Showing 4 ideas for tag "funding"
(@gregory.morley) kudos icon +

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Maintaining R01 Funding

Independent R01 are the lifeblood for biomedical research in this country. Reducing funding through this mechanism threatens the long term security of the research community and will cause young talented scientists to choose other careers. When funding is limited NIH should employ any measures available to maintain R01 a reasonable level of funding. This could be done by reducing indirect costs, large institutional awards... more »

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89 net votes
108 up votes
19 down votes
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(@abrams) kudos icon +

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Funding for Hemostasis & Thrombosis Research

Thrombotic disorders, a result of the inappropriate activation of the hemostatic system, remain major causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Cancer, cardiovascular disease, trauma, and many of the other causes of death in the U.S. frequently culminate in a fatal thrombotic event. Notably, thromboembolic disease affects 500,000 people annually and leads to 100,000 deaths in the United States alone. Current... more »

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128 net votes
136 up votes
8 down votes
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(@stephen.fortmann) kudos icon +

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Lack of Collaboration Across NIH Institutes

There are many significant questions in CVD prevention that cross the disciplines represented by the different institutes. For example, the obesity epidemic, poor nutrition, and physical inactivity are relevant to CVD, neurological disease, diabetes, and cancer. Tobacco use is directly relevant to cancer and CVD. Social determinants and disparities affect multiple diseases and outcomes. Reducing obesity will require interventions... more »

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6 net votes
7 up votes
1 down votes
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(@stephen.fortmann) kudos icon +

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Funding Limitations Block Intervention Research

The cap on R01 research grants at $500,000 per year has not changed in over 20 years. In the current fiscal crisis for research it has become an immovable block to submitting intervention studies (randomized clinical trials on treatment). Routine advice from NIH staff is to not even try for a larger study. The cap applies to every year, so one can design a trial that costs less than $2.5 million but exceeds $500,000 in... more »

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3 net votes
6 up votes
3 down votes
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