Showing 6 ideas for tag "apheresis"

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Does lowering circulating lipoprotein(a) levels influence cardiovascular outcomes?

A comprehensive research strategy and plan is needed to determine the most efficient, safe, cost-effective and widely applicable strategy to decrease circulating levels of lipoprotein(a) and to determine whether lowering circulating lipoprotein(a) levels will reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular disease such as a heart attack or a stroke as well as the progression of atherosclerosis or aortic stenosis.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

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Approximately 20% of the population are characterized by elevated circulating levels of lipoprotein(a), regardless of age, gender or blood cholesterol levels. Estimates suggest that up to 90% of the variation in plasma lipoprotein(a) levels could be due to genetic factors, which makes lipoprotein(a) the most prevalent inherited risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Large-scale genetic studies have shown that Lipoprotein(a) was the strongest genetic determinant of CVD such as atherosclerosis and aortic stenosis. Lipoprotein(a) is one of the strongest predictors of residual CVD risk and has been shown to improve CVD risk prediction in several population-based studies. Lipoprotein(a) is also one of the strongest known risk factors for spontaneous ischemic stroke in childhood.
A comprehensive research strategy aiming at identifying, evaluating interaction with other risk factors, treating and educating patients with elevated lipoprotein(a) levels would result in substantial reductions of health care costs in the US and around the globe by reducing the burden of CVD while simultaneously improving the quality of life of these patients.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

The list of pharmaceutical agents that reduce lipoprotein(a) levels is steadily increasing. There are approximately half a dozen strategies that have been shown to significantly and safely lower lipoprotein(a) levels. One of the challenges of this research strategy will be to determine which of these strategies represent the most efficient, safe, cost-effective and widely applicable approach to lower lipoprotein(a) levels and CVD outcomes.
Increasing awareness on lipoprotein(a) and CVD will also be of utmost importance for this effort as relatively few physicians perform lipoprotein(a) testing and even fewer patients are aware of their lipoprotein(a) level. The first sign of high lipoprotein(a) is often a heart attack or stroke. Our challenge will be to identify patients with high lipoprotein(a) that could be enrolled in trials of risk characterization and lipoprotein(a)-lowering.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Sandra Revill Tremulis on behalf of the Lipoprotein(a) Foundation Scientific Advisory Board

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297 up votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Apheresis Medicine in the Management of Sickle Cell Disease

Despite advances in care, patients with sickle cell disease have significant morbidity and mortality. One challenge is the optimal use of simple vs exchange transfusion vs no transfusion when managing these patients. Simple transfusions lead to iron overload while exchange transfusions may expose patients to increase numbers of red blood cell units. The mechanism of benefit from transfusion (oxygen delivery vs marrow... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

SCD is the most common genetic disease in the United States affecting 100,000 individuals or 1 in 400 African American births. Pain, stroke, acute chest syndrome and priapism are common morbidities affecting patients with sickle cell disease, which often result in emergency room visits and/or hospitalizations. Despite advances in treatment, sickle cell disease is associated with significant mortality and shortened life expectancy. Defining the optimal role of red blood cell exchange and plasma exchange (which may be used to remove plasma molecules such as inflammatory factors and free hemoglobin) in the management and prevention of the complications of sickle cell disease and may not only prolong the life of these patients but is expected to improve the quality of their lives. In addition, clearly defining the indications for simple verses exchange transfusion therapy has the potential to minimize both alloimmunization to red blood cells (reported to occur in up to 75% of patients with sickle cell disease) and iron overload associated with transfusion.

Transfusion therapy may be efficacious to sickle cell patients by providing increased oxygen delivery to tissues and/or decreasing the amount of sickle hemoglobin present by suppression of erythropoiesis. Understanding the relative contributions of these mechanisms will assist with optimal use of transfusion therapy as well as inform the development of novel alternative therapies

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Multi-center trials should be feasible, given the number of patients with sickle cell disease in the US. Participation by larger academic centers which care for sickle cell patients should facilitate trials. Methods for automated red cell exchange and plasma exchange are available and in common use at many centers. Great interest exists among physicians caring for sickle cell patients (as exemplified by the recent NIH consensus document and ASFA sickle cell consensus conference) which is a strength of this proposal. Challenges include agreement on standard treatment protocols across centers and long term follow up of patients. Maintaining vascular access in sickle cell patients is another challenge when performing apheresis procedures on sickle cell patients

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Bruce Sachais on behalf of ASFA

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130 net votes
152 up votes
22 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Lipid apheresis as adjunct therapy in peripheral vascular disease

What is the roll of inflammation and how does lipid apheresis alter inflammation in peripheral vascular disease when added to standard therapy and/or when used alone? Does lipid apheresis result in long-term improvement with reduced morbidity, mortality, and expense compared to standard therapy?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

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The prevalence of peripheral vascular disease (PVD) in the United States is estimated to be 5.9%, affecting up to 20% of adults over the age of 65. Therapy for PVD is vascular surgical intervention for limb ischemia; combined with medical therapy and anti-platelet agents but morbidity and mortality remains high. Low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) is associated with increased risk for development and progression of PVD. Preliminary studies of the use of lipid apheresis have demonstrated improvement in symptoms and a variety of laboratory measures with decreased morbidity when added to standard therapy. The mechanism of this treatment may go beyond reducing LDL-c as the columns also affect levels of inflammatory cytokines, alter blood rheology, and affect other lipids.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Currently two lipid apheresis devices have been cleared by the Food and Drug Administration and are in use in the United States. The presence of cleared devices, the large number of affected patients, and availability of testing for lipoproteins, fibrinogen, CRP, PAI-1, IL-6, IL-17, IL-1, IL-10, INF-γ, VEGF, PGI2, IGF-I and rheology factors make the enrollment and evaluation of patients into a clinical trial examining the use of this treatment of PVD feasible. Challenges for the performance of a clinical trial would include the limited number of centers offering lipid apheresis, the chronic nature and length of time needed to perform lipid apheresis, and the expense of the lipid apheresis devices and disposables.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Bruce Sachais on behalf of ASFA

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116 up votes
20 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

The role of Extracorporeal Photopheresis (ECP) in the prophylaxis and treatment of acute & chronic Graft Versus Host Disease

In Acute Graft Versus Host Disease (aGVHD), we would like to examine whether early and intensified delivery of ECP as part of standard prophylaxis will decrease overall corticosteroid exposure while preserving expected relapse rates in patients undergoing unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).
Chronic GVHD (cGVHD) is common after HSCT (30-50% recipients) and is a major contributor to late transplant-related... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

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Patients who develop aGVHD undergo toxic therapy with high-dose corticosteroids, often for long durations, resulting in high morbidity and treatment related mortality. Alternatively, T cell depletion of the donor graft to reduce GVHD is associated with high rates of infection and relapse of the disease that led to the HSCT. Targeting other pathways of GVHD pathogenesis may preserve the beneficial immune reconstitution and graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects, while ameliorating the severity of GVHD. One such pathway involves regulatory T cells (T regs), which inhibit T cell alloreactivity, and are correlated with the incidence and severity of GVHD without loss of GVT. To date, there is no consensus on a standard second-line therapy for aGVHD, and current approaches focus mainly on intensification of immunosuppression. Addressing this compelling question will help to decrease overall corticosteroid exposure while preserving the expected relapse rates in patients undergoing unrelated donor HSCT.

Appropriate initial therapy for cGVHD involves high doses & prolonged use (yrs) of corticosteroids, while patients still develop irreversible sclerotic manifestations of disease. Early intervention prior to disease onset may help prevent cGVHD development or lessen its severity, requiring less corticosteroid exposure. Addressing the compelling question for cGVHD will help decrease exposure to drugs with associated morbidity, while preserving expected relapse rates in these patients.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Feasibility:

  • GVHD has relatively high incidence after HSCT and at the same time there is a lack of consensus on standard second line therapy for the disease. Thus, there will be increased interest in developing and participation in those studies.

** ECP is generally well tolerated and complications are infrequent.

*** There is a great potential for multi-discipline collaboration approach in this patients’ population.

*** There is an opportunity to engage industry partners in the design and support for these studies.

**** There are numerous scientific opportunities for meritorious science as there have been limited systematic studies of ECP mechanisms of as well as standardization of apheresis protocols based on GVHD disease state.

 

 

Challenges:

  • Limited number of institutions providing ECP treatment.

** Cost of the procedures (although Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services now covers ECP for cGVHD).

*** There is a very limited number of animal models available for apheresis research in general, and studies of the mechanism(s) of action of photopheresis have been very limited as well as difficult and expensive to perform. However understanding pathological mechanisms and its relationship to response to apheresis is critical for optimization and advancement of patient care.

****Lack of infra-structure for apheresis research.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Joseph Schwartz on behalf of ASFA

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103 net votes
126 up votes
23 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Study on key product factors for optimal Bone Marrow Transplantation (BMT) graft function

Hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) collected by Apheresis is the most common source used for BMT. How the cells are collected and what kinds of cells are collected can affect BMT graft function. Limited studies have been done to study the key product factors in relationship to optimal graft function.
Questions remain such as the optimal lymphocytes contents for reduced infection post BMT, optimal megakaryocyte precursor... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

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Optimal cell therapy products can lead to reduced post BMT complication and reduced morbidity and mortality.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

In vitro, animal studies, clinical samples can be used for key product factors for optimal BMT graft function.
These can be achieved if funding is available, as there are many centers perform allo and auto BMT.
Funding support is critically needed in this area.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Yanyun Wu on behalf of ASFA

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70 net votes
93 up votes
23 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

The Use of Therapeutic Apheresis to Reduce Circulating Levels of Galectin-3 and other Cancer and Inflammation Promoting Factors

Inflammation plays roles in cancer initiation, promotion, and progression. Elevated circulating galectin-3 (Gal-3) protein and other cancer and inflammation promoting factors (CIPFs) such as C-reactive protein and VEGF are associated with tumorigenesis and may play causative roles. Plasma Gal-3 is a biomarker, prognosticator, and pathogenic mediator of diverse cancers and is emerging as a therapeutic target. Preliminary... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Apheresis therapy in a clinical setting, both alone and in combination with conventional protocols, shows great potential to enhance treatment regimens, reduce dosage and side effects, improve drug deliver to target tissues, reduce long term treatment related morbidity and improve outcomes with significant benefits for patients with a broad range of cancer types and stages.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

The need for well designed, randomized clinical trials would be readily feasible with the appropriate IND. Grant support will be needed for further development of this concept, as well as to develop columns with more optimized and specific capabilities, in addition to clinical trials demonstrating efficacy.

Apheresis is highly underutilized and underfunded in the US, while Apheresis research and development is much more advanced and widely utilized in Europe and Asia.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Isaac Eliaz, MD

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40 up votes
7 down votes
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