Showing 4 ideas for tag "primary"

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

A Program of Research in the Prevention of Chronic Heart Failure

There is a need to address chronic heart failure (HF) through improved identification of patients at risk for HF and of patients with pathological ventricular remodeling who have minimal evidence of clinical HF, and more focused and individualized pharmacologic and lifestyle treatments and monitoring of patients with HF risk. Approaches would include big data collection, omics, statistical modeling, and focused clinical... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Substantially reduce the age-adjusted incidence and population burden of chronic heart failure.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

The big data and omics revolutions have made it feasible to collect and analyze a variety of data in large numbers of persons within a relatively short time. A very large sample size provides excellent statistical power. Also, the public health and economic magnitude of the problem create the urgency needed to address the critical challenge expeditiously.
Chronic heart failure (HF) is easily the most common and growing cardiovascular cause of hospitalization and impaired functional status and quality of life in the U.S. and much of the world. This is the case despite improved pharmacologic and lifestyle treatment of HF, as well as improved control of blood pressure in the general population. While some HF in the very elderly may reflect the aging process, the epidemiology suggests that most incident cases could be prevented or postponed for years. Also, there are major ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in the incidence of HF.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

A Program of Research in the Prevention of Chronic Heart Failure

There is a need to improve identification and surveillance of persons at risk for heart failure and pathological ventricular remodeling prior to development of clinically overt heart failure.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Substantially reduce the age-adjusted incidence and population burden of chronic heart failure.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

The big data and omics revolutions have made it feasible to collect and analyze a variety of data in large numbers of persons within a relatively short time. A very large sample size provides excellent statistical power. Also, the public health and economic magnitude of the problem create the urgency needed to address the critical challenge expeditiously.
Chronic heart failure (HF) is easily the most common and growing cardiovascular cause of hospitalization and impaired functional status and quality of life in the U.S. and much of the world. This is the case despite improved pharmacologic and lifestyle treatment of HF, as well as improved control of blood pressure in the general population. While some HF in the very elderly may reflect the aging process, the epidemiology suggests that most incident cases could be prevented or postponed for years. Also, there are major ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in the incidence of HF.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

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28 up votes
14 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Should clinical primary prevention of ASCVD be guided by subclincal disease or estimated risk?

Current approaches to guiding use of clinical primary prevention interventions, e.g., statins and aspirin, are based on treating patients who exceed a specific risk threshold. The performance of risk estimation is good, but not outstanding, and results from clinical and population studies continue to support the value of new biomarkers. Given the widespread use of preventive therapies, the lack of untreated cohorts is... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

The size of the US and global population qualifying for treatment with a statin or aspirin for primary prevention of ASCVD is immense. Given the performance of risk estimation, even if risk estimation were universally implemented, patients would be misclassified with the consequence of being under or over treated. If treatment based on presence of subclinical disease is more cost-effective, the benefits of preventive therapies can be enjoyed by larger proportions of our population and more ASCVD can be averted. Given the ionizing radiation, albeit low intensity, associated with CT scanning, it is incumbent on the biomedical research community to document the advantages, if any, of a subclinical disease guided approach to provision of clinical primary prevention services for ASCVD.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Many people will be concordant for the two methods of guiding provision of therapy, about 65% of middle aged and older adults. That is, many people will be high risk and have subclinical disease and many people will below risk and not have subclinical disease. It is only the discordant people, i.e., high risk people without subclinical disease and low risk people with subclinical disease, who will be informative study participants. Hence, many people will need to be screened to identify the roughly 35% who are discordant, and would be treated differently by the two approaches.

People may be unwilling to accept randomization once they know the information about their estimated risk and presence or absence of subclinical disease. If a low participation rate among eligible persons is observed, an even larger population of screenees would be needed.

A vanguard phase could provide information about these potential challenges.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea David Goff, Donald Lloyd-Jones, Phil Greeland.....

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

How can we implement what we already know for ASCVD prevention?

We have a number of highly effective evidence-based interventions that have been shown to reduce ASCVD events - statins, BP drugs, aspirin, acute care. Yet large proportions of high risk population groups are not taking evidence-based treatment. Numerous interventions have been tried at multiple levels from the individual patient to the federal government payors. What are the best practices? How can we systematically... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

A starting point would be to complete the work of the Implementation Working Group convened as part of the NHLBI Cardiovascular Prevention Guidelines in 2008. Needs: (1) Collaboration of consortia involved in multilevel prevention efforts (HMOs, pharma plan managers, health systems, etc) (2) An information warehouse of best practices from consortium members. (3) Collaborate with learning healthcare systems groups to test & evaluate implementation/interventions (40 Disseminate best practices & support to broader range of groups

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Much work has been done in this area & should be collated & assessed for efficacy and cost-benefit. Collaborative framework needed, will require infrastructure funding.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Jennifer G Robinson MD MPH

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