Showing 10 ideas for tag "acute"

Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Hypoxia, acute chest syndrome and sickle cell disease

What markers in sickle cell disease can predict hypoxia after acute chest syndrome or pneumonia?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Understanding that sickle cell disease has a character of depriving oxygen, is there any predicators that can tell if a child will have hypoxia after experiencing acute chest syndrome or pneumonia.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Sickle Cell Warriors, Inc. community members

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32 net votes
41 up votes
9 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

The treatment of asthma in patients with SCD prevents the development of ACS and VOS.

Does the aggressive treatment of asthma prevent the developement of acute chest syndrome (ACS) and vaso-occlusive syndrome (VOS) in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD)?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Improvement of health for persons with SCD.
Decreased hospitalizations and use of health resources.
Better understanding of the role of bronchospastic/inflammatory airway disease and hypoxemia as causes of acute chest syndrome and VOC.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Feasible but stumbling block could be enrollment of patients since many patients with SCD are not seen by asthma specialists. Study could be a multicenter study with two hospitals in one major city and in one center, patients with SCD receive usual care and at another center they receive aggressive treatment and monitoring of their lung disease.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Scott Schroeder

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13 net votes
27 up votes
14 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Preventing hospitalization of asthma patients through agressive acute asthma management

Develop simplified agressive acute asthma treatment protocol and promote the implementation for primary care, ED, Urgent care, Internists, Pediatricians, Allergists, Pulmonologists, and Families. Goal is to prevent hospitalization of children and adults with asthma.
For example: 3 cycles of Duoneb and Albuterol, monitoring pulsoximetry, with oral / IM Dexamethasone dosage. Also initiation of controller medication at... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea D M Meier MD

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0 net votes
7 up votes
7 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Non-invasive vs Invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation in Managing Acute Respiratory Failure

What is the comparative effectiveness of a Non-invasive vs. Invasive Positive Pressure

 

Ventilation Protocol for managing acute respiratory failure due to acute exacerbations of COPD

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

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1 net vote
1 up votes
0 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Combination Cardioprotective Therapy for AMI

Which therapy or combination of therapies to reduce injury from acute myocardial infarction (AMI) will be most efficacious for future clinical trials?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

AMI and heart failure continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western world.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Promising cardioprotective candidates are emerging. Additional pre-clinical and clinical research is needed to further investigate these new strategies, alone and in combination, to improve outcomes following AMI.
Numerous studies have implicated various pharmacological and interventional techniques (e.g., adenosine, cyclosporine, postconditioning, and remote ischemic per-conditioning) have been explored.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea NHLBI Staff

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-7 net votes
6 up votes
13 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Direct thrombin inhibitors and anti-Xa (Ten A) inhibitors in trauma patients - physiologic effects and impact on outcomes trending idea

Direct thrombin inhibitors and anti-Xa (Ten A) inhibitors are new, undetectable and irreversible. We have no data on how well these drugs correlate with current measures of coagulopathy such as thromboelastography, or whether antifibrinolytics should be used in patients who are on these drugs. These drugs may increase incidence of traumatic brain injury after minor injury. They are also going to be used increasingly in... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Understanding pathophysiology of coagulopathy in trauma patients due to these drugs may lead to innovations in management of coagulopathy and help increase our ability to predict/prognostic poor clinical outcomes in patients on these new anticoagulants, detect these drugs in a timely manner and develop antidotes/reversal agents. 

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

These are eminently feasible with adequate support from the NHLBI. Challenges will be finding collaborations or institutions that have enough clinical volume and adequate basic science/translational research infrastructure to look at these questions seriously.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Sudha Jayaraman

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-7 net votes
6 up votes
13 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Detection of inflammatory monocytes as a biomarker of CVD

Coronary artery disease (CAD), of which atherosclerosis is a major contributor, costs the United States $108.9 billion each year. While a number of conventional risk factors such as smoking, diabetes and hypertension have been associated with CAD, their predictive performance is poor in the prevention of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Despite the prevalence of ACS in our society, there are currently no molecular biomarkers... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Critical Challenge (CC)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Need more opportunities to put forth innovative diagnostic and therapeutic solutions than currently vetted through the CTSC process.
We have developed the Artery-on-a-chip (A-chip), currently in a research tool format, which accurately measures the extent of inflammatory monocyte activation in a whole blood sample by shearing it along a molecular sensor and enumerating monocyte capture.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Scott I Simon, Greg Foster, Ehrin Armstrong

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-6 net votes
8 up votes
14 down votes
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Goal 3: Advance Translational Research

Increasing the adoption of low tidal volume ventilation in ARDS patients

How can we use implementation science to increase the adoption of low-tidal volume ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)?

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Low tidal volume ventilation has been shown to significantly reduce mortality in ARDS patients (from 40% to 31% in the ARMA trial published in NEJM in 2000), but it is inconsistently adopted (frequently with rates <50% in both community and academic settings). Improving adherence has the potential to significantly improve mortality in patients with ARDS.

Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

Given the rapid growth and interest in the field of implementation science over the past several years, addressing this question is now feasible.

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-10 net votes
2 up votes
12 down votes
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Goal 2: Reduce Human Disease

Ischemia-independent mechanisms contributing to infarct size

What are the mechanisms of ischemia-independent mechanisms contributing to the infarct size in patients with acute myocardial infarction?

Infarct size is the single most important prognostic factor for short- and long-term outcomes.

The success in reperfusion strategies have shown that prompt reperfusion leads to a reduction in infarct size, and to improved outcomes.

Despite effective reperfusion, however, a secondary... more »

Is this idea a Compelling Question (CQ) or Critical Challenge (CC)? Compelling Question (CQ)

Details on the impact of addressing this CQ or CC

Addressing this compelling question may lead to:

  1. Improved therapy and outcomes for acute myocardial infarction
  2. Reduction of acute morbidity/mortality following reperfusion
  3. Prevention of heart failure
Feasibility and challenges of addressing this CQ or CC

The progresses in basic science/signaling, preclinical models, imaging techniques, and invasive monitoring now provide the ideal setting to complete this research in a preclinical model or pilot exploratory clinical trials.

Name of idea submitter and other team members who worked on this idea Antonio Abbate

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-2 net votes
6 up votes
8 down votes
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