Showing 8 ideas for tag "transplant"

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Transplantation across HLA barriers in aplastic anemia

Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is curative in aplastic anemia with much less intrinsic toxicity than transplantation in hematologic malignancies. The recent BMT-CTN trial demonstrated 97% survival at one year with little subsequent decline. However patients without matched related or unrelated donors have graft-rejection rates of up to 50%. Preliminary data from the Netherlands suggests that anti-thymocyte globulin... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

The use of umbilical cord blood or haploidentical donors has proven effective in patients with hematologic malignancies, but in non-malignant disorders outcomes are limited by graft rejection. Overcoming rejection in this context would be applicable to other non-malignant disorders such as thalassemia, sickle cell anemia, and other congenital disorders of hematopoiesis.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

It will require a large coordinated network like BMT-CTN to obtain sufficient patients studied in a uniform fashion to provide consistent reproducible data. .

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Joseph Antin

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137 up votes
27 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Sickle Cell anemia and Aplastic anemia survivors: Late effects and quality of life issues in Stem Cell Transplant Survivors

Most of the patients suffering from non-malignant hematologic conditions are cured of the original disease with Hematopoitec Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT) but still their survival is less compared to age matched general population, and additionally they suffer from unique complications of HSCT culminating into a variety of late physical, psychologic, financial, and social complications (“late effects”). Considerable improvements... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

One million HSCT mile stone was recently reached and the utilization of HSCTs continues to increase. For many non-malignant hematologic conditions particularly sickle cell anemia and bone marrow failure syndromes, HSCT is the only potentially curative option. Most HSCT survivors are living beyond a year, but can suffer from devastating complications of HSCT which include graft-versus-host-disease, second cancers, diabetes, infertility, congestive heart failure, blindness, and bronchiolitis obliterans, besides many others which lead to increased overall HSCT related disease burden. A lot of efforts are currently being put in cancer survivorship by the ACS, NCI, ASCO and other societies, but very little emphasis is being laid on sickle cell or aplastic anemia survivors. This area of HSCT survivorship becomes more important from health disparities perspective too, since majority of the hemoglobinopathy HSCTs performed in the US are in racial minorities. Comparative effectiveness research (CER) in HSCT survivorship is essential to delineate the overall disease burden this population and understand the risks and outcomes of HSCT late effects. To compare the effectiveness of survivorship programs and research, especially for those survivors who are at risk of health disparities is a top priority of the Institute of Medicine CER 2009 initiative.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Majority of the HSCT survivors of benign hematologic conditions are now living beyond 2 years post-HSCT. Blood and Marrow Transplant (BMT) Clinical Trials Network (CTN) was established in 2001 to conduct large Multi-Institutional clinical trials and is funded by the NHLBI. Since the infrastructure is in place to conduct studies related to all aspects of HSCT, this would be an area to explore first from feasibility perspective since thousands of patients have already been successfully enrolled through the BMT-CTN studies. From NHLBI strategic perspective, this would place CTN (and Emmes Corporation) in an excellent unique position of addressing CER for survivorship issues and health disparities within one study, since the population understudy would mainly be consistent of racial minorities – with the overall goal of improving the long term health, preventing late effects, improving quality of life, and reduce the overall health burden (DALYs and societal costs) of thousands of HSCT survivors in the US and globally.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Shahrukh Hashmi

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71 net votes
89 up votes
18 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

The role of Extracorporeal Photopheresis (ECP) in the prevention and treatment of rejection of heart and lung transplants

According to the ISHLT, more than 4,000 patients undergo a heart transplant each year, and almost 4,000 receive single or double lung transplants. Their prognosis depends heavily on the avoidance of rejection, which claims the majority of their lives. For heart transplant recipients, the median survival is 11 years, while for lung transplant recipients, it is approximately 5 years. The current most common anti-rejection... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Patients who are fortunate to receive a matched heart or one or two lungs transplants are at high risk of dying from rejection early and even years after the operation. Thus, they are given cocktails of highly toxic anti-rejection drugs for the rest of their lives. Unfortunately, despite compliance with their drug regimens, many patients still suffer repeated episodes of rejection that may be fatal. In addition, they develop serious side-effects such as diabetes, infections, malignancies, renal failure, etc. ECP has been shown efficacy in preventing and treating cardiac transplant rejection, but the data are limited. ECP appears to benefit such patients by causing an increase in the number of circulating T regulatory (“T regs”) cells. T regs are known to mediate immune tolerance, the ultimate goal of a long-term successful transplant. The role of ECP in lung transplantation is mostly unknown. Very preliminary data have been gathered from retrospective studies. We suspect that patients with early bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (“BOS”) will benefit from ECP prior to developing irreversible pulmonary damage. In both types of transplants, however, it is unknown when should ECP be started, how often it should be employed (treatment schedule), and for how long. Finally, the most compelling argument to use ECP in heart and lung transplantation is its excellent side-effect profile. Furthermore, ECP may allow a decrease in the number of drugs needed to prevent rejection.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Many patients with heart and lung transplants develop severe and often fatal rejection despite the current drug options to prevent rejection. ECP could be added to their treatment regimens and decrease side-effects, improving long-term survival.

ECP is generally well tolerated and complications are extremely infrequent.

There is a great potential for multi-disciplinary collaboration between Apheresis Medicine, Cardiology, and Pulmonary specialists.

It is conceivable that manufacturers of ECP instruments will be interested in contributing to the design and support of these studies.

Such studies could shed light in the mechanism of action of ECP in heart and lung transplantation.

There is a need to develop standardized treatment regimens based on well designed clinical trials to further optimize the use of ECP. Development and standardization of measurable outcomes is critical for the success of clinical studies in apheresis in general, and ECP in particular.

Challenges:

  1. Limited number of institutions providing ECP treatment.
  2. Cost of ECP procedures.
  3. Small number of animal models available for apheresis research. Thus, limited studies of ECP mechanism(s) of action. However, understanding pathological mechanisms and their relationship to response to apheresis is critical for optimization and advancement of patient care in heart and lung transplantation.
  4. Lack of infra-structure for apheresis research.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Marisa Marques on behalf of ASFA

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80 net votes
102 up votes
22 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Immunologic Treatment of Hematologic Malignancies

How can the effectiveness of existing curative therapies be improved for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Much remains to be understood about immunotherapies in order to facilitate their broad use in the treatment of hematologic disorders. While studies to date have demonstrated significant potential applications, longer-term studies are necessary to further improve the profile of these therapies, including enhancing their overall efficacy while reducing associated toxicities. The efficacy of existing curative therapies can be enhanced by evaluating the mechanisms involved in producing cytokine release syndrome; a condition which has been observed in several patients receiving this therapy. Furthermore, a careful grading scheme to predict toxicity so as to guide the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies is also required. Target identification is another important issue to advance the field. While targeting CD19 appears to be promising, it results in loss of B-cell immunity and requires prolonged immunoglobulin replacement therapies and/or allo-transplantation and new immunologic targets need to be identified in both B cell and T cell malignancies as was as acute and chronic myeloid leukemias. Minimizing the off-tumor target-mediated toxicity of both CAR T-cell and checkpoint blockade therapies would help optimize their utility.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Alice Kuaban on behalf of the American Society of Hematology (ASH)

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43 net votes
63 up votes
20 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Transplant to Cure Older Adults with Hematologic Malignancy-Removing the Blindfold

While transplant for patients 60 and older for high-risk hematologic malignancies has increased and observational data are promising, the risks and benefits of translant versus non-transplant remain largely unknown. We now have the tools and mechanisms to remove the blindfold!

The NHLBI should support the cooperative groups in conjunction with the BMT-CTN to establish a common framework for transplant trials in older... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Hematologic malignancies are more common and less treatable in older patients. This trend will contine as the number and proportion of older people in society increases. Older patients are frequently treated but rarely on studies. The availability of haploidentical and cord donor sources, better supportive care, and more tolerable regimens permits transplant to be widely accessible and utilized.

A critical question for the entire field of hematologic malignancies is determing the risks and benefits of allogeneic transplant for older adults. This question is posed across the country, every day by every patient and physician struggling to treat older adults with hematologic malignancies. The confluence of molecular and cytogenetic disease markers and novel measures of patient health should permit identifying those most likely to be cured and those least likely to benefit. Such data will ultimately inform the next generation of transplant trials in this population.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

The number of patients with any of these diseases (e.g., AML, MDS, NHL and perhaps ALL) who are 60 years and older is significant. The challenge is to develop a coordinated effort to prospectively capture disease and patient health data to answer which subgroups benefit or do not.
Methods to capture patient health status have already been developed through a standardized Geriatric Assessment used in the Alliance and other studies. Most of the survey can be done electronically by a patient or by telephone. Disease based molecular markers have emerged as standard measures within cooperative group studies to augment cytogenetic and morphologic classification.

Ensuring cooperative groups develop uniform design and data may be difficult. Yet investigators gain much and lose little by standardizing the data capture of what already occurs (patients moving to transplant on hematologic malignancy trials).

Another challenge is to develop standardized measures after transplant beyond survival such as function free survival and quality of life that are patient centered. Electronic tools to capture data, especially for non-transplant patients, will greatly reduce this burden.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Andrew Artz

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20 net votes
36 up votes
16 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Improving cardiorespiratory fitness prior to hematopoietic cell transplantation

Can cardiorespiratory fitness prior to hematopoietic cell transplantation be improved and will this limit morbidity and mortality following transplantation?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

HCT is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality from transplant-related complications. Reduction in transplant-related mortality would lead to more favorable risk/benefit assessments for the ability of transplant to cure life-threatening hematologic disorders including non-malignant conditions. Comorbidity and patient-reported functional status impairment are known to increase the risk for transplant-related mortality. Single institution studies suggest that cardiorespiratory fitness may serve a similar role as a predictive pre-transplant variable. Unlike comorbidity, cardiorespiratory fitness is potentially modifiable. However, the optimal way to improve cardiorespiratory fitness through pre-transplant exercise and lifestyle interventions is not known. Understanding how to improve cardiorespiratory fitness through a short term intervention would also benefit other health conditions relevant to the NHLBI in which future treatment is intensive and associated with significant risk.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Understanding how to improve cardiorespiratory fitness in a short period of time will require a research agenda that addresses the following challenges: how to measure cardiorespiratory fitness in a generalized and scalable way, which may or may not require maximal exercise testing for all participants; how to design intensive exercise interventions that are at least partially home-based, in order to minimize resource burden on patients and centers; and how to personalize intervention delivery and testing in a way that is tailored to the baseline fitness levels and capabilities of each participant. Meeting these challenges will enable large-scale, personalized exercise testing and intervention delivery in other non-transplant populations.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea William Wood, Thomas Shea

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21 net votes
42 up votes
21 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Heart transplant surveillance

It is essential to develop clinically viable, non-invasive, less expensive technologies for the surveillance of allograft rejection in heart transplant patients. Critical challenges that exist in the near term or long term surveillance after transplant is the unavailability of molecular and cellular level markers that can be non-invasively imaged and quantified detect rejection and thus improve patient survival. Development... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Development of methods for near term or long term surveillance after transplant can help detect the rejection and thus improve patient survival

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

The fast growth in the imaging technologies and molecular and cellular imaging technologies are gaining foot in cardiovascular sciences and should be feasible within a decade
The current surveillance to detect transplant rejection requires repeated testing with endo myocardial biopsy and catheter angiography. Both technologies are highly invasive and very expensive. Post-transplant surveillance is focused on the cellular rejection in the near term after transplant and cardiac allograft vasculopathy in the long term.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

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1 net vote
14 up votes
13 down votes
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