Showing 4 ideas for tag "symptoms"

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Address bias of doctors treating obese patients

Twice I was allowed to develop severe heart failure symptoms that required hospitalization to treat because my primary care physician assumed that my ONLY problem was that I am fat.

Every doctor knows that obesity can lead to the development of diabetes, heart diseases, joint damage and yet too many doctors on the frontlines just say: You're fat go diet.

My first experience with this was when I was first diagnosed... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

I'd like to know how many patients die because their primary care doctors don't take their health complains seriously. If you can somehow get primary care doctors to open their eyes and do their jobs, patients like me might not be on the verge of death because their doctors refuse to listen. I had a history of heart failure, I told my primary care doctor that my first doctor completely missed the symptoms in 1996, including swollen ankles and feet, the inability to walk two blocks without stopping and having coughing fits that forced me out of bed into a wing-back chair. I started having those symptoms again in 2011 and ended up spending two and half weeks in a hospital in November 2012 to treat my problems and to drain 96 pounds of fluid from my body. I couldn't bend my legs to get into a car or a truck.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Of course it is possible to deal with this issue. The question is whether doctors and medical researchers are ready to be honest about the role neglect by primary care physicians plays in the overall health of their patients.

Both of the doctors who risked my life had good reputations. I liked them until they stopped listening to me. I had an echocardiogram in October 2011 my ejection fraction was between 20 and 15. I thought I was going to die. My doctor said: numbers don't mean anything??? One year later, I spent two and a half weeks in the hospital.

Why do you think I'm hopping mad. How many other patients are dealing with the same types of problems. I literally had to take Xanax because when my symptoms returned I was afraid that my stupid doctors would kill me by ignoring me again. I reported my fears in detail to United Healthcare, I switched to a more competent medical system. I'm losing weight and spent hours walking around Yosemite National Park last month. That's the difference between doctors who listen and doctors who don't. A patient should not be afraid that their doctor is so stupid that she or he will kill them .... accidentally.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Mary Crystal Cage

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Symptom management in sickle cell

Symptom management is a significant challenge for individuals living with sickle cell. In most cases, sickle cell research in symptom management focuses on pain. Although important, many other symptoms such a fatigue, anxiety, and depression need to be identified and intervened on to improve the quality of life for individuals living with sickle cell disease.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea International Association of Sickle Cell Nurses and Physician Assistants, Inc.

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19 up votes
4 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Reducing Patient Delay Times with ACS especially STEMI

The major barrier to further reducing mortality from ACS in particular STEMI remains patient delay. Symptoms are either ignored or misinterpreted and this behavior has not changed despite community education efforts. The advance of social media as well as smartphones and other internet based tools suggests that there is a new opportunity to potentially help change human behavior.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

The current patient delay time from symptom onset to seeking medical care is 2 hours. If we could reduce this to 1 hour we could further reduce ACS especially STEMI related mortality

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

The use of social media and smartphones to actively change public behaviors when experiencing potential medical conditions should be possible. Companies like Google and Facebook that have an interest in health could be approach to partner in this effort

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Mohamud Daya

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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Prodromal symptoms and signs of a heart attack/acute coronary syndrome

Can early warning symptoms and signs of a heart attack (acute coronary syndrome) be quantified through standardized symptom surveys, biochemical measures, electrocardiographic, or other diagnostic means to enable earlier evaluation and treatment?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

If patients could detect symptoms that have been demonstrated prospectively to herald an impending heart attack and/or if there were sensitive biochemical, electrocardiographic, or other tests that could be performed by patients/bystanders (e.g., in the home setting), by emergency medical services personnel, primary care providers or others in community settings to assist with decision support about seeking intervention for early symptoms/signs of an acute coronary syndrome, this would potentially save thousands of lives from heart attacks and sudden cardiac death.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Prodromal heart attack symptoms (waxing and waning of symptoms in advance of complete vessel occlusion) have not been prospectively described or quantified. The standard symptom constellations from epidemiologic surveys have been described for heart attack symptoms (ACS) though there is variability in symptom data collection among heart attack surveys as well. Also while there are biochemical tests for muscle damage (troponin), there is not a biochemical test for ischemia such as could be applied in the home or work setting. Similarly it would be helpful if a self-applied electrocardiogram by patients/bystanders could give a diagnosis of early ischemia (prior to occlusion) so patients could seek observational care.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Mary Hand

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