blood, and sleep (HLBS) disorders prior to human clinical trials.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

If animal models can faithfully predict the outcomes in human clinical trials of new medicines and treatments, it will reduce the economic burden for the failure of drug development.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Identification of current available animal models;
Development of new animal models with recent advances in mammalian genome projects and gene targeting technologies could be done over the next 5-10 years
Medical research, especially in basic discovery, has benefited significantly from the use of various animal models, such as gene-targeted and transgenic mouse models. However, many discoveries from animal models (e.g. mouse models) failed to translate into human applications.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

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92 up votes
19 down votes
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Goal 1: Promote Human Health

Transformative Impact of Proteomics

The proteomics field has dramatically progressed over the past 20 years, with advancements and improvements in experimental designs and sample preparation protocols, as well as mass spectrometry equipment, approaches, and analysis. This has resulted in substantial forward progress towards a proteomic pipeline to establish cause and effect mechanisms of cardiovascular disease. There is a need for CV proteomics that resolve... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

The necessary tools have been assembled, and managing implementation will reduce the time required for completion of larger scale projects.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

high feasibility; the challenge will be managing communication across groups to maximize impact

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Merry Lindsey

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196 net votes
234 up votes
38 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Translational research supporting stem cell therapy for cardiovascular disease

Translational research supporting stem cell therapy for cardiovascular disease, including: core laboratories for preclinical IND-enabling studies (e.g., PACT), and clinical trials networks for evaluating promising new treatments (e.g., CCTRN).

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

The most cost effective scientific procedure ever utilized to answer the risk benefit question posed by a new intervention to be used in humans is a clinical trial. Major clinical trials are their most effective when planted in controversial ground (MRFIT, CAST, ALLHAT). Like these studies, which were caught in a controversial dynamic of uncertainties and disparate sets of expectations, a clinical trial network to assess cell therapy is precisely what is needed.
Experienced researchers recognize the current inimical environment of cell therapy. Now - as before - some forces argue that new therapy offers no benefits, while other equally vehement constituents contend that the benefits of therapy are so great, and the risks so small, that the treatment requires little if any regulation and should be available at once to the US public. Each side provides thunder, but little light.
It is precisely in this contentious environment where passions argue beyond the data that clinical trials are required. Their construction of the most objective view of the strengths and weaknesses of the intervention comes at a cost, but the answers these well designed and concordantly executed studies provide is the clearest illuminations of the benefits and risks of human cell therapy.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Based on the unmet clinical needs in the treatment of cardiovascular disease and the compelling early evidence for the promise of cell therapy, NHLBI created the Cardiovascular Cell Therapy Research Network in 2007. Now in its ninth year, the Network has completed three major clinical trials in cell therapy. It has published 35 manuscripts in prestigious clinical journals including JAMA, Circ, and Circ Research. Its biorepository has published two manuscripts relating baseline phenotype findings to measures of left ventricular function. A fourth clinical trial is underway assessing the effect of cell therapy on peripheral vascular disease. The Network is also proceeding with the largest effort to assess the effect of CSC cells in patients with heart failure - the first clinical trial that will assess the effect of combined cell therapy in heart failure patients. In addition, CCTRN will study the effect of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells in patients with anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy. Each of these protocols is NHLBI and FDA approved.
CCTRN’s reputation of conducting and then promulgating the results of high quality clinical trials makes it the most effective mechanism to assess the benefits of cell therapy in cardiovascular disease. It is important to continue to fund the infrastructure already in place to ensure its continued high quality operation and its place as the cornerstone of cardiovascular clinical cell therapy research in the United States.

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149 up votes
34 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Understanding the Genetic & Epigenetic Basis of Congenital Heart Disease?

Over the last thirty years, our fundamental understanding of the genetics and pathogenesis of congenital heart disease has lagged the tremendous advances in the surgical and clinical care of infants with this group of disorders. We need to close this gap with investigation into the genetic basis of congenital heart malformations to develop new models of disease. The goall is translate an improved molecular genetic and... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common congenital malformation and the most common cause of mortality during the first year of life. Approximately 70% of cases occur sporadically without a strong family history or identifiable genetic syndrome, and the primary heritable basis of most non-syndromic CHD has yet to be identified. Studies of affected kindreds, syndromic disease, and more recently genome wide association studies (GWAS) have shed light on a handful of causal loci, while exome sequencing and studies of structural variation uncovering rare de novo variants in trios have yielded only an 8-10% rate of diagnosis in cohorts with CHD. Despite the application of contemporary techniques and study design to genetic discovery in CHD, the majority of the genetic risk for human cardiac malformations remains unexplained.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

One key challenge is that many of the stakeholders including those affected with congenital heart disease (children), along with the physicians make a diagnosis and referral (obstetricians, neonatologists, general pediatricians), are generally funded by other agencies (NICHD). Trans-agency collaboration and cooperation is necessary to improve the translational research structures necessary to improve disease.

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22 net votes
37 up votes
15 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Translational training programs

The strategic vision to enhance translation and to enhance the workforce both require training that spans the scope of basic science, pre-clinical development, clinical trials. We lack coherent mechanisms for training the next generation of translational researchers, some of whom may be MDs, and some PhDs. A program should provide cross-training of Clinical Fellows and Postdocs to reflect the needed interactions between... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

The impact will trainees with more comprehensive exposure and involvement in translation of science from the bench to bedside. MDs will spend more time in labs or involved in pre-clinical work, PhDs will become CITI certified and assist with enrollment of clinical trials and trial design. Journal clubs will span the sciences, the clinical practice and the translational realm including regulatory and industry considerations. Trainees can use this background whether they go on in medicine, science, translation, or industry to fit and contribute to an increasingly translational medical bioscience field.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Feasibility must include a academic medicine environment active in translational biomedical science such that the mentors can include scientists, physicians and physician/scientists, some of whom are translators. Some of the scientists should be from industry and perhaps projects and funding can involve industry/Pharm as well these will benefit from an educated workforce. Challenges involve individuals at the sites putting the right teams together, but many Universities are doing this with incubators and translational units at present. This will further the clinical involvement to include Fellows in Fellowship programs in Cardiology, Medicine and Surgery.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Keith Jones

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27 net votes
38 up votes
11 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Training of Clinical & Translational Scientists

Although the NCRR and NIGMS used to have a mechanism to train new generation of clinical & translational scientists, this program was stopped. Why?

What is the possibility of other institutes to come up with the priority of funding resources in this regard?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

In view of the health care models, strong control of insurance companies in determining the remuneration, lack of protective time for qualified clinicians to continue their research, no incentive to the institute for promoting such activities, lack of available tenure-track jobs, pool of effective and well-trained clinical & translational researchers is decreasing rapidly. Even though NIH invests resources to train MD-PhD students, a very minor pool of these graduates continue curiosity and passion in advancing new knowledge and discovering newer approaches.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC
  1. Additional resources must be developed by NHLBI, NIAID, NIDDK and other major institutes to support this endeavor.
  2. Institutes/medical schools who provide protective time to their faculty to continue their efforts in clinical & translational research, must be acknowledged and incentivized.
  3. There has been no effective way of measuring outcomes from such investments. All of us must take ownership in utilizing the resources more effectively and more productively.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Devendra K. Agrawal, PhD

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38 up votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Need to train and nurture more "translators"!

One of the major challenges in translating from bench-to-bedside and back is communication: the ability of basic and clinical scientists to understand each other's scientific language to be able to appreciate the importance of the other’s research questions and findings.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Having an increased number of researchers able to connect dots across the continuum of translational research should increase overall success of translation of ideas into health.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

This requires "rearranging" of already existing elements. Within 5-10 years of running specifically designed re/cross -training programs, the effects might be widely visible.
Basic scientists usually do not keep up with the latest outcomes of important clinical studies, and thus might miss important starting points for new basic research (e.g., negative trials that suggest the need for new hypotheses). The great majority of clinical scientists do not attend basic scientific sessions because are turned off by the specialized (dense/obscure) scientific terms used. Those who are interested in being translators have a hard time integrating and surviving in the "opposite camp" (i.e., at many medical schools, basic scientists are expected to bring in all their salary in a clinical department, and clinicians get little protected time for basic research)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

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22 net votes
39 up votes
17 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Establishment of an independent study section on Pulmonary Vascular Biology and Translational Research

The research on pulmonary vascular biology including smooth muscle cell biology and endothelial cell biology and related pulmonary vascular diseases such as pulmonary hypertension and related right heart failure, and endothelial dysfunction in lung vascular inflammation and acute lung injury, as well as pulmonary embolism and lung transplantation has been rapidly expanding. The field is attracting an ever increasing... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Establishment of a study section on Pulmonary Vascular Biology and Translational Research will provide adequate funding to stimulate innovative research on this rapidly expanding field and promote translational research and thereby promote human health by providing potential novel therapeutic strategies for the devastating diseases such as pulmonary hypertension and acute lung injury.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Youyang Zhao, Kurt Denmark, Asrar B. Malik, Mark Gladwin, Jahar Bhattacharya, Michael Matthay, Sharon Rounds, Jason Yuan

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23 net votes
50 up votes
27 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Incentivizing Earlier Investment in NHLBI-Funded Technologies

How might NHLBI assist its awardees to attract private sector funding or partnerships earlier in the product development process to help bridge the gap between academic discoveries and product commercialization?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Attracting private sector support earlier in the development pipeline would help fill an important funding gap between academic discoveries and product commercialization, enabling products to reach patients more quickly, and improving the return on NHLBI’s investments in basic research.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Some existing initiatives such as the SBIR Phase IIB Bridge and Small Market Awards encourage non-federal investors to invest earlier in NHLBI-funded technologies. In addition, the NCAI is designed to support critical feasibility studies and business case development to de-risk earlier investment by the private sector. These efforts are showing early signs of success, but impact only a small proportion of NHLBI-funded basic research discoveries.
Estimates for the cost of developing a new drug or device range from the hundreds of millions to billions of dollars and 10-15 years to get from the lab to the patient. The NHLBI cannot fully support that development, so private sector support is critical for biomedical technologies to be commercialized. Overall private capital investment in the life sciences is increasing, but it is not being targeted at heart, lung, blood, and sleep technologies or at the seed stage of development. Venture capital investment in heart, lung, blood, and sleep technologies has declined or remained stagnant since 2008 (http://graphics.wsj.com/venture-capital-and-the-human-body/) and seed stage investment from the private sector for early stage high-risk projects is in short supply (PWC Moneytree: https://www.pwcmoneytree.com/HistoricTrends/CustomQueryHistoricTrend).

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

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15 net votes
23 up votes
8 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

NIH should promote, rather than deter “fast-track” translational research projects

In the current environment, NIH reviewers actually deter, rather than promote, progress on proposed pre-clinical animal research that is most likely to rapidly translate into clinical breakthroughs in the short term. Scientists should be allowed to focus on critical missing information (roadblocks) needed to accelerate a promising treatment to clinical trials. For instance, at the NHLBI there is currently no study section... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Yes, large animal studies may often be desirable too. But, the comprehensive information needed can be dramatically accelerated by using small rodents (e.g. by increased “n” and shorter lifespan). Then and if necessary, more focused large animal studies can be used more judiciously before commencing human trials. If a proposed, well-designed, translational study has identified a promising new treatment and the PI seeks to collect critical information to set the stage for clinical trials, he/she should be given the chance to conduct this research instead of being directed toward many years of collecting mechanistic data for something that is ready to move toward clinical study. Later, we can prop our feet on the desk and leisurely design those mechanistic studies knowing that more people are surviving, rather than dying. Rome burns while we play!

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Can be done now by simply fast-tracking studies that may truly accelerate improvements in patient outcomes. Knowing that is works is more important than how it works from the patient standpoint.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Anthony Martin Gerdes

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9 net votes
18 up votes
9 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

The Investigator's Catch-22: How Can NHLBI Help?

The Critical Challenge is to determine how NHLBI can continue to foster the translational research necessary to allow our researchers to further develop their NHLBI-funded basic science discoveries. Researchers can't readily get a "typical" grant to perform the preclinical and early clinical translational IND-enabling research, and also can't yet attract private sector support without having done the work to "de-risk"... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Ensuring that NHLBI-funded researchers have the means to further develop promising research discoveries will ensure that NHLBI continues to fulfill its Mission. Providing funding or resources to move basic science discoveries from the lab towards the clinic can expand the research environments, opportunities, and collaborations available to NHLBI investigators and lead to potential new therapies for heart, lung, and blood diseases.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Just as research project itself can take years, if not decades, to accomplish, so too can a cultural shift in our extramural research community. While one may have a different understanding of what constitutes "translational" research depending upon his or her vantage point, in reality it is bi-directional (from bench to bedside and back to bench) and offers possibilities for a wide range of researchers. Engaging established basic scientists in translational research can open new opportunities to them, and younger researchers are likely more familiar and well-poised for new research paradigms and collaborative efforts such as those afforded by the translational development process.
Basic discovery science is appropriately the backbone of the NHLBI extramural research program. But, for any basic science discovery to have a meaningful impact on human health, it must be "translated from the bench to the bedside." These next steps in translation involve a tremendous amount of research that is not amenable to hypothesis-driven grant mechanisms like an R01 or P01. Without access to funding support for early-stage translational work, investigators can be stymied and NHLBI-funded basic science discoveries can languish.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

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10 net votes
21 up votes
11 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Incentivizing Translational Research

Support for scientific research depends on making a compelling case that we contribute to the health of Americans and the health of the US economy. This idea is to address the critical challenge of making basic research relevant to the lives of Americans by incentivizing NHBLI researchers to engage meaningfully in translational research.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

The specific proposal is to give a 5 to 10 percentile bump (similar to that given to junior investigator) to researchers whose NIH funding has led to translational outcomes that are of tangible benefit to the health of Americans and/or the US economy.

Categories that would meet the translational bump might include:

  1. A clinical trial based on their basic or clinical research;
  2. Generation of a device, drug or other therapy that has entered cllinical testing;
  3. Granting of a patent that has been licensed by a company,

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea TomT

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16 net votes
25 up votes
9 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Translation of an intervention to reduce sudden cardiac death

There is a need to identify and to develop pharmaceutical interventions for patients at risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD).

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Markedly reduce sudden cardiac death in high populations. Lead to a new pharmacologic paradigm for preventing lethal cardiac arrhythmias.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Investigators have already demonstrated in animal models of SCD that inhibition of mitochondrial Na/Ca-exchange is associated with a reduction in ventricular arrhythmias and SCD without a change in corrected-QTC.
Using a novel guinea pig model of heart failure and sudden cardiac death (SCD), researchers (Circ Res. 2014 Jun 20;115(1):44-54) have demonstrated that inhibition of the mitochondrial sodium-calcium exchanger prevents SCD. In people, SCD accounts for 170,000 to 450,000 deaths per year in the US. Basic research focused on identifying cardiac ion channel inhibitors have failed to results in antiarrhythmic drugs that prevent SCD. And although clinical research has thus far failed to identify individuals at risk of suffering a SCD in the general population, subpopulations (for example, those with a low ejection fraction months after suffering a myocardial infarction) have been identified that are at high risk. If an effective pharmaceutical intervention was developed that reduces SCD, deaths in these populations would be markedly reduced. Strategies need to be developed to translate this promising basic science finding into saving lives.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

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5 net votes
19 up votes
14 down votes
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Goal 4: Develop Workforce and Resources

Bridge “translational gap”

Provide resources and training to improve the ability of scientists to bridge the “translational gap”. Continue and expand the VITA program.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Society for Vascular Surgery

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5 net votes
7 up votes
2 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Infrastructure for human translational research

With the reduction in NCAT support for human translational research, infrastructure support will need to come from the NHLBI. This will increase the cost of most human, mechanistic based RO1 studies by 20-30%. This will exceed the current cap of $500K in many circumstances. The cap will need to be raised or NHLBI and other institutes need to determine how NIH can continue to provide this critical infrastructure.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

With the pending loss of infrastructure support by NCAT for human translational, mechanistic studies, a contiued decline in resources to support this critical resources for N of 1 studies. With appropriate support there will be increased capacity to determine which pre-clinical data is applicable to humans and to design more percise, mechanism based clinical trials to increase the likelihood of precision, personalized medicine for many of NHLBI's targeted diseases, e.g, hypertension, stroke, cardiovascular disease with diabetes and hypertension, asthma, and sleep apnea.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

The template for addressing this challenge is already available. The specific funding mechanism(s) will need to be addressed.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Gordon Williams, Gail Adler, Charles Czeisler, Ellen Seely, Lindsey Baden

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3 net votes
6 up votes
3 down votes
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