Showing 7 ideas for tag "lung"

Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Increasing Regenerative Medical Strategies in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a complex, progressive condition characterized by high blood pressure in the lungs and restriction of flow through the pulmonary arterial system. Current PAH therapies mainly act of the vasoconstrictive component of the disease; however there is a widely accepted view that another contributor to the disease is an abnormal overgrowth of cells that line the pulmonary arteries, which... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

In the past twenty years, 12 PAH targeted-therapies have been approved by the FDA. This increase in disease state awareness and in the treatment armamentarium have contributed to an increase in average survival from 2.8 years to an estimated 8-10 years. However, current treatments primarily address the vasoconstrictive component of the disease and do not address the now accepted theory of post-apoptotic overgrowth of hyperproliferative cells of the pulmonary vessels. A number of circulating stem and progenitor cells, derived from the bone marrow, have been identified that could have roles in repair of the pulmonary vascular system when interacting with the quickly, abnormally growing cells in the lung vessels. Work in this area has been named as a future research opportunity in the NHLBI-ORDR Strategic Plan for Lung Vascular Research (Erzurum S, et al. 2010).

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Basic and translational research support is needed—including high-throughput approaches such as phage display and large-scale proteomic analysis—to better understand the relationship between circulating bone marrow-derived cells, lung-resident stem and progenitor cells, and endothelial cells of the pulmonary arterial system.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Pulmonary Hyeprtension Association, Michael Gray, Katie Kroner

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Research Opportunities in HLB to Facilitate Aging in Place

There is a need for greater evidence-based research over the next 5-10 years to reduce healthcare costs, reduce hospitalizations, and support older persons with significant heart, lung, blood, sleep conditions to remain in their private homes if feasible, if technology is utilized that fosters clinical and epidemiologic research.

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

No other force will have as big of an impact on our health system as the unalterable rate of our aging population and subsequent increased rate of heart, lung and blood diseases. The impact of doing nothing is unforeseeable.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Evidence-based research over the next 5-10 years to reduce healthcare costs, reduce hospitalizations, and support older persons with significant heart, lung and blood conditions remain in their private homes is feasible if technology is utilized that fosters clinical and epidemiologic research.
Many cardiovascular risk factors increase as the population ages including uncontrolled systolic hypertension and atherosclerosis both contributing to the well-being of our society and increasingly high health care costs (Izzo, Levy, & Black, 2012). No other force will have as big of an impact on our health system as the unalterable rate of our aging population and subsequent increased rate of heart, lung and blood diseases. The impact of doing nothing is unforeseeable.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Developing animal models of lung transplantation.

Lung transplantation as a cure for terminal lung disease has seen little improvement in outcomes for more than 20 years. The field remains highly challenging, in part, because of an absence of robust animal models which are technically- feasible and reproducible across centers. Further, models have limited relevance to clinical (chronic) airway remodeling, the leading problem in pulmonary allografts. In the absence of... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

The critical challenge is to address the leading problems facing lung transplant patients through the creative application of multiple technological platforms employing all available pre-clinical models by multiple NIH investigators. With greater focus on the deeper development of existent models, the delineation of their strengths and limitations and importantly, cooperation between Academic Centers, efforts can be optimized to improve outcomes for a condition that has enjoyed little benefit from basic research.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

The siloed nature of much clinical and experimental lung transplantation research limits progress and broader initiatives. With specific respect to developing animal models of lung transplantation, the general lack of consensus about the suitability of the techniques employed at different institutions stifles progress. A strategic vision, guided by leaders across the field, highlighting benefits and limitations of current animal models can be coupled with a consensus statement about the most pressing issues in lung transplantation worthy of increased investigation.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Mark Nicolls

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Regenerative Medicine 2.0 in Heart and Lung Research - Back to the Drawing Board

Stem cell therapies have been quite successful in hematologic disease but the outcomes of clinical studies using stem cells for cardiopulmonary disease have been rather modest.

Explanations for this discrepancy such as the fact that our blood has a high rate of physiologic, endogenous turnover and regeneration whereas these processes occur at far lower rates in the heart and lung. Furthermore, hematopoietic stem cells... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Some barriers to successfully implementing cardiopulmonary regeneration include the complex heterogeneous nature of the heart and lung.

Hematopoietic stem cells can give rise to all hematopoietic cells but the heart and lung appear to contain numerous pools of distinct regenerative stem and progenitor cells, many of which only regenerate a limited cell type in the respective organ. The approach of injecting one stem cell type that worked so well for hematopoietic stem cells is unlikely to work in the heart and lung.

We therefore need new approaches which combine multiple regenerative cell types and pathways in order to successfully repair and regenerate heart and lung tissues. These cell types will likely also require specific matrix cues since there are numerous, heterogeneous microenvironments in the heart and lung.

If we rethink our current approaches to regenerating the heart and lung and we use combined approaches in which multiple cell types and microevironments are concomitantly regenerated (ideally by large scale collaborations between laboratories), we are much more likely to achieve success.

This will represent a departure from the often practiced "Hey, let us inject our favorite cell" approach that worked so well in hematologic disease but these novel, combined approaches targeting multiple endogenous and/or exogenous regenerative cells could fundamentally change our ability to treat heart and lung disease.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Jalees Rehman

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Leveraging big data for T4 translation research

What approaches can help leverage the emerging big data in health and health care for observational and interventional implementation research in heart, lung, blood, sleep diseases?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

• Integration of big data analytics into T4 research study design and interventions development
• Innovative linkages across multiple health and non-health sector data
• Innovative methods to analyze big data linked across sectors
• Various communities are using big data analytics to understand population health data (e.g. electronic medical records s) and opportunities exist for consolidation of these efforts and standardization of methodologies

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

• NIH now has focus on big data in its formative stages
• Significant amount of NIH’s budget is/will be dedicated to big data research
• NHLBI can leverage NIH’s investment by foster research in D&I big data analytics and systems science
• Future investment in big data should yield opportunities and focus efforts

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

What are the most effective strategies for reducing alarm fatigue and optimizing cardiorespiratory monitor alarm management?

Hospital cardiorespiratory monitors have great potential to save lives, but are hampered by high false alarm rates that contribute to alarm fatigue. While the long term solution is developing new medical devices that will do this better, few hospitals will benefit from new device innovations in the next decade. In order to better identify early signs of cardiorespiratory deterioration in the hospital at an early stage... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Improved strategies for optimally detecting deterioration using existing bedside cardiorespiratory monitoring technologies has the potential to impact the care of hundreds of thousands of hospitalized adults and children each year.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

This is highly feasible with a fairly modest allocation of resources. This work falls under heart and lung disease, hospital medicine, nursing research, and implementation science.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Chris Bonafide, MD, MSCE

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