Showing 19 ideas for tag "prevention"

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Can Psychological Science Improve Weight Loss?

Will sensitivity to the psychological aspects of obesity, including lifestyle priorities and motivations, improve the efficacy of long-term effectiveness of weight loss and obesity prevention interventions?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

A primary focus on principles of psychology may result in significantly improved control of the obesity epidemic. Effective interventions could reduce the risk of diabetes, sleep apnea, and hypertension. This research could also affect clinical practice guidelines for weight loss and obesity treatment.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Psychological science has been successful in developing effective treatments for a number of conditions, including sleep disorders, depressive symptoms, anxiety and phobias. Many of the behavioral principles employed in such interventions (e.g., cognitive restructuring, motivational methods) could be translated for the prevention and treatment of obesity within a reasonable time frame. Additional attention should be directed to the needs of population subgroups in which obesity is most prevalent.
In their Viewpoint article on weight loss intervention research, Pagoto and Appelhans (JAMA, 2013, see attachment) question whether a continued focus on dietary factors in research on weight loss and obesity is warranted. Their commentary raises the importance of attention to the individual psychological characteristics that influence adherence to weight loss interventions rather than dietary composition.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

Voting

51 net votes
104 up votes
53 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Impact of intrauterine environment on obesity

How does maternal obesity before or during pregnancy affect the intrauterine environment and increase the risk of overweight/obesity in the offspring?

How does maternal dietary intake during pregnancy impact weight in the offspring?

What types of interventions are most effective for preventing excessive gestational weight gain among high risk groups?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Developing effective interventions during pregnancy can help reduce the risk of obesity in the offspring and mother.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Addressing how the intrauterine environment impacts obesity is feasible because there is already existing preliminary data that shows pregnancy can have an impact on obesity in offspring. More work needs to be done to better understand the mechanism and how best to intervene.
There is emerging evidence that the intrauterine environment can have an impact on obesity.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

Voting

33 net votes
66 up votes
33 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Understanding COPD Manifestations in Subjects without Overt Airflow Obstruction

What is the pathogenesis and appropriate treatment for subjects with chronic respiratory symptoms or imaging abnormalities who do not have overt airflow obstruction (and thus are not currently categorized as having COPD)?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

COPD is currently diagnosed by spirometry, but many other individuals (primarily smokers) have respiratory symptoms and/or imaging abnormalities that suggest lung damage. Identifying subjects with pre-obstruction manifestations of COPD could lead to more effective treatment and prevention.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

COPD subjects often develop ongoing inflammation that persists long after smoking cessation. It is unknown when this cycle of inflammation begins or what causes it.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Ed Silverman, James Crapo and the COPDGene Executive Committee

Voting

32 net votes
47 up votes
15 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

A Program of Research in the Prevention of Chronic Heart Failure

There is a need to address chronic heart failure (HF) through improved identification of patients at risk for HF and of patients with pathological ventricular remodeling who have minimal evidence of clinical HF, and more focused and individualized pharmacologic and lifestyle treatments and monitoring of patients with HF risk. Approaches would include big data collection, omics, statistical modeling, and focused clinical... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Substantially reduce the age-adjusted incidence and population burden of chronic heart failure.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

The big data and omics revolutions have made it feasible to collect and analyze a variety of data in large numbers of persons within a relatively short time. A very large sample size provides excellent statistical power. Also, the public health and economic magnitude of the problem create the urgency needed to address the critical challenge expeditiously.
Chronic heart failure (HF) is easily the most common and growing cardiovascular cause of hospitalization and impaired functional status and quality of life in the U.S. and much of the world. This is the case despite improved pharmacologic and lifestyle treatment of HF, as well as improved control of blood pressure in the general population. While some HF in the very elderly may reflect the aging process, the epidemiology suggests that most incident cases could be prevented or postponed for years. Also, there are major ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in the incidence of HF.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

Voting

17 net votes
28 up votes
11 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

What causes the structural abnormalities that cause sleep apnea, and how can they be prevented?

It is estimated that up to 28% of the population suffer from sleep apnea, which impairs functioning and reduces quality of life, while increasing risk of accidents and a variety of cardiovascular, metabolic, and neuropsychiatric diseases. A large portion of sleep apnea cases are caused by abnormal oro-nasal-maxillo-mandibular features that result in crowding of the upper airway, making it vulnerable to collapsing or... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common condition, which causes chronic fatigue and daytime sleepiness, as well as cognitive impairments affecting learning, concentration, and memory. Over the long term, it increases many health risks, including accidents, cardiovascular disease, and depression. OSA is characterized by partial, or complete, blockage of the airway during sleep, so that breathing repeatedly pauses or airflow is limited, causing repeated arousals from sleep. It is usually secondary to a narrow, or collapsible, airway due to either 1) obesity or overweight, or 2) abnormal morphology of the mandible or maxilla bones, which crowds facial structures, such as the tongue and nose, narrowing the pharynx. The causes of obesity are already being well studied, but there is relatively little research on the etiology of the structural abnormalities involved in OSA. Abnormalities of facial structure are widespread in the population causing, not only OSA, but also orthodontic problems that require many to get braces or have wisdom teeth extracted, and widespread temporomandibular joint (TMJ) problems. However, multiple studies have documented that these abnormalities are almost completely absent from populations living a preindustrial, agrarian or forager, lifestyle, making them a “disease of civilization”. In particular, the abnormalities are associated with consumption of a modern diet of processed foods during prenatal, infant, and early childhood development.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Current evidence implicates three factors in the development of these structural abnormalities: prenatal maternal nutrition (especially vitamin K2 status), breastfeeding vs. bottle-feeding, and frequency of consumption of tough foods after weaning (which provides exercise to the jaw). We need to form a large cohort and study orthodontic development prospectively from fetal development through mid-childhood, with data on diet, feeding practices, and physiological measures of nutrient status. Measurement methods are available using existing technologies to collect the necessary data on each of these measures. Determining the causes responsible for these structural abnormalities will enable further research to demonstrate effective methods of preventing them. Given that many patients with OSA are rendered so miserable by it that they undergo maxillomandibular advancement surgery to correct it, an expensive procedure with a lengthy recovery period, prevention would be a far better solution. This research will move us a big step closer to a future without sleep apnea and its formidable collection of negative effects on health and functioning.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Bonnie Dixon

Voting

6 net votes
44 up votes
38 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Liberal versus restrictive plasma prior to invasive procedures

At what INR threshold does prophylactic plasma transfusion, in non-bleeding critically ill patients who are planned to undergo an invasive procedure, prevent bleeding complications and improve patient outcomes?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Millions of plasma units continue to be transfused to non-bleeding critically ill patients. This practice persists despite the lack of high quality evidence indicating improved patient outcomes with prophylactic plasma transfusion triggered by the INR. Studies testing restrictive versus liberal transfusion triggers are now well-established in academic medicine for Red Blood Cell products. More recently, multicenter clinical trials of prophylactic platelet transfusion vs no-prophylaxis have been conducted as well. However, there remains substantial equipoise on the topic of prophylactic plasma transfusion. A large definitive clinical trial that aims to identify the INR threshold at which prophylactic plasma transfusion prevents bleeding complications in non-bleeding critically ill patients would impact clinical practice in a very meaningful way.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Abnormal coagulation tests are common in the ICU and plasma is frequently administered in this specific clinical setting. Indeed, more plasma is administered in the ICU environment than in any other clinical area. Therefore, a multi-center clinical trial addressing the knowledge gap identified above would be feasible with NHLBI support.

Importantly, healthcare providers become increasingly uncomfortable with the avoidance of coagulation factor replacement as coagulation screening test results drift further from the normal range. To address this concern, an adaptive clinical trial may be desirable. In this design, a targeted cohort with modest elevations in the INR measurement would be screened for enrollment (e.g. INR results ranging from 1.5 - 2.0). If the avoidance of plasma transfusion is noted to be safe, the study would advance to the next stage of recruitment, targeting a higher range of INR values (e.g. 2.0 - 2.5).

Finally, the value of the INR in predicting bleeding complications is increasingly scrutinized. Therefore, it can be argued that the INR is not the ideal "trigger" for plasma transfusion. Despite this, it must be acknowledged that the INR remains the primary driver of decisions related to plasma transfusion. Therefore, a large definitive trial specifically detailing the the efficacy of the current practice versus a more conservative approach to prophylactic plasma transfusion would be practice changing and potentially very transformative.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Daryl J. Kor, MD and Walter H. Dzik, MD for the 2015 NHLBI State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine

Voting

19 net votes
39 up votes
20 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

A Program of Research in the Prevention of Chronic Heart Failure

There is a need to improve identification and surveillance of persons at risk for heart failure and pathological ventricular remodeling prior to development of clinically overt heart failure.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Substantially reduce the age-adjusted incidence and population burden of chronic heart failure.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

The big data and omics revolutions have made it feasible to collect and analyze a variety of data in large numbers of persons within a relatively short time. A very large sample size provides excellent statistical power. Also, the public health and economic magnitude of the problem create the urgency needed to address the critical challenge expeditiously.
Chronic heart failure (HF) is easily the most common and growing cardiovascular cause of hospitalization and impaired functional status and quality of life in the U.S. and much of the world. This is the case despite improved pharmacologic and lifestyle treatment of HF, as well as improved control of blood pressure in the general population. While some HF in the very elderly may reflect the aging process, the epidemiology suggests that most incident cases could be prevented or postponed for years. Also, there are major ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in the incidence of HF.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

Voting

14 net votes
28 up votes
14 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

The missing ingredient in diet and cardiovascular disease prevention research

Determining the dietary patterns and dietary constituents that are most effective in preventing cardiovascular disease events. In addition to the obvious challenge of limited resources, the challenge is overcoming the tension between desire for comparable data produced from low-cost tools and need for higher quality data. Many studies continue using low-cost self-reported diet assessment instruments that produce data... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Addressing the challenge of a dietary assessment method that harnesses recent technological advances in novel biomarker assessments and in metabolomics and microbiome research with best practices in self-reported assessment instruments would enable a giant leap forward in nutrition and cardiovascular disease prevention research. Self-reported instruments require repeated measurements which are expensive or are instruments hampered by measurement error that attenuates estimates of the diet-disease association. Progress on this critical challenge would enable research questions to be addressed using more accurate methods, including questions that ask about best overall diet pattern to prevent cardiovascular disease as well as questions targeted to specific nutrients or diet constituents. Overcoming this obstacle would enable research to move forward in population science research where knowledge of the diet of free-living individuals or community populations is needed as well as among patients in clinical research (other than expensive feeding trials where exact diet is known). There is great potential in stored specimens from epidemiology cohorts and clinical trials to be used with new biomarker assessments to associate earlier diet with hard outcomes accrued in these studies.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Advances in microbiome research and metabolomics technologies illustrate that progress in the field of biomarker assessments of dietary status is not only feasible but may sharpen our understanding of the relationship of dietary constituents with HLB disease pathologies. In the field of energy balance measurement there are calls for movement away from self-reported diet measures and for researchers and sponsors to focus development on objective measures (http://www.nature.com/ijo/journal/vaop/naam/abs/ijo2014199a.html ). Leadership from NHLBI in this area can move the field forward in validating tools and making them more cost effective.
“You are what you eat” is a familiar aphorism, but research progress on what dietary patterns and dietary constituents are most effective in preventing cardiovascular disease events is impeded by inadequate dietary assessment tools. This critical challenge calls for a major effort, in collaboration with other ICs, to develop methods and innovations in measures using blood, urine, feces, saliva, or other bodily fluids or tissues. These tools eventually need to be cost effective, valid, and reproducible.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

Voting

14 net votes
31 up votes
17 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Restoring Balance to Stroke Prevention in Older AFib Patients

Improving Tools for Anticoagulation Decision-Making

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

AFib increases stroke risk by five-fold and doubles the risk that a stroke will result in permanent disability. While oral anticoagulation (OAC) is highly effective at reducing stroke risk, elderly patients are often under-anticoagulated. This is in part due to an under-appreciation of the stroke risk associated with AFib and the tendency of some health care professionals to prioritize perceived bleeding risk over stroke prophylaxis. Because current bleeding risk assessment tools are imperfect and largely unable to predict patients who are likely to have bleeding complications, they are often not utilized—or if used, do not truly predict which patients are at risk of a bleed. An improved bleeding risk tool is critical to improved risk assessment in the elderly. That bleeding risk tool should then be combined with the stroke risk tool for single risk stratification to streamline anticoagulation decision-making.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Developing effective integrated risk assessment tools is feasible only if there is consensus on the validity of the clinical information being provided. The approach to this critical challenge is two-fold. First, needed research that improves the reliability of bleeding risk assessment in the elderly should be pursued. Second, stroke and bleeding risk tools should be combined into a single risk stratification tool. This will require significant investment and focus, but the resulting bleeding risk assessment combined with the accepted CHA2DS2-VASc score, would significantly impact the 40 - 60% of patients who are currently not on an anticoagulant and are at increased risk of stroke and death.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea AFib Optimal Treatment Task Force

Voting

11 net votes
19 up votes
8 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Prevent the Development of COPD

What can be done to prevent the development of COPD in individuals at increased risk. Quitting smoking before the development of COPD can prevent COPD development. What can be done to prevent COPD for individuals with other identified ris factors

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Several risk factors have been identified that identify individuals at risk for developing COPD including low birth weight, poor maximally attained lung function and the presence of asthma. Strategies to prevent COPD development in these individuals are needed.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

The Lung Health Study demonstrated that smoking cessation prevents COPD progression. Studies of similar size and duration should be organized to address other risk factors.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea COPD Foundation, COPDF MASAC

Voting

15 net votes
18 up votes
3 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Diet and prevention of cardiovascular events

In the US, what kind of diet(s) is/are best for preventing hard cardiovascular events?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Provide an evidence base for public policy on diet.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

The Spaniards have shown that this kind of trial is possible. We have tools and interest in place for pragmatic trials.

The PREDIMED trial (done in Spain) randomized ~7000 adults and found that a diet supplemented with olive oil or nuts reduced cardiovascular events compared to a "low-fat" diet. However, in Spain the Mediterranean diet is arguably the norm.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

Voting

8 net votes
20 up votes
12 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Addressing the population-level determinants of CVD

Atherosclerotic CVD is an epidemic disease that is determined primarily by the social and physical environments acting in part through risk factor distributions. To date most preventive efforts have been in the clinical setting, using medications for risk factors. As useful as this is, a much better solution is to deal with the behavioral contributors to risk and their social determinants, including strong destructive... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Atherosclerotic disease is largely preventable through behavior: physical activity, nutrition, absence of tobacco use. Achieving ideal risk factor levels would virtually eliminate ischemic CVD, even in genetically-susceptible individuals. The decline in CVD mortality has been in large part due to declines in risk factor levels. The current epidemic of obesity threatens to reverse these gains. It is a critical challenge to develop ways to counter the negative social and economic forces that prevent improvements in risk behaviors

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

The short-term nature of NHLBI research has limited its ability to address this overwhelming part of the CVD problem. This is the challenge. NHLBI needs new mechanisms and perhaps partnerships to discover ways to address these population-level issues. Research on how to build community coalitions to address public health policy and educational approaches to CVD prevention will require new funding mechanisms perhaps analogous to funding individual investigators rather than individual grants.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Stephen P. Fortmann

Voting

7 net votes
22 up votes
15 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Cardiovascular risk and adverse event prediction & estimating net benefit in statin-treated individuals

Compelling Question: There is insufficient data to personalize the use of nonstatin or other preventive therapies in statin-treated patients. Equations could then be developed to predict CVD risk and to predict the risk of adverse events in statin-treated patients to guide intensification of therapy.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

The 2013 ACC/AHA cholesterol guideline recommends statin therapy for the prevention of CVD events in moderate-high risk individuals. Many patients are still at increased CVD risk on statin therapy.

The potential for net benefit from CVD risk reduction therapies added to statin therapy depends on the absolute CVD risk in the statin-treated patient, the relative reduction in CVD risk from the added therapy, and the potential for net benefit.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

This could be a pooling project of existing data from observational databases and clinical trials. Sophisticated pharmacoepidemiologic methods would be needed (and likely need to be developed) to draw appropriate inferences for application to clinical practice.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Jennifer Robinson MD MPH

Voting

3 net votes
11 up votes
8 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Should clinical primary prevention of ASCVD be guided by subclincal disease or estimated risk?

Current approaches to guiding use of clinical primary prevention interventions, e.g., statins and aspirin, are based on treating patients who exceed a specific risk threshold. The performance of risk estimation is good, but not outstanding, and results from clinical and population studies continue to support the value of new biomarkers. Given the widespread use of preventive therapies, the lack of untreated cohorts is... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

The size of the US and global population qualifying for treatment with a statin or aspirin for primary prevention of ASCVD is immense. Given the performance of risk estimation, even if risk estimation were universally implemented, patients would be misclassified with the consequence of being under or over treated. If treatment based on presence of subclinical disease is more cost-effective, the benefits of preventive therapies can be enjoyed by larger proportions of our population and more ASCVD can be averted. Given the ionizing radiation, albeit low intensity, associated with CT scanning, it is incumbent on the biomedical research community to document the advantages, if any, of a subclinical disease guided approach to provision of clinical primary prevention services for ASCVD.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Many people will be concordant for the two methods of guiding provision of therapy, about 65% of middle aged and older adults. That is, many people will be high risk and have subclinical disease and many people will below risk and not have subclinical disease. It is only the discordant people, i.e., high risk people without subclinical disease and low risk people with subclinical disease, who will be informative study participants. Hence, many people will need to be screened to identify the roughly 35% who are discordant, and would be treated differently by the two approaches.

People may be unwilling to accept randomization once they know the information about their estimated risk and presence or absence of subclinical disease. If a low participation rate among eligible persons is observed, an even larger population of screenees would be needed.

A vanguard phase could provide information about these potential challenges.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea David Goff, Donald Lloyd-Jones, Phil Greeland.....

Voting

-3 net votes
6 up votes
9 down votes
Active

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Targeting Preclinical Diastolic Dysfunction to Prevent Heart Failure

Heart failure (HF) affects over 5 million American adults, and projected estimates show growth of this epidemic by 25% over the next 15 years as the population of the United States continues to age. Heart failure with preserved EF (HFpEF) encompasses 50% of all heart failure cases. Preclinical diastolic dysfunction (PDD) is defined as normal systolic function, moderate or severe diastolic dysfunction determined by Doppler... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

There is currently no FDA approved therapy for HFpEF and yet HFpEF makes up 50% of all HF population. The prevalence of PDD (ACC/AHA Stage B HF) is abt 28% of the general population and these patients do not have symptoms of HF. Understanding the pathophysiology of PDD may leady to the development of therapeutic strategies to prevent the development of HFpEF. This would decrease the burden of HF impact public health and be cost-effective, similar to the use of vaccine to prevent infectious diseases.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

With echocardiography, we are able to identify PDD patients before they develop symptomatic HF. Hence with research funding, we can better characterize preclinical diastolic dysfunction, and to discover further targets for this entity to prevent development of HFpEF

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Horng H Chen

Voting

1 net vote
2 up votes
1 down votes
Active