Showing 6 ideas for tag "death"

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Neurocardiology – A Challenge for Prevention of CV Disease

There is a need to recognize and study the interdependencies between the brain/peripheral nervous system and the heart/vascular systems in health and disease to develop interventions to detect, treat, and prevent cardiovascular disease.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

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Effective new therapies for treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease

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long recognition of interactions between neural and CV system provide a wealth of background knowledge, while new imaging and electronic designs provide means for administering novel interventions.
Presently it is recognized that the autonomic nervous system plays a major role in the pathophysiology of arrhythmias leading to sudden cardiac death (SCD), and NHLBI supports ongoing studies to determine if modulation of nerves may provide an effective means to reduce the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias associated with SCD. Already, investigators have suggested that therapies such as right, left, or bilateral cerviocothoracic sympathectomy may provide a novel and cost effective intervention for the prevention of SCD. It is also well known that the sympathetic nervous system is activated during the onset and progression of heart failure. Currently investigators have proposed studies of specific central brain sites and the nerve supply to the heart during chronic heart failure progression to gain a better understanding of this pathway as a therapeutic target for the treatment of HF. This and the translation of results from similar studies is a challenge that should be encouraged.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

RCT of stepped-care depression treatment on CV events & death

Does treating depression improve survival and reduce major adverse cardiac events in acute coronary syndrome patients?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

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A substantial evidence base now exists showing that depression is associated with a two-fold increased risk of death and recurrent CV events in cardiac patients, leading to a recent AHA scientific statement recommending its elevation to the status of a risk factor for adverse medical outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndrome (Lichtman et al., 2014). Yet there is currently no clinical trial evidence that reducing depression improves cardiac morbidity and mortality. A clinical trial, using new, more effective depression treatment methods, such as collaborative care approaches that combine psychological counseling with medication in stepped-care fashion, is needed to determine whether effective treatment of depression can improve survival and reduce clinical cardiovascular events in cardiac patients.

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Newer stepped-care treatments for depression, combining medication and psychotherapy, have recently been developed and found to more effectively reduce depression than earlier treatments. By using these newer treatment methods to substantially lower depression, we can better answer the question as to whether treating the newly acknowledged risk factor of depression in ACS patients can improve clinical outcomes in these patients.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Problem of sudden cardiac death

Among major causes of cardiac mortality cardiac arrest stands as a cause of death that rivals all other causes in terms of frequency. There has been at best only modest improvement in resuscitation over recent years. No wonder with so little NHLBI funding going into this cause compared to acute MI and heart failure. Hopefully the IOM report on cardiac resuscition will be a call to action that will highlight these NIHBI... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Fish Oil or Snake Oil: Is There Antiarrhythmic Benefit?

Does fish oil supplement intervention truly reduce arrhythmia burden in the general population?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

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Low-cost effect preventative antiarrhythmic therapy

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Low cost wearable, internet-connected devices make it possible to inexpensively collect heart rate and physiometric data from a large number of people to determine and predict arrhythmia risk.
Observational studies have suggested that either cardiac arrest or sudden death is associated with low dietary intake and blood levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and that a fish diet or dietary supplementation with polyunsaturated fatty acids (the GISSI-Prevenzione study) decrease mortality and/or sudden death following myocardial infarction. However, NHLBI-supported and other randomized, double blind studies of the antiarrhythmic efficacy of fish oil supplements in patients with a high arrhythmic risk and implantable cardioverter defibrillators have failed to demonstrate benefit. Similarly, fish oil supplements in patients at risk for atrial fibrillation (AF) have shown no benefit. Yet evidence from studies in laboratory animals continue to suggest that omega-3 fatty acids present in fish oil provide benefits that should be antiarrhythmic. These and other fundamental research studies in isolated tissues and laboratory animals continue to lead to uncertainty as to whether patients with cardiac arrhythmias may benefit from fish oil supplements.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

What are the Determinants of Short Term Prediction of Heart Attacks?

In spite of many years of research, we still cannot predict the short term risk of a heart attack or sudden CHD death. Most CHD deaths occur outside of the hospital. In spite of improvement of out-of-hospital emergency care, most “sudden death events” are still not successfully resuscitated.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

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There is strong evidence of interrelationship between inflammation, thrombogenesis, especially activation of tissue factor and platelets, and risk of a heart attack or sudden death. This is especially true in individuals who have pneumonia, influenza, etc. but also perhaps in relationship to environmental factors such as air pollution. Development of early identification and treatment approaches could substantially reduce CHD mortality.

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The NHLBI has certainly had a major commitment in studying the interrelationship between inflammation and CHD. However, there is a need to go into the field and evaluation the interrelationship between inflammation, especially infection, drug therapies and short term acute precipitation of heart attacks. For example, there is suggestive evidence that older individuals on aspirin who have pneumonia may have reduced risk of a heart attack and sudden CHD death. Further studies linking work at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Heart and Lung Institute should attempt to further understand the interrelationships between infection, inflammation, and activation of tissue factor and platelets, and risk of thrombosis and heart attack and whether specific drug therapies, especially in high risk older individuals or even among individuals who have had previous CVD or high atherosclerotic burden, whether newer drugs could substantially reduce the risk of a heart attack.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Lewis H. Kuller, MD, DrPH

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Genetic risk factors for sudden cardiac death

What are the genetic risk factors for sudden cardiac death and failure to respond to CPR and defibrillation?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea AHA Staff & Volunteers

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