Showing 7 ideas for tag "hematology"

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Predictors of Sickle Cell Disease Severity

Can better predictors of disease severity such as specific biomarkers and/or genetic polymorphisms be identified so as to help understand the course and progression of sickle cell disease in various patients?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

The high clinical variability in sickle cell disease (SCD) and the lack of sufficient data to help understand and or predict the course of an individual’s disease warrants the identification of better predictors of disease severity. The identification of predictors of disease severity, such as biomarkers, will be vital in the management and treatment of SCD, especially since more recently several plasma biomarkers and certain genetic polymorphisms have been proposed to influence specific clinical outcomes, including stroke, sickle cell nephropathy, and survival. Furthermore, studies of biomarkers or genetic markers in the context of clinical drug trials may be helpful in predicting response rates, thus allowing for more personalized therapeutic decisions.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Alice Kuaban on behalf of the American Society of Hematology (ASH)

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58 net votes
76 up votes
18 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Optimization of Existing Therapies for Sickle Cell Disease

How can the safety, dosing and benefits of existing therapies for sickle cell disease such as hydroxyurea, be optimized in order to increase its efficacy and improve patient adherence?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Hydroxyurea is a widely available disease-modifying therapy for sickle cell disease (SCD), but its effectiveness is currently limited by inadequate utilization, and less than optimal response. Research is needed to improve adherence to this evidence-based therapy and emphasis needs to be placed on determining whether therapy with hydroxyurea can prevent or even reverse organ dysfunction. In addition, research identifying new adjunct therapies to blood transfusion and hydroxyurea, as well as disease-specific therapies for co-morbidities such as kidney disease, hypertension, obstructive lung disease, and pulmonary hypertension will be valuable in the management and treatment of SCD.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Alice Kuaban on behalf of the American Society of Hematology (ASH)

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54 net votes
74 up votes
20 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Immunologic Treatment of Hematologic Malignancies

How can the effectiveness of existing curative therapies be improved for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Much remains to be understood about immunotherapies in order to facilitate their broad use in the treatment of hematologic disorders. While studies to date have demonstrated significant potential applications, longer-term studies are necessary to further improve the profile of these therapies, including enhancing their overall efficacy while reducing associated toxicities. The efficacy of existing curative therapies can be enhanced by evaluating the mechanisms involved in producing cytokine release syndrome; a condition which has been observed in several patients receiving this therapy. Furthermore, a careful grading scheme to predict toxicity so as to guide the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies is also required. Target identification is another important issue to advance the field. While targeting CD19 appears to be promising, it results in loss of B-cell immunity and requires prolonged immunoglobulin replacement therapies and/or allo-transplantation and new immunologic targets need to be identified in both B cell and T cell malignancies as was as acute and chronic myeloid leukemias. Minimizing the off-tumor target-mediated toxicity of both CAR T-cell and checkpoint blockade therapies would help optimize their utility.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Alice Kuaban on behalf of the American Society of Hematology (ASH)

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43 net votes
63 up votes
20 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Stem Cell Biology

There is a need to develop an artificial and functional hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche that allows for the expansion of repopulating HSCs.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Methods to expand hematopoietic stem cells have continued to be examined extensively because stem cell numbers in the graft are important for clinical outcomes following transplantation. These numbers are particularly relevant in umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation, where low numbers of stem cells are directly related to delayed hematopoietic and immune reconstitution. Improved HSC expansion strategies may significantly impact transplantation outcome, enabling broader applications beyond UCB transplantation. Furthermore, these strategies are also needed to realize the full therapeutic potential of genome editing technologies to correct hematopoietic stem cells derived from patients with hematologic disorders. Since efforts to expand HSCs in cytokine-supported liquid cultures have been largely unsuccessful, efficient expansion will require an appropriate context that is provided by the hematopoietic stem cell niche. Future studies must also evaluate how niche signals regulate stem cell function to optimize cell expansion, and proper humanized mouse models must be developed to help predict stem cell function and regulation by the niche.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Alice Kuaban on behalf of the American Society of Hematology (ASH)

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28 net votes
46 up votes
18 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Enhanced Pain Research in Sickle Cell Disease

There is a need for more enhanced pain research in order to help improve sickle cell disease patient outcomes and quality of life.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Pain is the most common clinical manifestation of sickle cell disease (SCD) and accounts for a large proportion of emergency department visits and hospitalizations. Due to its impact on the patients’ quality of life, there is a need for more basic and clinical research studies focused on understanding the mechanisms of different pain syndromes as well as the role of neurotransmitters and inflammation in acute and chronic SCD pain. Also, comparative effectiveness studies in the management of chronic pain will be crucial in helping to improve the patients’ overall quality of life.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Alice Kuaban on behalf of the American Society of Hematology (ASH)

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39 net votes
58 up votes
19 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Immunologic Treatment of Hematologic Malignancies

How can the use of CAR T-cell and checkpoint blockade strategies be optimized in order to cure hematologic diseases?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

As the body of evidence continues to grow on the potential applications for advanced immunotherapies, next-generation research must focus on addressing the possible curative effects that checkpoint blockades or adoptive CAR T-cell strategies can have for blood diseases including hematologic cancers. This will require specific research programs to fully understand the optimal role for these therapies within the continuum of care. To optimize these strategies for treatment of hematologic diseases, studies are needed to decipher specific hematologic diseases and circumstances under which these checkpoint blockers and CAR T-cell therapies may be employed as frontline approaches. Furthermore, while the optimal approach for these therapies is unclear, advanced studies are needed to elucidate the potential benefit in combining these promising approaches and whether patients can be better identified a priori for these therapies.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Alice Kuaban on behalf of the American Society of Hematology (ASH)

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13 net votes
28 up votes
15 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Venous Thromboembolism

There is a great need for the development and evaluation of biomarkers for the study of venous thromboembolism (VTE) pathophysiology and risk assessment.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Recent efforts to evaluate biomarkers for VTE occurrence and recurrence have led to the identification of multiple potential candidates, including P-selectin, E-selectin, D-dimer, various microparticles, and various inflammatory cytokines. However, no specific biomarker has yet emerged for routine clinical use for individual VTE risk stratification and personal targeted therapeutics. The development of improved animal models will advance the study of VTE pathophysiology, allowing for more accurate evaluation of emerging biomarkers and initial assessments of potential advanced therapeutic interventions. Also, the identification and prioritization of novel VTE biomarkers will be needed to help improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying VTE, so as to shepherd the development of novel mechanisms of therapy beyond anticoagulation.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Alice Kuaban on behalf of the American Society of Hematology (ASH)

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13 net votes
26 up votes
13 down votes
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